Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Comparison

Expand Messages
  • tsuidc
    Is there a difference in build-quality between the Santa Ana Yankee Yacht Y30 and the Oregon Heritage Boat works Y30?
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 13, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Is there a difference in build-quality between the Santa Ana Yankee
      Yacht Y30 and the Oregon Heritage Boat works Y30?
    • jsdozy
      To the best of my knowledge ( and much of that is anecdotal) Heritage Boat Works bought the hull, deck and keel molds for the MkIII from Yankee Yachts about
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 13, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
           To the best of my knowledge ( and much of that is anecdotal) Heritage Boat Works bought the hull, deck and keel molds for the MkIII from Yankee Yachts about 1975 or 76. As Yankee had commissioned the design, S&S's standard was to supervise each hull to insure that the build was to their spec. (When S&S heard that Catalina had bought the hull mold for the Yankee 38, they almost had a large farm animal and made sure that an S&S rep was at the Catalina factory for each 38 build - they had a reputation to protect. ). According to Yankee's sales literature, their shop was temperature and humidity controlled - somewhat of a rarity in the early 70's - although in the low humidity and relatively benign temperature of SoCal it was somewhat overkill. But I'm sure in retrospect we're all glad they had that shop because the incidence of hull blisters is virtually nonexistent.
         
        Heritage built not only the Y30 (to order) but also built several Jay Benford designs (four molds of which were purchased by Cascade Yachts when Heritage went out of business) and several small commercial and recreational fishing boat designs of around 30 ft+/-. Heritage was in business from 1976 to 1984. 
         
        Unless someone on the list has first hand info about Heritage Boat Works' facilities, one can only speculate on their temperature and humidity control. As an aside, about 15 years ago I was in a boat yard in Port Townsend while a vendor was peeling the hull of a Cape Dory 30 (an east coast-built boat). As the gelcoat peeled away and blisters popped a bright blue-colored watery liquid leaked out and streamed down the hull. We all stood around scratching our heads until the yard's fiberglass guy commented that they must have done the layup on a cold damp day because they obviously added cobalt to the resin to get it to kick. Obviously, a temperature and humidity-controlled environment would certainly be an asset in the Pacific Northwest.
         
        Did S&S supervise construction? Hard to say. They might have documentation. There's also no evidence that Heritage bought or used the molds for the hull liner. The liner, as designed by S&S was an integral element of the structure. Did Heritage use silicon bronze for rudderstock and keelbolts or did they substitute somewhat inferior stainless steel? Was the hull layup done to the original schedule? Hard to say. Last spring I was in Hood River for a weekend and walked some docks. I saw what appeared to be a  Heritage Yankee. From dockside there were some things about it that looked materially different than an original, but at this point I really couldn't say what they were.
         
        Personally, given a choice, I'd pick an original over the second generation, unless it was one of the S&S 30's (same design #1999) by Swarbrick who is still in business. But then you'd have to go to Australia. Additionally, I have no information whatsoever on the Y30's built on Vashon Island, WA. They may have been second generation MkI's or II's. I just don't know. I did see a photo of a Vashon Y30 with a pilothouse (gag). Olin would roll over in his grave.
         
        Just my opinion. Hope this helps.
         
        JS
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: tsuidc
        Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2007 4:49 PM
        Subject: [yankee30] Comparison

        Is there a difference in build-quality between the Santa Ana Yankee
        Yacht Y30 and the Oregon Heritage Boat works Y30?

      • Owen McCall
        Olin would roll over in his grave. Reminds me of a couple of lines from a Randy Newman song: If Marx were alive today He d be rolling around in his grave
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 14, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          "Olin would roll over in his grave."

          Reminds me of a couple of lines from a Randy Newman song:

          If Marx were alive today
          He'd be rolling around in his grave

          Olin is even more likely to roll, since he is still with us!
          In fact, he will turn 100 on April 13.

          Second, JS, you have solved a puzzle for me. When I was removing all
          the old bottom paint from my S&S30 (quite similar to a Yankee 30) I
          found only one small blemish, about the size of a dime. It was an
          intense cobalt blue, and when I poked it with an awl a very thin, very
          blue liquid ran out. The (nonAustralian) S&S30s were built in
          Rackheath, England, a very cold and damp place. So what you say makes
          perfect sense.

          Owen McCall

          On Dec 13, 2007 11:26 PM, jsdozy <jsdozy@...> wrote:
          > To the best of my knowledge ( and much of that is anecdotal) Heritage
          > Boat Works bought the hull, deck and keel molds for the MkIII from Yankee
          > Yachts about 1975 or 76. As Yankee had commissioned the design, S&S's
          > standard was to supervise each hull to insure that the build was to their
          > spec. (When S&S heard that Catalina had bought the hull mold for the Yankee
          > 38, they almost had a large farm animal and made sure that an S&S rep was at
          > the Catalina factory for each 38 build - they had a reputation to protect.
          > ). According to Yankee's sales literature, their shop was temperature and
          > humidity controlled - somewhat of a rarity in the early 70's - although in
          > the low humidity and relatively benign temperature of SoCal it was somewhat
          > overkill. But I'm sure in retrospect we're all glad they had that shop
          > because the incidence of hull blisters is virtually nonexistent.
          >
          > Heritage built not only the Y30 (to order) but also built several Jay
          > Benford designs (four molds of which were purchased by Cascade Yachts when
          > Heritage went out of business) and several small commercial and recreational
          > fishing boat designs of around 30 ft+/-. Heritage was in business from 1976
          > to 1984.
          >
          > Unless someone on the list has first hand info about Heritage Boat Works'
          > facilities, one can only speculate on their temperature and humidity
          > control. As an aside, about 15 years ago I was in a boat yard in Port
          > Townsend while a vendor was peeling the hull of a Cape Dory 30 (an east
          > coast-built boat). As the gelcoat peeled away and blisters popped a bright
          > blue-colored watery liquid leaked out and streamed down the hull. We all
          > stood around scratching our heads until the yard's fiberglass guy commented
          > that they must have done the layup on a cold damp day because they obviously
          > added cobalt to the resin to get it to kick. Obviously, a temperature and
          > humidity-controlled environment would certainly be an asset in the Pacific
          > Northwest.
          >
          > Did S&S supervise construction? Hard to say. They might have documentation.
          > There's also no evidence that Heritage bought or used the molds for the hull
          > liner. The liner, as designed by S&S was an integral element of the
          > structure. Did Heritage use silicon bronze for rudderstock and keelbolts or
          > did they substitute somewhat inferior stainless steel? Was the hull layup
          > done to the original schedule? Hard to say. Last spring I was in Hood River
          > for a weekend and walked some docks. I saw what appeared to be a Heritage
          > Yankee. From dockside there were some things about it that looked materially
          > different than an original, but at this point I really couldn't say what
          > they were.
          >
          > Personally, given a choice, I'd pick an original over the second generation,
          > unless it was one of the S&S 30's (same design #1999) by Swarbrick who is
          > still in business. But then you'd have to go to Australia. Additionally, I
          > have no information whatsoever on the Y30's built on Vashon Island, WA. They
          > may have been second generation MkI's or II's. I just don't know. I did see
          > a photo of a Vashon Y30 with a pilothouse (gag). Olin would roll over in his
          > grave.
          >
          > Just my opinion. Hope this helps.
          >
          > JS
        • tsuidc
          JS you have provided a very enlightening comparison and helpful reply. Thanks DT ... Heritage Boat Works bought the hull, deck and keel molds for the MkIII
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 14, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            JS you have provided a very enlightening comparison and helpful reply.
            Thanks
            DT



            --- In yankee30@yahoogroups.com, "jsdozy" <jsdozy@...> wrote:
            >
            > To the best of my knowledge ( and much of that is anecdotal)
            Heritage Boat Works bought the hull, deck and keel molds for the
            MkIII from Yankee Yachts about 1975 or 76. As Yankee had commissioned
            the design, S&S's standard was to supervise each hull to insure that
            the build was to their spec. (When S&S heard that Catalina had bought
            the hull mold for the Yankee 38, they almost had a large farm animal
            and made sure that an S&S rep was at the Catalina factory for each 38
            build - they had a reputation to protect. ). According to Yankee's
            sales literature, their shop was temperature and humidity controlled -
            somewhat of a rarity in the early 70's - although in the low
            humidity and relatively benign temperature of SoCal it was somewhat
            overkill. But I'm sure in retrospect we're all glad they had that
            shop because the incidence of hull blisters is virtually nonexistent.
            >
            > Heritage built not only the Y30 (to order) but also built several
            Jay Benford designs (four molds of which were purchased by Cascade
            Yachts when Heritage went out of business) and several small
            commercial and recreational fishing boat designs of around 30 ft+/-.
            Heritage was in business from 1976 to 1984.
            >
            > Unless someone on the list has first hand info about Heritage Boat
            Works' facilities, one can only speculate on their temperature and
            humidity control. As an aside, about 15 years ago I was in a boat
            yard in Port Townsend while a vendor was peeling the hull of a Cape
            Dory 30 (an east coast-built boat). As the gelcoat peeled away and
            blisters popped a bright blue-colored watery liquid leaked out and
            streamed down the hull. We all stood around scratching our heads
            until the yard's fiberglass guy commented that they must have done
            the layup on a cold damp day because they obviously added cobalt to
            the resin to get it to kick. Obviously, a temperature and humidity-
            controlled environment would certainly be an asset in the Pacific
            Northwest.
            >
            > Did S&S supervise construction? Hard to say. They might have
            documentation. There's also no evidence that Heritage bought or used
            the molds for the hull liner. The liner, as designed by S&S was an
            integral element of the structure. Did Heritage use silicon bronze
            for rudderstock and keelbolts or did they substitute somewhat
            inferior stainless steel? Was the hull layup done to the original
            schedule? Hard to say. Last spring I was in Hood River for a weekend
            and walked some docks. I saw what appeared to be a Heritage Yankee.
            From dockside there were some things about it that looked materially
            different than an original, but at this point I really couldn't say
            what they were.
            >
            > Personally, given a choice, I'd pick an original over the second
            generation, unless it was one of the S&S 30's (same design #1999) by
            Swarbrick who is still in business. But then you'd have to go to
            Australia. Additionally, I have no information whatsoever on the
            Y30's built on Vashon Island, WA. They may have been second
            generation MkI's or II's. I just don't know. I did see a photo of a
            Vashon Y30 with a pilothouse (gag). Olin would roll over in his grave.
            >
            > Just my opinion. Hope this helps.
            >
            > JS
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: tsuidc
            > To: yankee30@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2007 4:49 PM
            > Subject: [yankee30] Comparison
            >
            >
            > Is there a difference in build-quality between the Santa Ana
            Yankee
            > Yacht Y30 and the Oregon Heritage Boat works Y30?
            >
          • Trent Hightower
            I m the owner of Felicity, (http://storm.prohosting.com/yankee30/felicity.shtml) the Heritage built Yankee 30 birthed in Hood River. This is the boat that
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 14, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              I'm the owner of "Felicity,"  (http://storm.prohosting.com/yankee30/felicity.shtml)  the Heritage built Yankee 30 birthed in Hood River.  This is the boat that JS mentions below.  I haven't had the opportunity to get up close and personal with many "Yankee Yachts" built Y30s so I'm not able to provide  a comprehensive construction comparison but I can tell  you that  the hull/deck construction on "Felicity" is STOUT.  Very stout.  There are some configuration differences that I'm aware of though.  Felicity has ten opening portlights instead of just four.  She has double lowers as well.  Because of that the interior knee/chinplate assemplies are different than the original factory built boats.  She also has a diesel under the cockpit instead of the A4 in the main cabin. 

              The Y30 website has some scans of the Heritage construction literature here http://storm.prohosting.com/yankee30/heritage.htm.  I actually have the original hard copy of this filed away on Felicity.

              Felicity was commissioned and finished by an old salt in 1981.  Much of the configuration is custom and was designed for serious offshore use.  The original owner logged over 3000 miles offshore here in the Pacific Northwest.  Having owned and sailed this boat for six years I can attest that she is happiest when sailed HARD.  I continue to be impressed beyond my expectations with this boat.

              Hal Seagraves, the owner of Heritage is still kickin' around town here in the Hood but seems to be unavailable for comments.  I have tried several times :)

              I would absolutely buy another Heritage boat if I had the opportunity.

              Trent




              ----- Original Message ----
              From: tsuidc <tsuidc@...>
              To: yankee30@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, December 14, 2007 8:15:26 AM
              Subject: [yankee30] Re: Comparison

              JS you have provided a very enlightening comparison and helpful reply.
              Thanks
              DT

              --- In yankee30@yahoogroup s.com, "jsdozy" <jsdozy@...> wrote:
              >
              > To the best of my knowledge ( and much of that is anecdotal)
              Heritage Boat Works bought the hull, deck and keel molds for the
              MkIII from Yankee Yachts about 1975 or 76. As Yankee had commissioned
              the design, S&S's standard was to supervise each hull to insure that
              the build was to their spec. (When S&S heard that Catalina had bought
              the hull mold for the Yankee 38, they almost had a large farm animal
              and made sure that an S&S rep was at the Catalina factory for each 38
              build - they had a reputation to protect. ). According to Yankee's
              sales literature, their shop was temperature and humidity controlled -
              somewhat of a rarity in the early 70's - although in the low
              humidity and relatively benign temperature of SoCal it was somewhat
              overkill. But I'm sure in retrospect we're all glad they had that
              shop because the incidence of hull blisters is virtually nonexistent.
              >
              > Heritage built not only the Y30 (to order) but also built several
              Jay Benford designs (four molds of which were purchased by Cascade
              Yachts when Heritage went out of business) and several small
              commercial and recreational fishing boat designs of around 30 ft+/-.
              Heritage was in business from 1976 to 1984.
              >
              > Unless someone on the list has first hand info about Heritage Boat
              Works' facilities, one can only speculate on their temperature and
              humidity control. As an aside, about 15 years ago I was in a boat
              yard in Port Townsend while a vendor was peeling the hull of a Cape
              Dory 30 (an east coast-built boat). As the gelcoat peeled away and
              blisters popped a bright blue-colored watery liquid leaked out and
              streamed down the hull. We all stood around scratching our heads
              until the yard's fiberglass guy commented that they must have done
              the layup on a cold damp day because they obviously added cobalt to
              the resin to get it to kick. Obviously, a temperature and humidity-
              controlled environment would certainly be an asset in the Pacific
              Northwest.
              >
              > Did S&S supervise construction? Hard to say. They might have
              documentation. There's also no evidence that Heritage bought or used
              the molds for the hull liner. The liner, as designed by S&S was an
              integral element of the structure. Did Heritage use silicon bronze
              for rudderstock and keelbolts or did they substitute somewhat
              inferior stainless steel? Was the hull layup done to the original
              schedule? Hard to say. Last spring I was in Hood River for a weekend
              and walked some docks. I saw what appeared to be a Heritage Yankee.
              From dockside there were some things about it that looked materially
              different than an original, but at this point I really couldn't say
              what they were.
              >
              > Personally, given a choice, I'd pick an original over the second
              generation, unless it was one of the S&S 30's (same design #1999) by
              Swarbrick who is still in business. But then you'd have to go to
              Australia. Additionally, I have no information whatsoever on the
              Y30's built on Vashon Island, WA. They may have been second
              generation MkI's or II's. I just don't know. I did see a photo of a
              Vashon Y30 with a pilothouse (gag). Olin would roll over in his grave.
              >
              > Just my opinion. Hope this helps.
              >
              > JS
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: tsuidc
              > To: yankee30@yahoogroup s.com
              > Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2007 4:49 PM
              > Subject: [yankee30] Comparison
              >
              >
              > Is there a difference in build-quality between the Santa Ana
              Yankee
              > Yacht Y30 and the Oregon Heritage Boat works Y30?
              >




              Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
            • jsdozy
              Jeez! Sorry, Olin! My bad. Here s hoping that viewing that pilothouse disgracing that Yankee doesn t contribute to your untimely demise! JS ... From: Owen
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 14, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Jeez! Sorry, Olin! My bad. Here's hoping that viewing that pilothouse disgracing that Yankee doesn't contribute to your untimely demise!
                 
                JS
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Friday, December 14, 2007 7:26 AM
                Subject: Re: [yankee30] Comparison

                "Olin would roll over in his grave."

                Reminds me of a couple of lines from a Randy Newman song:

                If Marx were alive today
                He'd be rolling around in his grave

                Olin is even more likely to roll, since he is still with us!
                In fact, he will turn 100 on April 13.

                Second, JS, you have solved a puzzle for me. When I was removing all
                the old bottom paint from my S&S30 (quite similar to a Yankee 30) I
                found only one small blemish, about the size of a dime. It was an
                intense cobalt blue, and when I poked it with an awl a very thin, very
                blue liquid ran out. The (nonAustralian) S&S30s were built in
                Rackheath, England, a very cold and damp place. So what you say makes
                perfect sense.

                Owen McCall

                On Dec 13, 2007 11:26 PM, jsdozy <jsdozy@comcast. net> wrote:
                > To the best of my knowledge ( and much of that is anecdotal) Heritage
                > Boat Works bought the hull, deck and keel molds for the MkIII from Yankee
                > Yachts about 1975 or 76. As Yankee had commissioned the design, S&S's
                > standard was to supervise each hull to insure that the build was to their
                > spec. (When S&S heard that Catalina had bought the hull mold for the Yankee
                > 38, they almost had a large farm animal and made sure that an S&S rep was at
                > the Catalina factory for each 38 build - they had a reputation to protect.
                > ). According to Yankee's sales literature, their shop was temperature and
                > humidity controlled - somewhat of a rarity in the early 70's - although in
                > the low humidity and relatively benign temperature of SoCal it was somewhat
                > overkill. But I'm sure in retrospect we're all glad they had that shop
                > because the incidence of hull blisters is virtually nonexistent.
                >
                > Heritage built not only the Y30 (to order) but also built several Jay
                > Benford designs (four molds of which were purchased by Cascade Yachts when
                > Heritage went out of business) and several small commercial and recreational
                > fishing boat designs of around 30 ft+/-. Heritage was in business from 1976
                > to 1984.
                >
                > Unless someone on the list has first hand info about Heritage Boat Works'
                > facilities, one can only speculate on their temperature and humidity
                > control. As an aside, about 15 years ago I was in a boat yard in Port
                > Townsend while a vendor was peeling the hull of a Cape Dory 30 (an east
                > coast-built boat). As the gelcoat peeled away and blisters popped a bright
                > blue-colored watery liquid leaked out and streamed down the hull. We all
                > stood around scratching our heads until the yard's fiberglass guy commented
                > that they must have done the layup on a cold damp day because they obviously
                > added cobalt to the resin to get it to kick. Obviously, a temperature and
                > humidity-controlled environment would certainly be an asset in the Pacific
                > Northwest.
                >
                > Did S&S supervise construction? Hard to say. They might have documentation.
                > There's also no evidence that Heritage bought or used the molds for the hull
                > liner. The liner, as designed by S&S was an integral element of the
                > structure. Did Heritage use silicon bronze for rudderstock and keelbolts or
                > did they substitute somewhat inferior stainless steel? Was the hull layup
                > done to the original schedule? Hard to say. Last spring I was in Hood River
                > for a weekend and walked some docks. I saw what appeared to be a Heritage
                > Yankee. From dockside there were some things about it that looked materially
                > different than an original, but at this point I really couldn't say what
                > they were.
                >
                > Personally, given a choice, I'd pick an original over the second generation,
                > unless it was one of the S&S 30's (same design #1999) by Swarbrick who is
                > still in business. But then you'd have to go to Australia. Additionally, I
                > have no information whatsoever on the Y30's built on Vashon Island, WA. They
                > may have been second generation MkI's or II's. I just don't know. I did see
                > a photo of a Vashon Y30 with a pilothouse (gag). Olin would roll over in his
                > grave.
                >
                > Just my opinion. Hope this helps.
                >
                > JS

              • richardbrunt@uniserve.com
                I surveyed a Heritage Y30 a few years back. It seemed quite well constructed with no glaring short cuts taken anywhere that I could see. Keel bolts were
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 14, 2007
                • 0 Attachment

                  I surveyed a Heritage Y30 a few years back.  It seemed quite well constructed with no glaring short cuts taken anywhere that I could see.  Keel bolts were bronze.  The rig was stout.  This boat had the engine under the dinette, like the earlier Y 30s. Finishing on this boat was a bit crude (perhaps owner finished?) The owner reported no blisters, (but who knows). Headroom was an honest 5’10” – not 6’ as advertised.

                   

                  Regards,

                   

                  Richard Brunt

                   

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: yankee30@yahoogroups.com [mailto:yankee30@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jsdozy
                  Sent: Friday, December 14, 2007 9:17 AM
                  To: yankee30@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [yankee30] Comparison

                   

                  Jeez! Sorry, Olin! My bad. Here's hoping that viewing that pilothouse disgracing that Yankee doesn't contribute to your untimely demise!

                   

                  JS

                   

                   

                   

                   

                   

                  ----- Original Message -----

                  Sent: Friday, December 14, 2007 7:26 AM

                  Subject: Re: [yankee30] Comparison

                   

                  "Olin would roll over in his grave."

                  Reminds me of a couple of lines from a Randy Newman song:

                  If Marx were alive today
                  He'd be rolling around in his grave

                  Olin is even more likely to roll, since he is still with us!
                  In fact, he will turn 100 on April 13.

                  Second, JS, you have solved a puzzle for me. When I was removing all
                  the old bottom paint from my S&S30 (quite similar to a Yankee 30) I
                  found only one small blemish, about the size of a dime. It was an
                  intense cobalt blue, and when I poked it with an awl a very thin, very
                  blue liquid ran out. The (nonAustralian) S&S30s were built in
                  Rackheath, England, a very cold and damp place. So what you say makes
                  perfect sense.

                  Owen McCall

                  On Dec 13, 2007 11:26 PM, jsdozy <jsdozy@comcast. net> wrote:
                  > To the best of my knowledge ( and much of that is anecdotal) Heritage
                  > Boat Works bought the hull, deck and keel molds for the MkIII from Yankee
                  > Yachts about 1975 or 76. As Yankee had commissioned the design, S&S's
                  > standard was to supervise each hull to insure that the build was to their
                  > spec. (When S&S heard that Catalina had bought the hull mold for the Yankee
                  > 38, they almost had a large farm animal and made sure that an S&S rep was at
                  > the Catalina factory for each 38 build - they had a reputation to protect.
                  > ). According to Yankee's sales literature, their shop was temperature and
                  > humidity controlled - somewhat of a rarity in the early 70's - although in
                  > the low humidity and relatively benign temperature of SoCal it was somewhat
                  > overkill. But I'm sure in retrospect we're all glad they had that shop
                  > because the incidence of hull blisters is virtually nonexistent.
                  >
                  > Heritage built not only the Y30 (to order) but also built several Jay
                  > Benford designs (four molds of which were purchased by Cascade Yachts when
                  > Heritage went out of business) and several small commercial and recreational
                  > fishing boat designs of around 30 ft+/-. Heritage was in business from 1976
                  > to 1984.
                  >
                  > Unless someone on the list has first hand info about Heritage Boat Works'
                  > facilities, one can only speculate on their temperature and humidity
                  > control. As an aside, about 15 years ago I was in a boat yard in Port
                  > Townsend while a vendor was peeling the hull of a Cape Dory 30 (an east
                  > coast-built boat). As the gelcoat peeled away and blisters popped a bright
                  > blue-colored watery liquid leaked out and streamed down the hull. We all
                  > stood around scratching our heads until the yard's fiberglass guy commented
                  > that they must have done the layup on a cold damp day because they obviously
                  > added cobalt to the resin to get it to kick. Obviously, a temperature and
                  > humidity-controlled environment would certainly be an asset in the Pacific
                  > Northwest.
                  >
                  > Did S&S supervise construction? Hard to say. They might have documentation.
                  > There's also no evidence that Heritage bought or used the molds for the hull
                  > liner. The liner, as designed by S&S was an integral element of the
                  > structure. Did Heritage use silicon bronze for rudderstock and keelbolts or
                  > did they substitute somewhat inferior stainless steel? Was the hull layup
                  > done to the original schedule? Hard to say. Last spring I was in Hood River
                  > for a weekend and walked some docks. I saw what appeared to be a Heritage
                  > Yankee. From dockside there were some things about it that looked materially
                  > different than an original, but at this point I really couldn't say what
                  > they were.
                  >
                  > Personally, given a choice, I'd pick an original over the second generation,
                  > unless it was one of the S&S 30's (same design #1999) by Swarbrick who is
                  > still in business. But then you'd have to go to Australia. Additionally, I
                  > have no information whatsoever on the Y30's built on Vashon Island, WA. They
                  > may have been second generation MkI's or II's. I just don't know. I did see
                  > a photo of a Vashon Y30 with a pilothouse (gag). Olin would roll over in his
                  > grave.
                  >
                  > Just my opinion. Hope this helps.
                  >
                  > JS

                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.