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mast rake

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  • Stephen
    I noticed that with either a 135% or 120% genoa I am still 5 to 10 degrees off the upwind course of beamier boats. I believe that a Yankee 30 should point
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 7 10:20 PM
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      I noticed that with either a 135% or 120% genoa I am still 5 to 10
      degrees off the upwind course of beamier boats. I believe that a
      Yankee 30 should point better that I am. After trying various sheeting
      intensity and angles, increasing backstay pressure I don't see a great
      deal of change.

      So, before I spring for a new kevlar jib I thought I would experiment
      with mast rake. I don't have inordinate lee helm, or weather helm for
      that matter.

      Any suggestions or ideas?
    • Dane Keehn
      Stephen, did you get any answers? dane ... I noticed that with either a 135% or 120% genoa I am still 5 to 10 degrees off the upwind course of beamier boats. I
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 14 11:47 AM
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        Stephen,
        did you get any answers?
         
        dane

        >>> "Stephen" <sspoja@...> 7/7/2008 10:20 PM >>>

        I noticed that with either a 135% or 120% genoa I am still 5 to 10
        degrees off the upwind course of beamier boats. I believe that a
        Yankee 30 should point better that I am. After trying various sheeting
        intensity and angles, increasing backstay pressure I don't see a great
        deal of change.

        So, before I spring for a new kevlar jib I thought I would experiment
        with mast rake. I don't have inordinate lee helm, or weather helm for
        that matter.

        Any suggestions or ideas?

      • Jerry Thompson
        Stephen, A couple of questions: Have you sailed on both tacks in relatively steady wind to determine if the boat will sail on nearly the same angle on either
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 15 1:11 PM
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          Stephen,

          A couple of questions: Have you sailed on both tacks in relatively
          steady wind to determine if the boat will sail on nearly the same
          angle on either tack when close hauled? Most boats will not have
          enough symmetry in either hull or rigging to sail equally well on
          both tacks. But---it should be close.

          If your two tacks vary in pointing ability by more than 3 or 4
          degrees, speed drops off on one or the other tack or you have more
          weather helm on one tack, I would look to balancing the shroud
          tension before doing anything else.

          The second question that comes to mind is headsail size and design.
          If you can't sheet the headsail tightly enough you can't get the boat
          to point high. The more oversize the headsail the tougher it is to
          get it sheeted tightly enough when close hauled.

          The third question is what are the wind and sea conditions when you
          don't think it points high enough? It probably has different
          pointing abilities in heavy or moderate winds as opposed to light
          airs. The sails set up to give good drive in light air or heavy
          swell will not point high.

          Does the boat reach a point where she shudders and looses drive or is
          it more a case of speed dropping off?

          My Jericho likes a starboard tack a little bit better than a port
          tack. I can't tell any difference in the mast angle or feel much
          difference in the shrouds but she can. I also get a little more
          weather helm on the starboard tack. I am not too worried as I will
          be re-rigging next year and will fine tune then.

          I have now put on over a thousand miles in the last year trying to
          find the weak links in Jericho. She is very fast if sail trim is
          perfect. Let anything get a little out of tune and she sails like a
          dog. I have often awakened in the middle of a watch by the
          sluggishness and I go on deck and help the helmsman to trim the sails
          until she leaps ahead again.

          Jerry



          --- In yankee30@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen" <sspoja@...> wrote:
          >
          > I noticed that with either a 135% or 120% genoa I am still 5 to 10
          > degrees off the upwind course of beamier boats. I believe that a
          > Yankee 30 should point better that I am. After trying various
          sheeting
          > intensity and angles, increasing backstay pressure I don't see a
          great
          > deal of change.
          >
          > So, before I spring for a new kevlar jib I thought I would
          experiment
          > with mast rake. I don't have inordinate lee helm, or weather helm
          for
          > that matter.
          >
          > Any suggestions or ideas?
          >
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