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Re: [yellowspringshavurah] My art on the news!

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  • Johanna
    And, Celia, I’m so glad that you and your grandchild could be part of it, and the kvelling! Johanna From: Celia Diamond Sent: Thursday, March 21, 2013 8:50
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 21, 2013
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      And, Celia, I’m so glad that you and your grandchild could be part of it, and the kvelling!
       
      Johanna
       
      Sent: Thursday, March 21, 2013 8:50 PM
      Subject: Re: [yellowspringshavurah] My art on the news!
       
       

      Mazel Tov and congrats!  No school anywhere has such a marvelous, colorful, student-and-artist-created sign!
      - Celia

      On Thu, Mar 21, 2013 at 8:37 AM, Johanna <rebiljoj@...> wrote:
       
      Friends and family:
       
      This piece was just on last night’s news about our town’s elementary school.  The piece opens with the view of the Mills Lawn School sign.  I made that sign with 70 5th graders last spring!  My art is on TV!!!
       
      Just had to share!
       
      Johanna
       
      http://www.whiotv.com/videos/news/yellow-springs-schools-promote-anti-bullying/vt4cd/

    • Celia Diamond
      Hi, Larry, thanks for asking. Indeed it s beautiful here, with lovely beaches, turquoise water, pleated green volcanic mountains. There is a Conservative
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
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        Hi, Larry, thanks for asking.  Indeed it's beautiful here, with lovely beaches, turquoise water, pleated green volcanic mountains.  There is a Conservative congregation I've joined, named Sof Ma' arav, that's rabbi-less.  Members do all the parts, and  there are some very knowledgeable  (and nice) people -- I've made friends there.  There's also a  larger Reform synagogue right next door.  The house we found is a good one for us -- two-story.  I'm on the ground floor,  my son's family on the second floor, with 3 bedrooms and a full bath on each floor.  Upstairs there's a full kitchen; I have a refrigerator, small counter, tiny sink, and a few cabinets that I've augmented with various pieces of my own furniture that have shelves & drawers.  We have a nice yard where my daughter-in-law can garden and a large covered area for our cars and kids' play.  The Kailua beach is gorgeous.  I do miss all the live classical music we have in the Dayton area, but there's a move on to revive the Honolulu Symphony, and I hope it happens.
        Long text message!  I hope to see you when I'm in town -- my planned stay includes a Havurah Shabbat.
        Happy Pesach!  Hi to everyone.
        Shalom,
        - Celia

        On Mar 21, 2013 4:57 PM, "Larry Turyn" <boismortier99@...> wrote:
         

        Hi, Celia,

        I look forward to seeing you in June.  I remember you wrote to the Havurah recently.  Remind me how you are doing in paradise.  Have you found a synagogue or Chavurah?  
        --Larry

      • jay rothman
        Happy Passover All, Love, Jay Peace in My Mind’s Eye Jay Rothman March 21, 2013 The Mind s-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery –
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
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          Happy Passover All, Love, Jay


          Peace in My Mind’s Eye

           

           Jay Rothman

          March 21, 2013

           

          The Mind's-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery can be a powerful source of insight. It merges the mind and the heart together in order to reconstruct memory, encounter reality and envision a future.

           

          In my mind's-eye, twenty years ago I am sitting in the White House Rose Garden, watching President Clinton pull Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat into the famous, now infamous, handshake. My heart leaped. "Finally, finally," I intoned to myself, recalling Rabin's words just moments before: "Enough of blood...enough of tears." In front of me, Henry Kissinger sat stony-faced. I imagined him saying to himself, "This is my worst nightmare...it will never work."

           

          Fast forward, this morning I get ready to sit in an audience watching another U.S. president. Like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I got a ticket.  As the first full-time Professor of Conflict Resolution in Israel, maybe it wasn't so much by chance. What President Obama will say, obviously, won't make much of a difference to war and peace here. But in my mind’s eye, he will speak to us directly and with passion, commitment, perhaps even love and, with that foundation, will demand and elicit sacrifices for peace. 

           

          I see myself telling President Obama at a private meeting after his speech: "This conflict fought over territory is, at its deepest core, about identity. You understand this first hand. It's about who we are - as Jews, as Palestinians, as the dispossessed and deeply rooted, as the proud and defeated, as the hopeful and terrified, as the strong and weak - all of us are all of those things, separately and together. It is a conflict that cannot be ‘resolved,’ if resolved means it will end and the past will be forgotten. We have done unspeakable things to each other; of course they must be spoken about. Forgive and forget is not suited to this part of the world. Nor can the conflict even be ‘managed’ if that means that a rational and coherent settlement is selected, implemented and maintained but is unable to settle the passions and keep them from erupting and ‘ruining the peace.’

           

          "However, Mr. President, as you know, peace is essential and therefore possible. Here's how: first we must set our sites lower than resolution but higher than management. In short, we must learn, as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, ‘to live together as brothers or die together as fools.’ How? By knowing that our conflicts will continue forever and still finding ways to engage them creatively. Just as two people in a relationship have differences that may be hard to reconcile, so our two peoples have differences that are impossible to bridge. And yet, the violence and destruction, the deepest hurts and hatreds can, I believe, be overcome. A new future of co-existence and interdependence is possible, and necessary, and with your active support and assistance, we will 'keep on keeping on.’"

           

          Now...I have returned from the speech and, of course, I didn't get the chance to say what my mind’s eye imagined. But I do believe Obama may have restarted the peace process tonight. For those who said he might step aside and let us fight it out ourselves, they were wrong. For those who said Obama empathizes deeply and understands the dignity of identity, as reflected in his own story and that of his own people, they were right.

           

          Peace, said Obama, is both necessary and possible. In my mind’s eye, I fully agree.

           

           

          Jay Rothman is a professor in The Program on Conflict Management, Resolution and Negotiation, Bar-Ilan University and author of From Identity-Based Conflict to Identity-Based Cooperation.

           

           

           

        • Len
          Jay, Excellent. And I hope you re right. Shalom, Len ... Jay, Excellent. And I hope you re right. Shalom, Len On Mar 22, 2013, at 1:29 AM, jay rothman
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
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            Jay,

            Excellent.  And I hope you're right. 

            Shalom,

            Len



            On Mar 22, 2013, at 1:29 AM, jay rothman <jrothman@...> wrote:

             

            Happy Passover All, Love, Jay



            Peace in My Mind’s Eye

             

             Jay Rothman

            March 21, 2013

             

            The Mind's-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery can be a powerful source of insight. It merges the mind and the heart together in order to reconstruct memory, encounter reality and envision a future.

             

            In my mind's-eye, twenty years ago I am sitting in the White House Rose Garden, watching President Clinton pull Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat into the famous, now infamous, handshake. My heart leaped. "Finally, finally," I intoned to myself, recalling Rabin's words just moments before: "Enough of blood...enough of tears." In front of me, Henry Kissinger sat stony-faced. I imagined him saying to himself, "This is my worst nightmare...it will never work."

             

            Fast forward, this morning I get ready to sit in an audience watching another U.S. president. Like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I got a ticket.  As the first full-time Professor of Conflict Resolution in Israel, maybe it wasn't so much by chance. What President Obama will say, obviously, won't make much of a difference to war and peace here. But in my mind’s eye, he will speak to us directly and with passion, commitment, perhaps even love and, with that foundation, will demand and elicit sacrifices for peace. 

             

            I see myself telling President Obama at a private meeting after his speech: "This conflict fought over territory is, at its deepest core, about identity. You understand this first hand. It's about who we are - as Jews, as Palestinians, as the dispossessed and deeply rooted, as the proud and defeated, as the hopeful and terrified, as the strong and weak - all of us are all of those things, separately and together. It is a conflict that cannot be ‘resolved,’ if resolved means it will end and the past will be forgotten. We have done unspeakable things to each other; of course they must be spoken about. Forgive and forget is not suited to this part of the world. Nor can the conflict even be ‘managed’ if that means that a rational and coherent settlement is selected, implemented and maintained but is unable to settle the passions and keep them from erupting and ‘ruining the peace.’

             

            "However, Mr. President, as you know, peace is essential and therefore possible. Here's how: first we must set our sites lower than resolution but higher than management. In short, we must learn, as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, ‘to live together as brothers or die together as fools.’ How? By knowing that our conflicts will continue forever and still finding ways to engage them creatively. Just as two people in a relationship have differences that may be hard to reconcile, so our two peoples have differences that are impossible to bridge. And yet, the violence and destruction, the deepest hurts and hatreds can, I believe, be overcome. A new future of co-existence and interdependence is possible, and necessary, and with your active support and assistance, we will 'keep on keeping on.’"

             

            Now...I have returned from the speech and, of course, I didn't get the chance to say what my mind’s eye imagined. But I do believe Obama may have restarted the peace process tonight. For those who said he might step aside and let us fight it out ourselves, they were wrong. For those who said Obama empathizes deeply and understands the dignity of identity, as reflected in his own story and that of his own people, they were right.

             

            Peace, said Obama, is both necessary and possible. In my mind’s eye, I fully agree.

             

             

            Jay Rothman is a professor in The Program on Conflict Management, Resolution and Negotiation, Bar-Ilan University and author of From Identity-Based Conflict to Identity-Based Cooperation.

             

             

             

          • David Seitz
            Amen ... -- David Seitz Professor of English Wright State University Dayton, OH 45435 937-775-3338 Amen On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 4:29 AM, jay rothman
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 22, 2013
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              Amen

              On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 4:29 AM, jay rothman <jrothman@...> wrote:
               

              Happy Passover All, Love, Jay



              Peace in My Mind’s Eye

               

               Jay Rothman

              March 21, 2013

               

              The Mind's-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery can be a powerful source of insight. It merges the mind and the heart together in order to reconstruct memory, encounter reality and envision a future.

               

              In my mind's-eye, twenty years ago I am sitting in the White House Rose Garden, watching President Clinton pull Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat into the famous, now infamous, handshake. My heart leaped. "Finally, finally," I intoned to myself, recalling Rabin's words just moments before: "Enough of blood...enough of tears." In front of me, Henry Kissinger sat stony-faced. I imagined him saying to himself, "This is my worst nightmare...it will never work."

               

              Fast forward, this morning I get ready to sit in an audience watching another U.S. president. Like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I got a ticket.  As the first full-time Professor of Conflict Resolution in Israel, maybe it wasn't so much by chance. What President Obama will say, obviously, won't make much of a difference to war and peace here. But in my mind’s eye, he will speak to us directly and with passion, commitment, perhaps even love and, with that foundation, will demand and elicit sacrifices for peace. 

               

              I see myself telling President Obama at a private meeting after his speech: "This conflict fought over territory is, at its deepest core, about identity. You understand this first hand. It's about who we are - as Jews, as Palestinians, as the dispossessed and deeply rooted, as the proud and defeated, as the hopeful and terrified, as the strong and weak - all of us are all of those things, separately and together. It is a conflict that cannot be ‘resolved,’ if resolved means it will end and the past will be forgotten. We have done unspeakable things to each other; of course they must be spoken about. Forgive and forget is not suited to this part of the world. Nor can the conflict even be ‘managed’ if that means that a rational and coherent settlement is selected, implemented and maintained but is unable to settle the passions and keep them from erupting and ‘ruining the peace.’

               

              "However, Mr. President, as you know, peace is essential and therefore possible. Here's how: first we must set our sites lower than resolution but higher than management. In short, we must learn, as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, ‘to live together as brothers or die together as fools.’ How? By knowing that our conflicts will continue forever and still finding ways to engage them creatively. Just as two people in a relationship have differences that may be hard to reconcile, so our two peoples have differences that are impossible to bridge. And yet, the violence and destruction, the deepest hurts and hatreds can, I believe, be overcome. A new future of co-existence and interdependence is possible, and necessary, and with your active support and assistance, we will 'keep on keeping on.’"

               

              Now...I have returned from the speech and, of course, I didn't get the chance to say what my mind’s eye imagined. But I do believe Obama may have restarted the peace process tonight. For those who said he might step aside and let us fight it out ourselves, they were wrong. For those who said Obama empathizes deeply and understands the dignity of identity, as reflected in his own story and that of his own people, they were right.

               

              Peace, said Obama, is both necessary and possible. In my mind’s eye, I fully agree.

               

               

              Jay Rothman is a professor in The Program on Conflict Management, Resolution and Negotiation, Bar-Ilan University and author of From Identity-Based Conflict to Identity-Based Cooperation.

               

               

               




              --
              David Seitz
              Professor of English
              Wright State University
              Dayton, OH 45435
              937-775-3338
            • Celia Diamond
              How beautiful, Jay, and how apt. May it be so! Shabbat Shalom, Happy Pesach. Next year in Jerusalem, and there you, Randy, and some (at least) of your
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 23, 2013
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                How beautiful, Jay, and how apt.  May it be so!
                Shabbat Shalom, Happy Pesach.  "Next year in Jerusalem," and there you, Randy, and some (at least) of your family are!
                Love to all, I miss you,
                - Celia

                On Mar 21, 2013 10:20 PM, "jay rothman" <jrothman@...> wrote:
                 

                Happy Passover All, Love, Jay



                Peace in My Mind’s Eye

                 

                 Jay Rothman

                March 21, 2013

                 

                The Mind's-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery can be a powerful source of insight. It merges the mind and the heart together in order to reconstruct memory, encounter reality and envision a future.

                 

                In my mind's-eye, twenty years ago I am sitting in the White House Rose Garden, watching President Clinton pull Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat into the famous, now infamous, handshake. My heart leaped. "Finally, finally," I intoned to myself, recalling Rabin's words just moments before: "Enough of blood...enough of tears." In front of me, Henry Kissinger sat stony-faced. I imagined him saying to himself, "This is my worst nightmare...it will never work."

                 

                Fast forward, this morning I get ready to sit in an audience watching another U.S. president. Like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I got a ticket.  As the first full-time Professor of Conflict Resolution in Israel, maybe it wasn't so much by chance. What President Obama will say, obviously, won't make much of a difference to war and peace here. But in my mind’s eye, he will speak to us directly and with passion, commitment, perhaps even love and, with that foundation, will demand and elicit sacrifices for peace. 

                 

                I see myself telling President Obama at a private meeting after his speech: "This conflict fought over territory is, at its deepest core, about identity. You understand this first hand. It's about who we are - as Jews, as Palestinians, as the dispossessed and deeply rooted, as the proud and defeated, as the hopeful and terrified, as the strong and weak - all of us are all of those things, separately and together. It is a conflict that cannot be ‘resolved,’ if resolved means it will end and the past will be forgotten. We have done unspeakable things to each other; of course they must be spoken about. Forgive and forget is not suited to this part of the world. Nor can the conflict even be ‘managed’ if that means that a rational and coherent settlement is selected, implemented and maintained but is unable to settle the passions and keep them from erupting and ‘ruining the peace.’

                 

                "However, Mr. President, as you know, peace is essential and therefore possible. Here's how: first we must set our sites lower than resolution but higher than management. In short, we must learn, as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, ‘to live together as brothers or die together as fools.’ How? By knowing that our conflicts will continue forever and still finding ways to engage them creatively. Just as two people in a relationship have differences that may be hard to reconcile, so our two peoples have differences that are impossible to bridge. And yet, the violence and destruction, the deepest hurts and hatreds can, I believe, be overcome. A new future of co-existence and interdependence is possible, and necessary, and with your active support and assistance, we will 'keep on keeping on.’"

                 

                Now...I have returned from the speech and, of course, I didn't get the chance to say what my mind’s eye imagined. But I do believe Obama may have restarted the peace process tonight. For those who said he might step aside and let us fight it out ourselves, they were wrong. For those who said Obama empathizes deeply and understands the dignity of identity, as reflected in his own story and that of his own people, they were right.

                 

                Peace, said Obama, is both necessary and possible. In my mind’s eye, I fully agree.

                 

                 

                Jay Rothman is a professor in The Program on Conflict Management, Resolution and Negotiation, Bar-Ilan University and author of From Identity-Based Conflict to Identity-Based Cooperation.

                 

                 

                 

              • nncparent
                Peace in My Minds Eye and a Shard of Glass in My Ear... I want to feel and sense and know that peace will stay in my minds eye. I want to
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 23, 2013
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                  Peace in My Minds Eye and a Shard of Glass in My Ear...

                  I want to feel and sense and know that peace will stay in my minds eye. I want to see it and taste it for Israel and for Palestine, for real. Is it true that we breath in and lose thought of what we say? What comes out of the collective tongue is talk but not real action.

                  Good deeds show proof and hate filled words are like a shard of glass pierced into my eardrum shattering the hope of peace. If we can't correct la shon hara how will we hear goodness?

                  Listen to words spoken, and if filled with bitterness, take the time to make a teachable moment to erase the old voice and create a new stronger one. Stereotypes about Jews, stereotypes about Arabs could be extinguished if no one was listening.

                  Listen to the heritage of hate and erase the rhetoric so our ears wont be damaged. Deafness keeps us separate,
                  from one another from ourselves. Hearing takes on a more crisp face knowing we can block the vernacular of hate. Peace, in my minds eye, must be linked with ears that hear only sweetness.

                  We all have so much work to do to erase evil. Ellie Wiesel says: " The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference." For Pesach may we all recognize that each of us has the spark of the infinite within, and may we cancel out the scratching on the chalkboard and usher in kind words.

                  I like Jay's perspective, but in my minds eye I also need functional ears. We must be able to listen to the goodness to promote change. Rise up from indifference and listen for peace too.

                  Nance



                  Sent from Yahoo! Mail for iPhone

                  Sent from Yahoo! Mail for iPhone


                  From: jay rothman <jrothman@...>;
                  To: <yellowspringshavurah@yahoogroups.com>;
                  Subject: [yellowspringshavurah] passover and peace in Jerusalem
                  Sent: Fri, Mar 22, 2013 8:29:54 AM

                   

                  Happy Passover All, Love, Jay



                  Peace in My Mind’s Eye

                   

                   Jay Rothman

                  March 21, 2013

                   

                  The Mind's-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery can be a powerful source of insight. It merges the mind and the heart together in order to reconstruct memory, encounter reality and envision a future.

                   

                  In my mind's-eye, twenty years ago I am sitting in the White House Rose Garden, watching President Clinton pull Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat into the famous, now infamous, handshake. My heart leaped. "Finally, finally," I intoned to myself, recalling Rabin's words just moments before: "Enough of blood...enough of tears." In front of me, Henry Kissinger sat stony-faced. I imagined him saying to himself, "This is my worst nightmare...it will never work."

                   

                  Fast forward, this morning I get ready to sit in an audience watching another U.S. president. Like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I got a ticket.  As the first full-time Professor of Conflict Resolution in Israel, maybe it wasn't so much by chance. What President Obama will say, obviously, won't make much of a difference to war and peace here. But in my mind’s eye, he will speak to us directly and with passion, commitment, perhaps even love and, with that foundation, will demand and elicit sacrifices for peace. 

                   

                  I see myself telling President Obama at a private meeting after his speech: "This conflict fought over territory is, at its deepest core, about identity. You understand this first hand. It's about who we are - as Jews, as Palestinians, as the dispossessed and deeply rooted, as the proud and defeated, as the hopeful and terrified, as the strong and weak - all of us are all of those things, separately and together. It is a conflict that cannot be ‘resolved,’ if resolved means it will end and the past will be forgotten. We have done unspeakable things to each other; of course they must be spoken about. Forgive and forget is not suited to this part of the world. Nor can the conflict even be ‘managed’ if that means that a rational and coherent settlement is selected, implemented and maintained but is unable to settle the passions and keep them from erupting and ‘ruining the peace.’

                   

                  "However, Mr. President, as you know, peace is essential and therefore possible. Here's how: first we must set our sites lower than resolution but higher than management. In short, we must learn, as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, ‘to live together as brothers or die together as fools.’ How? By knowing that our conflicts will continue forever and still finding ways to engage them creatively. Just as two people in a relationship have differences that may be hard to reconcile, so our two peoples have differences that are impossible to bridge. And yet, the violence and destruction, the deepest hurts and hatreds can, I believe, be overcome. A new future of co-existence and interdependence is possible, and necessary, and with your active support and assistance, we will 'keep on keeping on.’"

                   

                  Now...I have returned from the speech and, of course, I didn't get the chance to say what my mind’s eye imagined. But I do believe Obama may have restarted the peace process tonight. For those who said he might step aside and let us fight it out ourselves, they were wrong. For those who said Obama empathizes deeply and understands the dignity of identity, as reflected in his own story and that of his own people, they were right.

                   

                  Peace, said Obama, is both necessary and possible. In my mind’s eye, I fully agree.

                   

                   

                  Jay Rothman is a professor in The Program on Conflict Management, Resolution and Negotiation, Bar-Ilan University and author of From Identity-Based Conflict to Identity-Based Cooperation.

                   

                   

                   

                • Cheryl Levine
                  Amen, amen to you both. Keyn yehi ratzon! Chag Pesach Sameach!! Fondly, -c   Cheryl B. Levine, Psy.D. Positive Perspectives, Inc.   Clinical and Consulting
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 23, 2013
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                    Amen, amen to you both.
                    Keyn yehi ratzon!
                    Chag Pesach Sameach!!
                    Fondly,
                    -c

                     

                    Cheryl B. Levine, Psy.D.
                    Positive Perspectives, Inc.  
                    Clinical and Consulting Psychologist, Partner 

                    1130 Vester Avenue, Suite C
                    Springfield, OH 45503 

                    680 E. Dayton Yellow Springs Road
                    Fairborn, OH 45324 
                     

                    937.390.3800
                    937.390.3804 (fax)
                    www.positiveperspectivescounseling.com 

                    Email is not secure,
                    may not be read every day,
                    and should not be used for urgent concerns. 


                     


                    From: "nncparent@..." <nncparent@...>
                    To: "jrothman@..." <jrothman@...>; "yellowspringshavurah@yahoogroups.com" <yellowspringshavurah@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 1:03 PM
                    Subject: RE: [yellowspringshavurah] passover and peace in Jerusalem

                     


                    Peace in My Minds Eye and a Shard of Glass in My Ear...

                    I want to feel and sense and know that peace will stay in my minds eye. I want to see it and taste it for Israel and for Palestine, for real. Is it true that we breath in and lose thought of what we say? What comes out of the collective tongue is talk but not real action.

                    Good deeds show proof and hate filled words are like a shard of glass pierced into my eardrum shattering the hope of peace. If we can't correct la shon hara how will we hear goodness?

                    Listen to words spoken, and if filled with bitterness, take the time to make a teachable moment to erase the old voice and create a new stronger one. Stereotypes about Jews, stereotypes about Arabs could be extinguished if no one was listening.

                    Listen to the heritage of hate and erase the rhetoric so our ears wont be damaged. Deafness keeps us separate,
                    from one another from ourselves. Hearing takes on a more crisp face knowing we can block the vernacular of hate. Peace, in my minds eye, must be linked with ears that hear only sweetness.

                    We all have so much work to do to erase evil. Ellie Wiesel says: " The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference." For Pesach may we all recognize that each of us has the spark of the infinite within, and may we cancel out the scratching on the chalkboard and usher in kind words.

                    I like Jay's perspective, but in my minds eye I also need functional ears. We must be able to listen to the goodness to promote change. Rise up from indifference and listen for peace too.

                    Nance



                    Sent from Yahoo! Mail for iPhone

                    Sent from Yahoo! Mail for iPhone


                    From: jay rothman <jrothman@...>;
                    To: <yellowspringshavurah@yahoogroups.com>;
                    Subject: [yellowspringshavurah] passover and peace in Jerusalem
                    Sent: Fri, Mar 22, 2013 8:29:54 AM

                     
                    Happy Passover All, Love, Jay


                    Peace in My Mind’s Eye
                     
                     Jay Rothman
                    March 21, 2013
                     
                    The Mind's-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery can be a powerful source of insight. It merges the mind and the heart together in order to reconstruct memory, encounter reality and envision a future.
                     
                    In my mind's-eye, twenty years ago I am sitting in the White House Rose Garden, watching President Clinton pull Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat into the famous, now infamous, handshake. My heart leaped. "Finally, finally," I intoned to myself, recalling Rabin's words just moments before: "Enough of blood...enough of tears." In front of me, Henry Kissinger sat stony-faced. I imagined him saying to himself, "This is my worst nightmare...it will never work."
                     
                    Fast forward, this morning I get ready to sit in an audience watching another U.S. president. Like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I got a ticket.  As the first full-time Professor of Conflict Resolution in Israel, maybe it wasn't so much by chance. What President Obama will say, obviously, won't make much of a difference to war and peace here. But in my mind’s eye, he will speak to us directly and with passion, commitment, perhaps even love and, with that foundation, will demand and elicit sacrifices for peace. 
                     
                    I see myself telling President Obama at a private meeting after his speech: "This conflict fought over territory is, at its deepest core, about identity. You understand this first hand. It's about who we are - as Jews, as Palestinians, as the dispossessed and deeply rooted, as the proud and defeated, as the hopeful and terrified, as the strong and weak - all of us are all of those things, separately and together. It is a conflict that cannot be ‘resolved,’ if resolved means it will end and the past will be forgotten. We have done unspeakable things to each other; of course they must be spoken about. Forgive and forget is not suited to this part of the world. Nor can the conflict even be ‘managed’ if that means that a rational and coherent settlement is selected, implemented and maintained but is unable to settle the passions and keep them from erupting and ‘ruining the peace.’
                     
                    "However, Mr. President, as you know, peace is essential and therefore possible. Here's how: first we must set our sites lower than resolution but higher than management. In short, we must learn, as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, ‘to live together as brothers or die together as fools.’ How? By knowing that our conflicts will continue forever and still finding ways to engage them creatively. Just as two people in a relationship have differences that may be hard to reconcile, so our two peoples have differences that are impossible to bridge. And yet, the violence and destruction, the deepest hurts and hatreds can, I believe, be overcome. A new future of co-existence and interdependence is possible, and necessary, and with your active support and assistance, we will 'keep on keeping on.’"
                     
                    Now...I have returned from the speech and, of course, I didn't get the chance to say what my mind’s eye imagined. But I do believe Obama may have restarted the peace process tonight. For those who said he might step aside and let us fight it out ourselves, they were wrong. For those who said Obama empathizes deeply and understands the dignity of identity, as reflected in his own story and that of his own people, they were right.
                     
                    Peace, said Obama, is both necessary and possible. In my mind’s eye, I fully agree.
                     
                     
                    Jay Rothman is a professor in The Program on Conflict Management, Resolution and Negotiation, Bar-Ilan University and author of From Identity-Based Conflict to Identity-Based Cooperation.
                     
                     
                     


                  • Larry Turyn
                    Well done. Jay.  I think you have shown us a realistic optimism for peace.--Larry Turyn ... From: jay rothman Subject:
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 24, 2013
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                      Well done. Jay.  I think you have shown us a realistic optimism for peace.
                      --Larry Turyn

                      --- On Fri, 3/22/13, jay rothman <jrothman@...> wrote:

                      From: jay rothman <jrothman@...>
                      Subject: [yellowspringshavurah] passover and peace in Jerusalem
                      To: yellowspringshavurah@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Friday, March 22, 2013, 4:29 AM

                       

                      Happy Passover All, Love, Jay



                      Peace in My Mind’s Eye

                       

                       Jay Rothman

                      March 21, 2013

                       

                      The Mind's-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery can be a powerful source of insight. It merges the mind and the heart together in order to reconstruct memory, encounter reality and envision a future.

                       

                      In my mind's-eye, twenty years ago I am sitting in the White House Rose Garden, watching President Clinton pull Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat into the famous, now infamous, handshake. My heart leaped. "Finally, finally," I intoned to myself, recalling Rabin's words just moments before: "Enough of blood...enough of tears." In front of me, Henry Kissinger sat stony-faced. I imagined him saying to himself, "This is my worst nightmare...it will never work."

                       

                      Fast forward, this morning I get ready to sit in an audience watching another U.S. president. Like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I got a ticket.  As the first full-time Professor of Conflict Resolution in Israel, maybe it wasn't so much by chance. What President Obama will say, obviously, won't make much of a difference to war and peace here. But in my mind’s eye, he will speak to us directly and with passion, commitment, perhaps even love and, with that foundation, will demand and elicit sacrifices for peace. 

                       

                      I see myself telling President Obama at a private meeting after his speech: "This conflict fought over territory is, at its deepest core, about identity. You understand this first hand. It's about who we are - as Jews, as Palestinians, as the dispossessed and deeply rooted, as the proud and defeated, as the hopeful and terrified, as the strong and weak - all of us are all of those things, separately and together. It is a conflict that cannot be ‘resolved,’ if resolved means it will end and the past will be forgotten. We have done unspeakable things to each other; of course they must be spoken about. Forgive and forget is not suited to this part of the world. Nor can the conflict even be ‘managed’ if that means that a rational and coherent settlement is selected, implemented and maintained but is unable to settle the passions and keep them from erupting and ‘ruining the peace.’

                       

                      "However, Mr. President, as you know, peace is essential and therefore possible. Here's how: first we must set our sites lower than resolution but higher than management. In short, we must learn, as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, ‘to live together as brothers or die together as fools.’ How? By knowing that our conflicts will continue forever and still finding ways to engage them creatively. Just as two people in a relationship have differences that may be hard to reconcile, so our two peoples have differences that are impossible to bridge. And yet, the violence and destruction, the deepest hurts and hatreds can, I believe, be overcome. A new future of co-existence and interdependence is possible, and necessary, and with your active support and assistance, we will 'keep on keeping on.’"

                       

                      Now...I have returned from the speech and, of course, I didn't get the chance to say what my mind’s eye imagined. But I do believe Obama may have restarted the peace process tonight. For those who said he might step aside and let us fight it out ourselves, they were wrong. For those who said Obama empathizes deeply and understands the dignity of identity, as reflected in his own story and that of his own people, they were right.

                       

                      Peace, said Obama, is both necessary and possible. In my mind’s eye, I fully agree.

                       

                       

                      Jay Rothman is a professor in The Program on Conflict Management, Resolution and Negotiation, Bar-Ilan University and author of From Identity-Based Conflict to Identity-Based Cooperation.

                       

                       

                       

                    • jay rothman
                      thanks larry. have a great passover. jesse s on his way. liana is here and of course so is mori since he lives here. so we ll all be together. ... thanks
                      Message 10 of 13 , Mar 24, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        thanks larry. have a great passover. jesse's on his way. liana is here and of course so is mori since he lives here. so we'll all be together. 

                        On Mar 24, 2013, at 7:06 PM, Larry Turyn wrote:

                         

                        Well done. Jay.  I think you have shown us a realistic optimism for peace.
                        --Larry Turyn

                        --- On Fri, 3/22/13, jay rothman <jrothman@...> wrote:

                        From: jay rothman <jrothman@...>
                        Subject: [yellowspringshavurah] passover and peace in Jerusalem
                        To: yellowspringshavurah@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Friday, March 22, 2013, 4:29 AM

                         

                        Happy Passover All, Love, Jay



                        Peace in My Mind’s Eye

                         

                         Jay Rothman

                        March 21, 2013

                         

                        The Mind's-eye – the human ability to experience visual mental imagery can be a powerful source of insight. It merges the mind and the heart together in order to reconstruct memory, encounter reality and envision a future.

                         

                        In my mind's-eye, twenty years ago I am sitting in the White House Rose Garden, watching President Clinton pull Prime Minister Rabin and Chairman Arafat into the famous, now infamous, handshake. My heart leaped. "Finally, finally," I intoned to myself, recalling Rabin's words just moments before: "Enough of blood...enough of tears." In front of me, Henry Kissinger sat stony-faced. I imagined him saying to himself, "This is my worst nightmare...it will never work."

                         

                        Fast forward, this morning I get ready to sit in an audience watching another U.S. president. Like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, I got a ticket.  As the first full-time Professor of Conflict Resolution in Israel, maybe it wasn't so much by chance. What President Obama will say, obviously, won't make much of a difference to war and peace here. But in my mind’s eye, he will speak to us directly and with passion, commitment, perhaps even love and, with that foundation, will demand and elicit sacrifices for peace. 

                         

                        I see myself telling President Obama at a private meeting after his speech: "This conflict fought over territory is, at its deepest core, about identity. You understand this first hand. It's about who we are - as Jews, as Palestinians, as the dispossessed and deeply rooted, as the proud and defeated, as the hopeful and terrified, as the strong and weak - all of us are all of those things, separately and together. It is a conflict that cannot be ‘resolved,’ if resolved means it will end and the past will be forgotten. We have done unspeakable things to each other; of course they must be spoken about. Forgive and forget is not suited to this part of the world. Nor can the conflict even be ‘managed’ if that means that a rational and coherent settlement is selected, implemented and maintained but is unable to settle the passions and keep them from erupting and ‘ruining the peace.’

                         

                        "However, Mr. President, as you know, peace is essential and therefore possible. Here's how: first we must set our sites lower than resolution but higher than management. In short, we must learn, as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, ‘to live together as brothers or die together as fools.’ How? By knowing that our conflicts will continue forever and still finding ways to engage them creatively. Just as two people in a relationship have differences that may be hard to reconcile, so our two peoples have differences that are impossible to bridge. And yet, the violence and destruction, the deepest hurts and hatreds can, I believe, be overcome. A new future of co-existence and interdependence is possible, and necessary, and with your active support and assistance, we will 'keep on keeping on.’"

                         

                        Now...I have returned from the speech and, of course, I didn't get the chance to say what my mind’s eye imagined. But I do believe Obama may have restarted the peace process tonight. For those who said he might step aside and let us fight it out ourselves, they were wrong. For those who said Obama empathizes deeply and understands the dignity of identity, as reflected in his own story and that of his own people, they were right.

                         

                        Peace, said Obama, is both necessary and possible. In my mind’s eye, I fully agree.

                         

                         

                        Jay Rothman is a professor in The Program on Conflict Management, Resolution and Negotiation, Bar-Ilan University and author of From Identity-Based Conflict to Identity-Based Cooperation.

                         

                         

                         


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