Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Yoshinkan] Re: changing dojo's

Expand Messages
  • chris young
    I mostly agree with this with one caveate, if you are staying ahead of shite throughout the technique, you are robbing shite of feeling the technique. This may
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 1, 2004
      I mostly agree with this with one caveate, if you are staying ahead of shite
      throughout the technique, you are robbing shite of feeling the technique.
      This may be good practice if you are working with a shite who is slamming
      you with malice. But for general training, you should trust shite not to
      hurt you, and let them control you. The shite/uke relationship is a
      co-operative effort, where uke provides a suitable platform for shite to
      practice his technique. If uke is always ahead, there is no need for uke to
      exist, shite could just practice solo. Also, it will likely prompt shite to
      go harder.

      As I have said many times before on this forum, I think that uke's roll may
      be the most misunderstood part of our training. In my training, I try to be
      the uke who provides the force required for the technique, in the correct
      quantity for the ability of shite. I also try to act as though I don't know
      what is comming,(very hard to do) and thus it would be impossible to stay
      ahead of shite. The only time I resist is if I'm asked to, or if my ego
      flairs up while working with a shite who is more interested in showing me
      how good they are than in practicing the technique. Those ego flair ups are
      something I'm still working on.

      As for changing dojo's, each dojo especially those of other styles, has one
      thing or other at which they exel, find what that is, and learn it. If you
      cannont find anything good, leave. From the brief visits I've made to Ki
      Society dojo's and multi style seminars, I can tell you that in the good
      ones, the kyu ranks and lower yudansha understand flow and timimg better
      than thier counterparts in your average Yoshinkan dojo. They don't do so
      well with pins and such.

      Chris
    • Anibal Ibarra
      I understand what you are saying, but as to pain, it is amazing how Mustar Sensei can control you and you don t even feel his hands on you. You don t feel
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 2, 2004
        I understand what you are saying, but as to pain, it
        is amazing how Mustar Sensei can control you and you
        don't even feel his hands on you. You don't feel like
        you are pin down, but if you try to move is
        impossible. Sometimes the seniors are trying to be
        nice to the junior uke so I think it'll be alright if
        you just hold your position and let him know how much
        you as an uke want to be pushed. I think that the
        better our seniors become the better that we will
        become because they'll help us to get there. As to
        those of you that haven't seen Sensei Mustard yet, it
        is really worth it. Thanks.


        --- brendangrace8e <brendangrace8e@...> wrote:
        > Good day,
        > I am new to this group and was wondering if anyone
        > has ever moved
        > dojo's and had concerns about the difference's in
        > training. My last
        > dojo placed emphasis on being able to perform a
        > technique cleanly.
        > Uke would only move or tap if the technique or
        > control was
        > effective. If it wasn't we worked to help find the
        > missing
        > element. My new dojo doesn't place any emphasis on
        > this. Uke drops
        > and taps because they are expected to. It concerns
        > me that while I
        > am not a high kyu, very few of the senior students
        > can control me.
        > I don't mean I'm fighting them, just there is
        > nothing in their
        > technique to make me want to move, either from
        > skeletal lock
        > control, or from pain control (thinking nikajo
        > here). As I've only
        > attended one other dojo and attended 3 Kenshu's
        > (Mustard Sensie once-
        > awesome!) I don't know if I am too attached to one
        > way and need to
        > be more open minded. I've stuck with it for 6
        > months and feel my
        > Aikido is definately weaker, but there is no other
        > Yoshinkan dojo I
        > can attend. Suggestions or advise please.
        >
        > Brendan
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        __________________________________
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! Search - Find what you�re looking for faster
        http://search.yahoo.com
      • mario gomez
        ... From: yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com Date: 03/02/04 00:42:41 To: yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [Yoshinkan] changing dojo s I understand what you are
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 2, 2004
          -------Original Message-------

          From: yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com
          Date: 03/02/04 00:42:41
          To: yoshinkan@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Yoshinkan] changing dojo's

          I understand what you are saying, but as to pain, it
          is amazing how Mustar Sensei can control you and you
          don't even feel his hands on you. You don't feel like
          you are pin down, but if you try to move is
          impossible. Sometimes the seniors are trying to be
          nice to the junior uke so I think it'll be alright if
          you just hold your position and let him know how much
          you as an uke want to be pushed. I think that the
          better our seniors become the better that we will
          become because they'll help us to get there. As to
          those of you that haven't seen Sensei Mustard yet, it
          is really worth it. Thanks.


          --- brendangrace8e <brendangrace8e@...> wrote:
          > Good day,
          > I am new to this group and was wondering if anyone
          > has ever moved
          > dojo's and had concerns about the difference's in
          > training. My last
          > dojo placed emphasis on being able to perform a
          > technique cleanly.
          > Uke would only move or tap if the technique or
          > control was
          > effective. If it wasn't we worked to help find the
          > missing
          > element. My new dojo doesn't place any emphasis on
          > this. Uke drops
          > and taps because they are expected to. It concerns
          > me that while I
          > am not a high kyu, very few of the senior students
          > can control me.
          > I don't mean I'm fighting them, just there is
          > nothing in their
          > technique to make me want to move, either from
          > skeletal lock
          > control, or from pain control (thinking nikajo
          > here). As I've only
          > attended one other dojo and attended 3 Kenshu's
          > (Mustard Sensie once-
          > awesome!) I don't know if I am too attached to one
          > way and need to
          > be more open minded. I've stuck with it for 6
          > months and feel my
          > Aikido is definately weaker, but there is no other
          > Yoshinkan dojo I
          > can attend. Suggestions or advise please.
          >
          > Brendan
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          __________________________________
          Do you Yahoo!?
          Yahoo! Search - Find what you’re looking for faster
          http://search.yahoo.com



          Yahoo! Groups Links






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.