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Fw: U.S. Defense Dept: Holocaust Remembrance Day Shows Life's Decisions Matter

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  • Cheryl Levine
    It is nice to know that the US Defense Department can recognize and give thought to this day. -c Cheryl B. Levine, Psy.D. Clinical and Consulting Psychologist
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 20, 2009
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      It is nice to know that the US Defense Department can recognize and give thought to this day.
      -c

      Cheryl B. Levine, Psy.D.
      Clinical and Consulting Psychologist
      Positive Perspectives, Inc.
      1130 Vester Avenue, Suite C
      Springfield, OH 45503
      937.390.3800
      937.390.3804 (fax)
      www.positiveperspectivescounseling.com

      The Ohio State University Rural Program
      Behavioral Scientist/Preceptor
      4879 US Route 68 South
      West Liberty, OH 43357
      937.465.0080
       


      --- On Mon, 4/20/09, Ken Pope <ken@...> wrote:
      From: Ken Pope <ken@...>
      Subject: U.S. Defense Dept: Holocaust Remembrance Day Shows Life's Decisions Matter
      To: "Ken Pope" <ken@...>
      Date: Monday, April 20, 2009, 5:30 PM

      The U.S. Department of Defense just issued the following news release:
      
      Holocaust Remembrance Day Shows Life's Decisions Matter, Mullen Says
      
      Mon, 20 Apr 2009 16:57:00 -0500
      
      The top U.S. military officer called on servicemembers to use Holocaust
      Remembrance Day observances this week as an opportunity to reflect on
      the responsibilities of life, reminding them that the decisions they
      make matter.
      
      "The story of the Holocaust, however ghastly, offers us an opportunity
      to reflect on the responsibilities in life," Navy Adm. Mike Mullen,
      chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in a message being aired on
      the Pentagon Channel.
      
      "It's a chance to remember that what we do - or choose not to do -
      really matters," he said.
      
      Mullen pointed to the example of Tibor Rubin, a Hungarian-born Holocaust
      survivor who went on to join the U.S. Army and earn the Medal of Honor
      for actions during the Korean War.
      
      "He lost his family to the Nazis and later managed to survive his own
      ordeal in a concentration camp," Mullen said, referring to Rubin's
      two-
      year confinement at the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria, before
      he was liberated by American troops at age 15.
      
      "After liberation, he became an American soldier and fought for his new
      country in the Korean War," Mullen said.
      
      A private first class, Rubin was assigned to the 1st Cavalry Division's
      8th Regiment, where records show an anti-Semitic noncommissioned officer
      often assigned him to the most dangerous missions.
      
      For his acts of bravery, including single-handedly defending a hill
      against North Korean soldiers for 24 hours so his company could safely
      retreat, Rubin was nominated three times for the Medal of Honor.
      
      The paperwork was never processed - again, because his bigoted NCO
      ignored orders to submit it, records show.
      
      Rubin was taken prisoner again, this time by Chinese troops in 1950. He
      spent 30 months in another prisoner-of-war camp, helping to sustain his
      fellow prisoners as they began to give up hope.
      
      As Mullen noted in his Holocaust Remembrance Day message, Rubin never
      learned to hate. "If you feel hate for your fellow man, you'll only
      hurt
      yourself," Mullen said, quoting Rubin.
      
      Rubin's actions in Korea finally received their long-overdue recognition
      when President George W. Bush presented him the Medal of Honor on Sept.
      23, 2005 -- more than 55 years after the fact.
      
      "But the honor is ours to have had him in our ranks," Mullen said of
      Rubin.
      
      The chairman encouraged servicemembers to recognize Rubin and others
      like him as they observe Holocaust Remembrance Day.
      
      "As we pause to remember the 6 million who perished, let us also pause
      to celebrate the lives of those who survived -- who went on to teach us
      the great responsibility of life itself," he said. "It matters what
      we do."
      
      Communities throughout the United States, Europe and Israel began
      commemorating the 44th Holocaust Remembrance Day yesterday, leading up
      to major observances around the world tomorrow.
      
      Ken Pope
      
      ACCESSIBILITY & DISABILITY RESOURCES FOR PSYCHOLOGY TRAINING &
      PRACTICE:
      <http://kpope.com>
      
      "I have tried to keep memory alive....  I have tried to fight those who
      would forget.  Because if we forget, we are guilty, we are accomplices."
      --Elie Wiesel
      
      
      
      
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