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To get a Yankee 30?

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  • Chris Campbell
    Hi group, I m just about to sell my current boat, and am looking around for the next one - part of my coping mechanism for letting this one go, actually. I
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 11, 2008
      Hi group,

      I'm just about to sell my current boat, and am looking around for the
      next one - part of my coping mechanism for letting this one go,
      actually. I don't want to be boatless for long!

      I have long admired the Yankee 30, in fact I looked at Mae McGrath on
      the same boat hunting trip that netted me my current boat. I did like
      the Yankee, but I liked the LeComte Northeast 38 I bought better at
      the time - now I've realized that I'd rather not pay for that big a
      boat, so I'm selling to downsize, and I'm back to looking at Yankee
      30's, among other boats.

      I'm hoping I can impose on you for some honest opinions - naturally
      difficult for a group of people who obviously love their boats, but
      you folks know them better than anyone, so who better to ask?

      The Yankee 30's are all getting pretty old now (although there are the
      Heritage Boat Works boats that are about 10 years younger) - are any
      of you noticing problems due to aging? I don't mean crazing gelcoat or
      fittings wearing or rigging needing replacement, but structural
      issues. Are the boats softening over time, and starting to flex? Are
      the hull/deck joints beginning to fail, and requiring significant
      maintenance? Are the keel bolts in need of replacement? Are any of
      them showing signs of delamination in the hull? I'm sure there are
      delaminating decks - impossible to avoid with cored construction, but
      I'm not as worried about that, fixing them is a pain, but not that
      difficult. Hulls are another story, though. I know that Yankee had
      some of the best construction techniques in the business, so I expect
      that problems are few - but I'd like to know if anyone's had any
      difficulties yet.

      When I looked at the Mae McGrath I was surprised with how tight the
      cabin felt - especially given that she didn't have that large a
      cockpit. I guess the narrow beam and even narrower ends doesn't leave
      much room for accommodation. I think I can live with that, but would
      love to hear how people feel about them. Do you cruise (2-3 week
      summer cruise type of thing) and do you find you've got ample space
      for what you bring along? I ask since we find that we load our 38
      footer down pretty heavily for two of us for our annual cruise, so I'm
      curious about how people feel about the Yankee. How does she feel on
      deck under way? Is going forward in a blow to reef the main
      comfortable? Are the side decks large enough to move on? Are the
      shrouds in the way of getting forward so you need to jump onto the
      cabin top and back down once past them? Again, I've being spoiled by
      very large side decks and a heavy boat's motion.

      Everything I read about the way they sail excites me - the thought of
      enjoying going to weather in a blow is really amazing! How about their
      helm? If I get a tiller steered one will the weather helm sometimes
      tire my arm out? I find the Northeast 38 develops weather helm if I
      don't reef soon enough when going to weather and when broad reaching -
      how does the Yankee 30 do under those conditions? Does she sail well
      under autopilot? Weathervane? How wet are they to sail in 25 knots?
      How hard is it to fit a dodger with the mainsheet where it is?

      How are they for single handing with a wheel or with a tiller? My
      Northeast has the main and jibsheets coming right to the wheel, so I
      don't need to move or stretch to sail on my own. The jib's roller
      furling is lead right to the helmsman also. Are the Yankee 30's set up
      conveniently for singlehanding also?

      I understand that backing to port is impossible - that's too bad, but
      no showstopper, with a full keel and attached rudder, I'm used to
      essentially having no control in reverse under power anyway. Being
      able to turn to starboard under power will open up all kinds of new
      possibilities for me! Is having the engine in the middle of the saloon
      a drag for any reason, or is the accessibility of it and the centering
      of the weight in the boat great, with no downsides? How about noise
      down below under power? From the cockpit? I guess boats with Atomic
      IVs are likely quieter, with diesels noisier. Is there room for sound
      insulation without major modification?

      I could probably go on all day asking questions, but this has already
      become a lot to read, and a lot to ask of a group of people. Hopefully
      some of you will have time to respond - I truly appreciate any input
      you can provide me with.

      I'm also about to be in the market, on the East coast, if anyone knows
      of a boat for sale or that I can look at to learn more about what
      they're like.

      Thanks!

      Chris
    • Jerry Thompson
      Hi Chris, I am the owner of Jericho hull # 132, the last Yankee thirty built. I hope I didn t get the best boat built because if I did I pity the rest! I have
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 14, 2008
        Hi Chris,

        I am the owner of Jericho hull # 132, the last Yankee thirty
        built. I hope I didn't get the best boat built because if I did I
        pity the rest!

        I have owned Jericho for a little over a year now and have sailed her
        a lot and spent nearly 800 hours on a re-fit. While I am not ready
        to give a detailed report as of yet I would be glad to e-mail it to
        you or it will be available here when I post.

        Over all a good boat with some major issues. I don't think the glass
        is all that good as the gelcoat is very brittle and cracking (not
        crazing) from the flex in the hull.

        The fore and backstay chainplates and the glass they go into are weak
        The transom is very weak unless reinforced. I would be scared of
        taking a breaking wave over the stern.

        The deck to hull joint is a joke. On Jericho, most of the joint was
        broken loose. It was glued down on the gelcoated hull and that
        doesn't work. Most of the screws missed, and the whole thing flexed
        like crazy.

        The transom to deck joint was not even caulked and was trimmed over
        by a piece of teak.

        The cockpit coaming is not heavy enough to take the winches.

        The halyard winches need to be on the dog house roof for blue water
        sailing.

        Still needs more winches as I wish to be able to go from one
        spinnaker to the other while under way.

        There is a dearth of pad eyes forward for spinnaker work.

        The original 1-inch track for the jib sheet is not in a good position
        and not long enough for oversize headsails.

        I am putting on Aluminum toe-rail to help with the above issues.

        They back just fine to port; you need to learn how to do it. Get
        some way on the boat; shift into neutral and then the boat will
        follow the rudder with no problem.

        Sure she is small below. She is a narrow beam and low freeboard
        design.

        Jericho is a bitch to sail. She either flies or is a dog when she
        gets a little out of trim. Not a forgiving boat if you want to sail
        lazy.

        Jerry
      • Michael Mitchell
        Jerry, I m sorry that your Yankee is such a problem. I owned Independence, Hull # 1, laid down in 1971. She has none of the problems you describe. Somewhere
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 14, 2008
          Jerry,
          I'm sorry that your Yankee is such a problem.  I owned Independence, Hull # 1, laid down in 1971.  She has none of the problems you describe.  Somewhere along the line, someone converted her to wheel steering.  She sails great in all kinds of weather.  I really enjoyed sailing her while I had her.
          Mike Mitchell

          On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 9:40 PM, Jerry Thompson <um_saudade@...> wrote:

          Hi Chris,

          I am the owner of Jericho hull # 132, the last Yankee thirty
          built. I hope I didn't get the best boat built because if I did I
          pity the rest!

          I have owned Jericho for a little over a year now and have sailed her
          a lot and spent nearly 800 hours on a re-fit. While I am not ready
          to give a detailed report as of yet I would be glad to e-mail it to
          you or it will be available here when I post.

          Over all a good boat with some major issues. I don't think the glass
          is all that good as the gelcoat is very brittle and cracking (not
          crazing) from the flex in the hull.

          The fore and backstay chainplates and the glass they go into are weak
          The transom is very weak unless reinforced. I would be scared of
          taking a breaking wave over the stern.

          The deck to hull joint is a joke. On Jericho, most of the joint was
          broken loose. It was glued down on the gelcoated hull and that
          doesn't work. Most of the screws missed, and the whole thing flexed
          like crazy.

          The transom to deck joint was not even caulked and was trimmed over
          by a piece of teak.

          The cockpit coaming is not heavy enough to take the winches.

          The halyard winches need to be on the dog house roof for blue water
          sailing.

          Still needs more winches as I wish to be able to go from one
          spinnaker to the other while under way.

          There is a dearth of pad eyes forward for spinnaker work.

          The original 1-inch track for the jib sheet is not in a good position
          and not long enough for oversize headsails.

          I am putting on Aluminum toe-rail to help with the above issues.

          They back just fine to port; you need to learn how to do it. Get
          some way on the boat; shift into neutral and then the boat will
          follow the rudder with no problem.

          Sure she is small below. She is a narrow beam and low freeboard
          design.

          Jericho is a bitch to sail. She either flies or is a dog when she
          gets a little out of trim. Not a forgiving boat if you want to sail
          lazy.

          Jerry


        • jsdozy
          I have owned hull #46 (1971 MkI) since 1994. It exhibits none of the problems that are attributed to Jericho. The hull-to-deck joint is secure and dry. It is
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 14, 2008
            I have owned hull #46 (1971 MkI) since 1994. It exhibits none of the problems that are attributed to Jericho. The hull-to-deck joint is secure and dry. It is through-bolted every six inches. The toe rail is screw-fastened. The transom is robust and sound. The fore and aft chainplates are robust and secure. The genoa track is ten feet long. I have a 135. It should accept at least a 150 qnd possibly a 165. The rudder stock and keelbolts are silicon bronze, not stainless and as such are not susceptible to crevice corrosion. To the best of my knowledge there have been no documented failures of either rudder stock or keel bolts. My boat was severely dicked with by several moron previous owners before I got her, but I must say that she weathered her mistreatment with characteristic aplomb. About two years ago I rebedded all deck hardware from stancions to genoa track and found virtually no evidence of moist balsa deck core even though the original bedding was thirty-five years old. I did have one problem with deck core aft of the cockpit coaming due to failed bedding of the aluminum trim strip covering the hull-to-deck joint. Several owners have had problems with the cabin top flexing as halyards are tensioned through turning blocks or deck organizers near the mast. The bulkheads on Hull #46 are screw-fastened to the hull in that area and do not exhibit that problem. Most of my lines lead aft to the cabin top on either side of the companionway. They do not interfere with the dodger. The sheet winch bases are robust and the coamings do not flex under load. The side decks are narrow but it is not necessary to climb up onto the cabin top to get around the shrouds. My gelcoat was was crazed but not cracked from stress. I sanded through the crazing prior to painting and found no issues. The hull is virtually blister-free except for a few gelcoat blisters below the waterline about the diameter of a pencil eraser and half as deep as the gelcoat.  I have no problems with excessive weather helm. She trims easily and will sail herself for minutes at a time if properly balanced. The engine location is in my opinion unsurpassed for access. The engine cover and bilge cover lift away and provide easy access from flywheel to stern tube. The engine compartment is tight as a result - the cover fits like the proverbial glove - and it is a bit noisy below with the engine running. The interior is a bit cramped - it's not a modern layout, but the narrow beam contributes to stiffness, as does the 47% ballast/displacement ratio. The V-berth will easily accept anyone under 6'4". My opinion is that the Yankee has at least the storage and possibly more than other thirty footers of the same vintage - Pearson, Cal, etc. The early 70's Tartan 30 is a close relative and you might want to take a look at one of those to get a feel for the interior of the Yankee. Also remember that the Yankee was roughly twice the price of a similar vintage Pearson or equivalent. The icebox is large but poorly insulated.  One thing I find handy is the settee seat back flips up. The original design intent was to provide a sort of bunk bed arrangement for the settee, but I use the seat back as a workbench. A six foot long foot-and-a-half wide workbench is something that owners of many 50 foot boats would kill for, no? Frankly, I was a bit surprised to hear about Jericho's issues until I considered that she was the last hull built. It would seem likely that employees were aware of the imminent demise of Yankee Yachts well before the fact and in retrospect it might not be outside the realm of possibility to expect that the last hull would be slap-dashed together. (Or even the last five or ten hulls for that matter) If I had to do it all over again I would buy a MK 1 before a ll or a lll. I personally didn't care for the philosophy of adding a little mast height here, a little more ballast there, and otherwise trying to fix a design that was't broke but that's just my opinion. I very well might be wrong about that but I do know and can say without reservation that Mkl Hull #46 is a stout well built and designed boat that I would take offshore with complete confidence.
             
            JS
             
             
             
             
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2008 8:54 PM
            Subject: Re: [yankee30] Re: To get a Yankee 30?

            Jerry,
            I'm sorry that your Yankee is such a problem.  I owned Independence, Hull # 1, laid down in 1971.  She has none of the problems you describe.  Somewhere along the line, someone converted her to wheel steering.  She sails great in all kinds of weather.  I really enjoyed sailing her while I had her.
            Mike Mitchell

            On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 9:40 PM, Jerry Thompson <um_saudade@yahoo. com> wrote:

            Hi Chris,

            I am the owner of Jericho hull # 132, the last Yankee thirty
            built. I hope I didn't get the best boat built because if I did I
            pity the rest!

            I have owned Jericho for a little over a year now and have sailed her
            a lot and spent nearly 800 hours on a re-fit. While I am not ready
            to give a detailed report as of yet I would be glad to e-mail it to
            you or it will be available here when I post.

            Over all a good boat with some major issues. I don't think the glass
            is all that good as the gelcoat is very brittle and cracking (not
            crazing) from the flex in the hull.

            The fore and backstay chainplates and the glass they go into are weak
            The transom is very weak unless reinforced. I would be scared of
            taking a breaking wave over the stern.

            The deck to hull joint is a joke. On Jericho, most of the joint was
            broken loose. It was glued down on the gelcoated hull and that
            doesn't work. Most of the screws missed, and the whole thing flexed
            like crazy.

            The transom to deck joint was not even caulked and was trimmed over
            by a piece of teak.

            The cockpit coaming is not heavy enough to take the winches.

            The halyard winches need to be on the dog house roof for blue water
            sailing.

            Still needs more winches as I wish to be able to go from one
            spinnaker to the other while under way.

            There is a dearth of pad eyes forward for spinnaker work.

            The original 1-inch track for the jib sheet is not in a good position
            and not long enough for oversize headsails.

            I am putting on Aluminum toe-rail to help with the above issues.

            They back just fine to port; you need to learn how to do it. Get
            some way on the boat; shift into neutral and then the boat will
            follow the rudder with no problem.

            Sure she is small below. She is a narrow beam and low freeboard
            design.

            Jericho is a bitch to sail. She either flies or is a dog when she
            gets a little out of trim. Not a forgiving boat if you want to sail
            lazy.

            Jerry


          • Dane Keehn
            Yankee Gang, I m glad for JS report (below). I own hull 105, have owned her for the last 5 years and can report that I essentially have no problems. I
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 15, 2008
              Yankee Gang,
              I'm glad for JS' report (below).  I own hull 105, have owned her for the last 5 years  and can report that I essentially have no problems.  I wasn't going to take the time to itemize everything but I can say that everything that JS says about his Mk1 is true for my Mk111 hull too.  She's sound throughout.  If I have a complaint, it is merely that it is hard to race this older boat against the newer, lighter, faster craft out there.  Hey, but I knew that before I bought her so I am generally happy with this boat. 
               
              Dane 

              >>> "jsdozy" <jsdozy@...> 10/14/2008 11:17 PM >>>

              I have owned hull #46 (1971 MkI) since 1994. It exhibits none of the problems that are attributed to Jericho. The hull-to-deck joint is secure and dry. It is through-bolted every six inches. The toe rail is screw-fastened. The transom is robust and sound. The fore and aft chainplates are robust and secure. The genoa track is ten feet long. I have a 135. It should accept at least a 150 qnd possibly a 165. The rudder stock and keelbolts are silicon bronze, not stainless and as such are not susceptible to crevice corrosion. To the best of my knowledge there have been no documented failures of either rudder stock or keel bolts. My boat was severely dicked with by several moron previous owners before I got her, but I must say that she weathered her mistreatment with characteristic aplomb. About two years ago I rebedded all deck hardware from stancions to genoa track and found virtually no evidence of moist balsa deck core even though the original bedding was thirty-five years old. I did have one problem with deck core aft of the cockpit coaming due to failed bedding of the aluminum trim strip covering the hull-to-deck joint. Several owners have had problems with the cabin top flexing as halyards are tensioned through turning blocks or deck organizers near the mast. The bulkheads on Hull #46 are screw-fastened to the hull in that area and do not exhibit that problem. Most of my lines lead aft to the cabin top on either side of the companionway. They do not interfere with the dodger. The sheet winch bases are robust and the coamings do not flex under load. The side decks are narrow but it is not necessary to climb up onto the cabin top to get around the shrouds. My gelcoat was was crazed but not cracked from stress. I sanded through the crazing prior to painting and found no issues. The hull is virtually blister-free except for a few gelcoat blisters below the waterline about the diameter of a pencil eraser and half as deep as the gelcoat.  I have no problems with excessive weather helm. She trims easily and will sail herself for minutes at a time if properly balanced. The engine location is in my opinion unsurpassed for access. The engine cover and bilge cover lift away and provide easy access from flywheel to stern tube. The engine compartment is tight as a result - the cover fits like the proverbial glove - and it is a bit noisy below with the engine running. The interior is a bit cramped - it's not a modern layout, but the narrow beam contributes to stiffness, as does the 47% ballast/displacemen t ratio. The V-berth will easily accept anyone under 6'4". My opinion is that the Yankee has at least the storage and possibly more than other thirty footers of the same vintage - Pearson, Cal, etc. The early 70's Tartan 30 is a close relative and you might want to take a look at one of those to get a feel for the interior of the Yankee. Also remember that the Yankee was roughly twice the price of a similar vintage Pearson or equivalent. The icebox is large but poorly insulated.  One thing I find handy is the settee seat back flips up. The original design intent was to provide a sort of bunk bed arrangement for the settee, but I use the seat back as a workbench. A six foot long foot-and-a-half wide workbench is something that owners of many 50 foot boats would kill for, no? Frankly, I was a bit surprised to hear about Jericho's issues until I considered that she was the last hull built. It would seem likely that employees were aware of the imminent demise of Yankee Yachts well before the fact and in retrospect it might not be outside the realm of possibility to expect that the last hull would be slap-dashed together. (Or even the last five or ten hulls for that matter) If I had to do it all over again I would buy a MK 1 before a ll or a lll. I personally didn't care for the philosophy of adding a little mast height here, a little more ballast there, and otherwise trying to fix a design that was't broke but that's just my opinion. I very well might be wrong about that but I do know and can say without reservation that Mkl Hull #46 is a stout well built and designed boat that I would take offshore with complete confidence.
               
              JS
               
               
               
               
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2008 8:54 PM
              Subject: Re: [yankee30] Re: To get a Yankee 30?

              Jerry,
              I'm sorry that your Yankee is such a problem.  I owned Independence, Hull # 1, laid down in 1971.  She has none of the problems you describe.  Somewhere along the line, someone converted her to wheel steering.  She sails great in all kinds of weather.  I really enjoyed sailing her while I had her.
              Mike Mitchell

              On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 9:40 PM, Jerry Thompson <um_saudade@yahoo. com> wrote:

              Hi Chris,

              I am the owner of Jericho hull # 132, the last Yankee thirty
              built. I hope I didn't get the best boat built because if I did I
              pity the rest!

              I have owned Jericho for a little over a year now and have sailed her
              a lot and spent nearly 800 hours on a re-fit. While I am not ready
              to give a detailed report as of yet I would be glad to e-mail it to
              you or it will be available here when I post.

              Over all a good boat with some major issues. I don't think the glass
              is all that good as the gelcoat is very brittle and cracking (not
              crazing) from the flex in the hull.

              The fore and backstay chainplates and the glass they go into are weak
              The transom is very weak unless reinforced. I would be scared of
              taking a breaking wave over the stern.

              The deck to hull joint is a joke. On Jericho, most of the joint was
              broken loose. It was glued down on the gelcoated hull and that
              doesn't work. Most of the screws missed, and the whole thing flexed
              like crazy.

              The transom to deck joint was not even caulked and was trimmed over
              by a piece of teak.

              The cockpit coaming is not heavy enough to take the winches.

              The halyard winches need to be on the dog house roof for blue water
              sailing.

              Still needs more winches as I wish to be able to go from one
              spinnaker to the other while under way.

              There is a dearth of pad eyes forward for spinnaker work.

              The original 1-inch track for the jib sheet is not in a good position
              and not long enough for oversize headsails.

              I am putting on Aluminum toe-rail to help with the above issues.

              They back just fine to port; you need to learn how to do it. Get
              some way on the boat; shift into neutral and then the boat will
              follow the rudder with no problem.

              Sure she is small below. She is a narrow beam and low freeboard
              design.

              Jericho is a bitch to sail. She either flies or is a dog when she
              gets a little out of trim. Not a forgiving boat if you want to sail
              lazy.

              Jerry


            • Greg Lyons
              G day, I love my boat, it is an S&S 30 which is a re-badged yankee 30, although she is a bit different to many of the yankee 30 s spoken about here. She is
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 17, 2008
                G'day, I love my boat, it is an S&S 30 which is a re-badged yankee 30, although she is a bit different to many of the yankee 30's spoken about here.
                She is different in these respects:-
                She is built from the yankee 30 moulds that came from the USA to a boatbuilder in Western Australia who re-badged them S&S30's. The moulds then went to Sydney, and then to Cairns in Queensland Australia where 5 hulls were produced. My hull was completed 6 years ago, and the fitout 5 years ago! Hull and deck are identical in every respect so far as I can see to all the yankee's I have viewed 
                She sails like a dream, and the openess of the layout below and the fitout make her feel much bigger than 30'.
                We are  a family of four and when cruising or passage racing, her cockpit and her below decks is not at all cramped. We have, believe it or not, entertained with 12 people sitting comfortably around the saloon table! The layout as I have said is a very open one.
                 
                Here are some pictures of "Evening Star". She now lives in Geelong, Victoria, Australia. At the Royal Geelong Yacht Club, the home of Scandia Geelong Race week (the sister event to Scandia Cowes Race Week).
                 
                regards,
                 
                Greg Lyons  

                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Chris Campbell <yahoo@...>
                To: yankee30@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, 12 October, 2008 7:21:34 AM
                Subject: [yankee30] To get a Yankee 30?

                Hi group,

                I'm just about to sell my current boat, and am looking around for the
                next one - part of my coping mechanism for letting this one go,
                actually. I don't want to be boatless for long!

                I have long admired the Yankee 30, in fact I looked at Mae McGrath on
                the same boat hunting trip that netted me my current boat. I did like
                the Yankee, but I liked the LeComte Northeast 38 I bought better at
                the time - now I've realized that I'd rather not pay for that big a
                boat, so I'm selling to downsize, and I'm back to looking at Yankee
                30's, among other boats.

                I'm hoping I can impose on you for some honest opinions - naturally
                difficult for a group of people who obviously love their boats, but
                you folks know them better than anyone, so who better to ask?

                The Yankee 30's are all getting pretty old now (although there are the
                Heritage Boat Works boats that are about 10 years younger) - are any
                of you noticing problems due to aging? I don't mean crazing gelcoat or
                fittings wearing or rigging needing replacement, but structural
                issues. Are the boats softening over time, and starting to flex? Are
                the hull/deck joints beginning to fail, and requiring significant
                maintenance? Are the keel bolts in need of replacement? Are any of
                them showing signs of delamination in the hull? I'm sure there are
                delaminating decks - impossible to avoid with cored construction, but
                I'm not as worried about that, fixing them is a pain, but not that
                difficult. Hulls are another story, though. I know that Yankee had
                some of the best construction techniques in the business, so I expect
                that problems are few - but I'd like to know if anyone's had any
                difficulties yet.

                When I looked at the Mae McGrath I was surprised with how tight the
                cabin felt - especially given that she didn't have that large a
                cockpit. I guess the narrow beam and even narrower ends doesn't leave
                much room for accommodation. I think I can live with that, but would
                love to hear how people feel about them. Do you cruise (2-3 week
                summer cruise type of thing) and do you find you've got ample space
                for what you bring along? I ask since we find that we load our 38
                footer down pretty heavily for two of us for our annual cruise, so I'm
                curious about how people feel about the Yankee. How does she feel on
                deck under way? Is going forward in a blow to reef the main
                comfortable? Are the side decks large enough to move on? Are the
                shrouds in the way of getting forward so you need to jump onto the
                cabin top and back down once past them? Again, I've being spoiled by
                very large side decks and a heavy boat's motion.

                Everything I read about the way they sail excites me - the thought of
                enjoying going to weather in a blow is really amazing! How about their
                helm? If I get a tiller steered one will the weather helm sometimes
                tire my arm out? I find the Northeast 38 develops weather helm if I
                don't reef soon enough when going to weather and when broad reaching -
                how does the Yankee 30 do under those conditions? Does she sail well
                under autopilot? Weathervane? How wet are they to sail in 25 knots?
                How hard is it to fit a dodger with the mainsheet where it is?

                How are they for single handing with a wheel or with a tiller? My
                Northeast has the main and jibsheets coming right to the wheel, so I
                don't need to move or stretch to sail on my own. The jib's roller
                furling is lead right to the helmsman also. Are the Yankee 30's set up
                conveniently for singlehanding also?

                I understand that backing to port is impossible - that's too bad, but
                no showstopper, with a full keel and attached rudder, I'm used to
                essentially having no control in reverse under power anyway. Being
                able to turn to starboard under power will open up all kinds of new
                possibilities for me! Is having the engine in the middle of the saloon
                a drag for any reason, or is the accessibility of it and the centering
                of the weight in the boat great, with no downsides? How about noise
                down below under power? From the cockpit? I guess boats with Atomic
                IVs are likely quieter, with diesels noisier. Is there room for sound
                insulation without major modification?

                I could probably go on all day asking questions, but this has already
                become a lot to read, and a lot to ask of a group of people. Hopefully
                some of you will have time to respond - I truly appreciate any input
                you can provide me with.

                I'm also about to be in the market, on the East coast, if anyone knows
                of a boat for sale or that I can look at to learn more about what
                they're like.

                Thanks!

                Chris


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              • Christopher Cassidy
                Thanks Greg, I have never seen such a well finished S & S 30. I have one of the boats built at Swarbricks(Western Australia) in 1978 but it looks nothing like
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 17, 2008
                  Thanks Greg,
                  I have never seen such a well finished S & S 30. I have one of the
                  boats built at Swarbricks(Western Australia) in 1978 but it looks
                  nothing like yours inside at the moment, a work in progress and a
                  long way to go to refurbish her. Mine is "Dampiera" and sits at
                  South of Perth Yacht Club however is a little neglected at the moment.

                  She is still a very sound boat with none of the problems encountered
                  by Chris. I fitted a new Yanmar 3YM20 diesel motor which has been a
                  great success however still much to be done in respect to an engine
                  box and new flooring.

                  Regards

                  Chris Cassidy


                  --- In yankee30@yahoogroups.com, Greg Lyons <boatsafevictoria@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > G'day, I love my boat, it is an S&S 30 which is a re-badged yankee
                  30, although she is a bit different to many of the yankee 30's spoken
                  about here.
                  > She is different in these respects:-
                  > She is built from the yankee 30 moulds that came from the USA to a
                  boatbuilder in Western Australia who re-badged them S&S30's. The
                  moulds then went to Sydney, and then to Cairns in Queensland
                  Australia where 5 hulls were produced. My hull was completed 6 years
                  ago, and the fitout 5 years ago! Hull and deck are identical in every
                  respect so far as I can see to all the yankee's I have viewed 
                  > She sails like a dream, and the openess of the layout below and the
                  fitout make her feel much bigger than 30'.
                  > We are  a family of four and when cruising or passage racing, her
                  cockpit and her below decks is not at all cramped. We have, believe
                  it or not, entertained with 12 people sitting comfortably around the
                  saloon table! The layout as I have said is a very open one.
                  >
                  > Here are some pictures of "Evening Star". She now lives in Geelong,
                  Victoria, Australia. At the Royal Geelong Yacht Club, the home of
                  Scandia Geelong Race week (the sister event to Scandia Cowes Race
                  Week).
                  >
                  > regards,
                  >
                  > Greg Lyons  
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message ----
                  > From: Chris Campbell <yahoo@...>
                  > To: yankee30@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Sunday, 12 October, 2008 7:21:34 AM
                  > Subject: [yankee30] To get a Yankee 30?
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi group,
                  >
                  > I'm just about to sell my current boat, and am looking around for
                  the
                  > next one - part of my coping mechanism for letting this one go,
                  > actually. I don't want to be boatless for long!
                  >
                  > I have long admired the Yankee 30, in fact I looked at Mae McGrath
                  on
                  > the same boat hunting trip that netted me my current boat.. I did
                  like
                  > the Yankee, but I liked the LeComte Northeast 38 I bought better at
                  > the time - now I've realized that I'd rather not pay for that big a
                  > boat, so I'm selling to downsize, and I'm back to looking at Yankee
                  > 30's, among other boats.
                  >
                  > I'm hoping I can impose on you for some honest opinions - naturally
                  > difficult for a group of people who obviously love their boats, but
                  > you folks know them better than anyone, so who better to ask?
                  >
                  > The Yankee 30's are all getting pretty old now (although there are
                  the
                  > Heritage Boat Works boats that are about 10 years younger) - are any
                  > of you noticing problems due to aging? I don't mean crazing gelcoat
                  or
                  > fittings wearing or rigging needing replacement, but structural
                  > issues. Are the boats softening over time, and starting to flex? Are
                  > the hull/deck joints beginning to fail, and requiring significant
                  > maintenance? Are the keel bolts in need of replacement? Are any of
                  > them showing signs of delamination in the hull? I'm sure there are
                  > delaminating decks - impossible to avoid with cored construction,
                  but
                  > I'm not as worried about that, fixing them is a pain, but not that
                  > difficult. Hulls are another story, though. I know that Yankee had
                  > some of the best construction techniques in the business, so I
                  expect
                  > that problems are few - but I'd like to know if anyone's had any
                  > difficulties yet.
                  >
                  > When I looked at the Mae McGrath I was surprised with how tight the
                  > cabin felt - especially given that she didn't have that large a
                  > cockpit. I guess the narrow beam and even narrower ends doesn't
                  leave
                  > much room for accommodation. I think I can live with that, but would
                  > love to hear how people feel about them. Do you cruise (2-3 week
                  > summer cruise type of thing) and do you find you've got ample space
                  > for what you bring along? I ask since we find that we load our 38
                  > footer down pretty heavily for two of us for our annual cruise, so
                  I'm
                  > curious about how people feel about the Yankee. How does she feel on
                  > deck under way? Is going forward in a blow to reef the main
                  > comfortable? Are the side decks large enough to move on? Are the
                  > shrouds in the way of getting forward so you need to jump onto the
                  > cabin top and back down once past them? Again, I've being spoiled by
                  > very large side decks and a heavy boat's motion.
                  >
                  > Everything I read about the way they sail excites me - the thought
                  of
                  > enjoying going to weather in a blow is really amazing! How about
                  their
                  > helm? If I get a tiller steered one will the weather helm sometimes
                  > tire my arm out? I find the Northeast 38 develops weather helm if I
                  > don't reef soon enough when going to weather and when broad
                  reaching -
                  > how does the Yankee 30 do under those conditions? Does she sail well
                  > under autopilot? Weathervane? How wet are they to sail in 25 knots?
                  > How hard is it to fit a dodger with the mainsheet where it is?
                  >
                  > How are they for single handing with a wheel or with a tiller? My
                  > Northeast has the main and jibsheets coming right to the wheel, so I
                  > don't need to move or stretch to sail on my own. The jib's roller
                  > furling is lead right to the helmsman also. Are the Yankee 30's set
                  up
                  > conveniently for singlehanding also?
                  >
                  > I understand that backing to port is impossible - that's too bad,
                  but
                  > no showstopper, with a full keel and attached rudder, I'm used to
                  > essentially having no control in reverse under power anyway. Being
                  > able to turn to starboard under power will open up all kinds of new
                  > possibilities for me! Is having the engine in the middle of the
                  saloon
                  > a drag for any reason, or is the accessibility of it and the
                  centering
                  > of the weight in the boat great, with no downsides? How about noise
                  > down below under power? From the cockpit? I guess boats with Atomic
                  > IVs are likely quieter, with diesels noisier. Is there room for
                  sound
                  > insulation without major modification?
                  >
                  > I could probably go on all day asking questions, but this has
                  already
                  > become a lot to read, and a lot to ask of a group of people..
                  Hopefully
                  > some of you will have time to respond - I truly appreciate any input
                  > you can provide me with.
                  >
                  > I'm also about to be in the market, on the East coast, if anyone
                  knows
                  > of a boat for sale or that I can look at to learn more about what
                  > they're like.
                  >
                  > Thanks!
                  >
                  > Chris
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Send instant messages to your online friends
                  http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
                  >
                • wdemeter
                  Your Yankee sounds nothing like my Yankee! It appears they thew your boat together to get it out of the shop and turn out the lights. Too bad. ... her ...
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 19, 2008
                    Your Yankee sounds nothing like my Yankee! It appears they thew your
                    boat together to get it out of the shop and turn out the lights. Too
                    bad.
                    --- In yankee30@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Thompson" <um_saudade@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Chris,
                    >
                    > I am the owner of Jericho hull # 132, the last Yankee thirty
                    > built. I hope I didn't get the best boat built because if I did I
                    > pity the rest!
                    >
                    > I have owned Jericho for a little over a year now and have sailed
                    her
                    > a lot and spent nearly 800 hours on a re-fit. While I am not ready
                    > to give a detailed report as of yet I would be glad to e-mail it to
                    > you or it will be available here when I post.
                    >
                    > Over all a good boat with some major issues. I don't think the
                    glass
                    > is all that good as the gelcoat is very brittle and cracking (not
                    > crazing) from the flex in the hull.
                    >
                    > The fore and backstay chainplates and the glass they go into are
                    weak
                    > The transom is very weak unless reinforced. I would be scared of
                    > taking a breaking wave over the stern.
                    >
                    > The deck to hull joint is a joke. On Jericho, most of the joint
                    was
                    > broken loose. It was glued down on the gelcoated hull and that
                    > doesn't work. Most of the screws missed, and the whole thing
                    flexed
                    > like crazy.
                    >
                    > The transom to deck joint was not even caulked and was trimmed over
                    > by a piece of teak.
                    >
                    > The cockpit coaming is not heavy enough to take the winches.
                    >
                    > The halyard winches need to be on the dog house roof for blue water
                    > sailing.
                    >
                    > Still needs more winches as I wish to be able to go from one
                    > spinnaker to the other while under way.
                    >
                    > There is a dearth of pad eyes forward for spinnaker work.
                    >
                    > The original 1-inch track for the jib sheet is not in a good
                    position
                    > and not long enough for oversize headsails.
                    >
                    > I am putting on Aluminum toe-rail to help with the above issues.
                    >
                    > They back just fine to port; you need to learn how to do it. Get
                    > some way on the boat; shift into neutral and then the boat will
                    > follow the rudder with no problem.
                    >
                    > Sure she is small below. She is a narrow beam and low freeboard
                    > design.
                    >
                    > Jericho is a bitch to sail. She either flies or is a dog when she
                    > gets a little out of trim. Not a forgiving boat if you want to
                    sail
                    > lazy.
                    >
                    > Jerry
                    >
                  • Chris Campbell
                    Hi again, Thank you all so much for sharing your knowledge and experiences with your Yankee 30 s. What a wealth of information! I m sorry to hear that not all
                    Message 9 of 10 , Oct 20, 2008
                      Hi again,

                      Thank you all so much for sharing your knowledge and experiences with
                      your Yankee 30's. What a wealth of information! I'm sorry to hear that
                      not all of the experiences have been positive - especially for your
                      sake, Jerry - but glad for my sake that most of them have been.

                      It certainly seems like for a couple who aren't over 6' tall, live in
                      a place with rugged weather (we're in Halifax, NS), enjoy sailing
                      quickly, don't want the maintenance of a wooden boat but do want a
                      boat that is a pleasure to look at, the Yankee 30 is a great
                      compromise (given that all boats are compromises).

                      Now comes the challenge of finding ones to look at, and hopefully one
                      to buy. I've been contacted by a couple of people with boats for sale
                      - but they're both more than 2000 miles away from me, making dropping
                      by to check them out a bit of a challenge! If anyone has a boat that's
                      closer that we can look at - either to just see it or to consider
                      purchasing - please get in touch. Our timeframe is before spring
                      launch, and our price range is less than the expensive ones on
                      Yachtworld (Truant and Summer Snow).

                      Thanks again!

                      Chris
                    • Chris Campbell
                      Greg, Do you have more pictures of the interior of your boat? And are you designing and building that yourself, or is that one of the options for the S&S 30
                      Message 10 of 10 , Nov 7 10:36 AM
                        Greg,

                        Do you have more pictures of the interior of your boat? And are you
                        designing and building that yourself, or is that one of the options
                        for the S&S 30 interior? Where is the mast? Deck stepped, above the
                        table support? Where is the head? What's the galley layout like? Can
                        adults sleep in the forepeak, or is that strictly for kids? Where else
                        can you sleep on the boat?

                        I'm now looking at a Yankee that is pretty torn apart, so it might be
                        worth thinking about a complete redesign of the cabin layout. Or I
                        might be nuts, and should stick with it the way it is! Any information
                        and pictures would be greatly appreciated, nonetheless...

                        Thanks,

                        Chris

                        --- In yankee30@yahoogroups.com, Greg Lyons <boatsafevictoria@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > G'day, I love my boat, it is an S&S 30 which is a re-badged yankee
                        30, although she is a bit different to many of the yankee 30's spoken
                        about here.
                        > She is different in these respects:-
                        > She is built from the yankee 30 moulds that came from the USA to a
                        boatbuilder in Western Australia who re-badged them S&S30's. The
                        moulds then went to Sydney, and then to Cairns in Queensland
                        Australia where 5 hulls were produced. My hull was completed 6 years
                        ago, and the fitout 5 years ago! Hull and deck are identical in every
                        respect so far as I can see to all the yankee's I have viewed 
                        > She sails like a dream, and the openess of the layout below and the
                        fitout make her feel much bigger than 30'.
                        > We are  a family of four and when cruising or passage racing, her
                        cockpit and her below decks is not at all cramped. We have, believe
                        it or not, entertained with 12 people sitting comfortably around the
                        saloon table! The layout as I have said is a very open one.
                        >
                        > Here are some pictures of "Evening Star". She now lives in Geelong,
                        Victoria, Australia. At the Royal Geelong Yacht Club, the home of
                        Scandia Geelong Race week (the sister event to Scandia Cowes Race Week).
                        >
                        > regards,
                        >
                        > Greg Lyons  
                        >
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