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anchoring

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  • Stephen
    Has anyone had problems with the Yankee not swinging downwind at anchor (the way you would expect)? The last two times anchoring on SF Bay, in 10-15 ft of
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 12, 2007
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      Has anyone had problems with the Yankee not swinging downwind at
      anchor (the way you would expect)? The last two times anchoring on SF
      Bay, in 10-15 ft of water with ample scope, the boat spun around and
      pointed downwind. Net result is the anchor line fouled on the keel,
      and I have wind on the port beam and current from the starboard beam.

      I am trying to determine if this is due to current or if the boats
      simply won't weathervane.

      One solution that came to mind is to increase the length of anchor
      chain from 10 feet to 30 feet so as to not have a flat angle on the
      rode. if boat does spin in current at least I won't foul on the keel.

      Any thoughts?
    • Jack Mackinnon
      Stephen, You did not say where you were anchored, nor the state of the current. There are many SF Bay anchorages that are untenable due to strong currents.
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 12, 2007
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        Stephen,

        You did not say where you were anchored, nor the state of the current.
        There are many SF Bay anchorages that are untenable due to strong
        currents. Just remember, the SF Bay ebbs may exceed 5 knots, plus as
        much as 3 knots of river run off (not this year).

        In winds of 15 knots or less the boat will lie to the current, rather
        than the wind. If you want confirmation of this, look at the tankships
        lying in anchorage 9 (between Hunter's point and Alameda). With strong
        afternoon westerlies, they will more often be lying with bow North or
        South due to the currents, rather than with bow west, into the wind.

        To help ride with the wind, you can make a small riding sail about 8
        feet on the luff and 4 feet luff perpendicular. Hoist it hanked to the
        backstay so the clew is 5 feet or so off the transom and sheet it flat
        to the coach roof. This will hold the stern downwind if there is more
        than 5 knots wind, unless the current is very strong.

        Jack Mackinnon, AMSĀ®-SMS
        (Senior Marine Surveyor)
        PO Box 335
        San Lorenzo, CA 94580
        510-276-4351
        510-909-6956 cell
        510-276-9237 fax


        On Aug 12, 2007, at 12:40 PM, Stephen wrote:

        > Has anyone had problems with the Yankee not swinging downwind at
        > anchor (the way you would expect)? The last two times anchoring on SF
        > Bay, in 10-15 ft of water with ample scope, the boat spun around and
        > pointed downwind. Net result is the anchor line fouled on the keel,
        > and I have wind on the port beam and current from the starboard beam.
        >
        > I am trying to determine if this is due to current or if the boats
        > simply won't weathervane.
        >
        > One solution that came to mind is to increase the length of anchor
        > chain from 10 feet to 30 feet so as to not have a flat angle on the
        > rode. if boat does spin in current at least I won't foul on the keel.
        >
        > Any thoughts?
        >
        >
      • Steve Botts
        What Jack is describing is exactly my experience. Where I ve been anchored for a day or more, in areas with current, the boat swings with the current.
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 12, 2007
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          What Jack is describing is exactly my experience.  Where I've been anchored for a day or more, in areas with current, the boat swings with the current.  Sometimes you've got the situation you described with the wind and the current battling to move the boat.  I'ive never tried an anchor riding sail, but it sounds like a something worth a try. 


          From: yankee30@yahoogroups.com [mailto:yankee30@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jack Mackinnon
          Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2007 1:03 PM
          To: yankee30@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [yankee30] anchoring

          Stephen,

          You did not say where you were anchored, nor the state of the current. There are many SF Bay anchorages that are untenable due to strong currents. Just remember, the SF Bay ebbs may exceed 5 knots, plus as much as 3 knots of river run off (not this year).

          In winds of 15 knots or less the boat will lie to the current, rather than the wind. If you want confirmation of this, look at the tankships lying in anchorage 9 (between Hunter's point and Alameda). With strong afternoon westerlies, they will more often be lying with bow North or South due to the currents, rather than with bow west, into the wind.

          To help ride with the wind, you can make a small riding sail about 8 feet on the luff and 4 feet luff perpendicular. Hoist it hanked to the backstay so the clew is 5 feet or so off the transom and sheet it flat to the coach roof. This will hold the stern downwind if there is more than 5 knots wind, unless the current is very strong.

          Jack Mackinnon, AMS®-SMS
          (Senior Marine Surveyor)
          PO Box 335
          San Lorenzo, CA 94580
          510-276-4351
          510-909-6956 cell
          510-276-9237 fax



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