Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[y2k-resource-center] Y2K Propaganda Beginning To Unravel

Expand Messages
  • Dan Steele
    ... Y2K Resource Center Newsletter, Vol. 82: 12/01/99 ... Y2K Propaganda Beginning To Unravel by Dan Steele, EE http://www.egroups.com/list/y2k-resource-center
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 1999
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Y2K Resource Center Newsletter, Vol. 82: 12/01/99
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Y2K Propaganda Beginning To Unravel

      by Dan Steele, EE
      http://www.egroups.com/list/y2k-resource-center
      http://www.suttondesigns.com/NetsaversCenter/index3.html

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Contents:

      1) Y2K Propaganda Beginning To Unravel
      2) Engineers On Internet Y2K Breakdowns
      3) Pentagon Lists Things That Can Go Wrong
      4) Industry and Government Not Y2K Compliant
      5) Small Businesses and Y2K
      6) U.S. Army Authority Over 77 Texas Counties?
      7) Y2K Wake-up Call

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Send this Newsletter to a friend!

      They need only send a BLANK letter to the LINK BELOW to
      SUBSCRIBE to the Netsavers Software Newsletter.

      y2k-resource-center-subscribe@egroups.com

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      1) Y2K Propaganda Beginning To Unravel
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Dan Steele, EE

      All is not good on the Y2K front. The peaceful reports we have been
      given by the government and the news media, are beginning to fall
      apart. Just like the rioting at WTO, confusion and danger could
      result.

      All is not good on the Internet front. The system is vulnerable to
      disruptions. So reports the committee of engineers in the first
      article that follows.

      The Y2K taskforce organized by the Internet Association of Japan
      has developed a comprehensive analysis and simulation of technical
      problems that could occur on the Internet due to Y2K, according to
      a Newsbytes story published Nov. 30 in Computer Currents.

      The taskforce authors emphasize that the nature of the Internet -
      as a collection of mutually connected networks - means that
      problems in other areas of the Net may influence other networks, no
      matter how well prepared each provider may be.

      The case studies looked at individual Net-connected servers, the
      routing of traffic between computer servers on the global Internet
      and the DNS and how servers behave in conjunction with the
      directing and transferring of e-mail and other Internet traffic.

      All is not good on the Pentegon front. This also translates
      directly to problems you can expect to affect your own PC, too.
      In our second article, the Pentagon Lists Things That Can Go Wrong
      with their PCs, and by extension, to your PCs as well. This is a
      very brief list, but, it is amazing that the Pentagon presents it
      after all the claims at being "on top of everything Y2K".

      Guess what? The U.S. Industry and U.S. Government are NOT Y2K
      Compliant. Does this come as a surprise to you? Then read our third
      article.

      "Because so many small businesses won't be prepared for the new
      millennium, the demand for Y2K fixes likely will exceed the supply
      in January."

      -John Koskinen, chairman of the President's Council on Year 2000
      Conversion

      Wow. This is pretty blunt, coming from Koskinen, who has been
      running the propaganda machine on "rosy Y2K scenerios".

      These articles and more are brought to you in the hopes that you
      can help "spread the word" to people, so that THEY can evaluate the
      situation themselves. It could help prevent problems later.

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      2) Engineers On Internet Y2K Breakdowns
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Adam Creed, Newsbytes

      A Y2K taskforce organized by the Internet Association of Japan has
      developed a comprehensive analysis and simulation of technical
      problems that could occur on the Internet due to Y2K.

      The findings of the report have been published on the Internet and
      are available for Internet service providers and network engineers,
      along with countermeasures to any possible problems.

      The authors emphasize that the nature of the Internet - as a
      collection of mutually connected networks - means that problems in
      other areas of the Net may influence other networks, no matter how
      well prepared each provider may be.

      The case studies looked at individual Net-connected servers, the
      routing of traffic between computer servers on the global Internet
      and the DNS and how servers behave in conjunction with the
      directing and transferring of e-mail and other Internet traffic.

      Problems were identified in servers that use and rely on Internet
      protocols like HTTP and FTP as well as computers that require
      access to worldwide DNSs.

      Under certain scenarios e-mail and news group articles could be
      discarded, e-mail could build up on a mail server and be delayed
      and IP addresses may not be found. Also older operating systems on
      routers may have Y2K problems and certain sites may become
      congested.

      Recommendations include:

      1) ensuring server software is upgraded to the latest version
      2) be aware and plan for abnormal traffic loads over New Year
      3 adjusting clock sources and DNS settings.

      On a global scale, the taskforce called for more international
      cooperation on Y2K contingency matters for the Internet
      infrastructure.

      They particularly called for an investigation of all major DNS
      servers and the running of simulations to see under what
      circumstances mail and other servers could fail.

      The IAJ taskforce's report is available on the Web, at
      http://www.iaj.or.jp/y2ktf/r01e.html.

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      3) Pentagon Lists Things That Can Go Wrong
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Joint Staff, Y2K Task Force

      Here is the Pentagon's list of Y2K problem areas. This is from
      Joint Staff, Year 2000, Operational Evaluation Guide, prepared by
      the Joint Staff, Y2K Task Force, The Pentagon, Room 1D825,
      Washington, DC 20002.

      * * * * * * * * * * * *

      SYMPTOMS LIST OF COMMON Y2K FAILURES

      * System date upon powering up is 1980 or some year in the distant
      past

      * Date display (displayed at the "date" command) is different than
      expected

      * Unexpected expiration of passwords, licenses, security cards,
      etc.

      * Operating system file operations give unexpected results, e.g.,
      files that are really young are treated as if they are old (the
      operating system asks if you wish to overwrite a "old file" that
      you know to be a "new" file)

      * Software development tools/systems (compilers) that overwrite
      "old" versions do not perform as expected, e.g., changes made to
      compiled programs suddenly disappear and problems that have been
      fixed suddenly reappear after recompilation of modules

      * Auto-archive or delete functions on files or email are launched
      immediately after a year 2000 date is encountered

      * Incorrect calculations involving time spans or timing intervals

      * Applications that depend on file sorting by date for correct
      operation suddenly fail or present illogical results

      * Inability to "talk" to applications that are external to the
      local network

      * Reduced throughput due to operations at lower rate communication
      links as a result of loss of master timing distributed by satellite
      systems

      * Ability to maintain voice switches numbering plan lost, e.g.,
      cannot add or remove users. This impact will increase with time if
      not corrected

      * Loss of ability to pass traffic in record traffic systems due to
      anti-orbital provisions

      * Cryptographic operations will be degraded to transmission in the
      clear; followed by key initialization and distribution problems
      resulting from expired key

      * Intel analysis could be impacted if time ordered images are
      utilized

      * Loss of weapon systems targeting capability due to loss of radar
      operations

      * Routers encounter cyclic redundancy check failures

      Link: http://209.207.236.112/2000/y2k/docs/y2kopeva.html#appc

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      4) Industry and Government Not Y2K Compliant
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Computerworld

      Only 13.5% of small and midsize chemical and petroleum firms have
      completed Y2K preparations.

      The Food and Drug Administration said 4,053 high-risk biomedical
      devices remain noncompliant. More than half of all health care
      providers won't be ready. And 70% of schools are unprepared.

      The PR departments will have a lot of explaining to do in January.
      The public will have a rude awakening.

      In September, Cap Gemini America, an information technology
      consulting firm in New York, found that 44% of major companies
      wouldn't have their mission-critical systems compliant by January,
      according to a Nov. 28 article in ComputerWorld.

      A CIO magazine poll found that 81% of large companies weren't yet
      finished and that half the companies surveyed had no contingency
      plans.

      A National Federation of Independent Business study found that 40%
      of small businesses had done nothing about Y2K.

      Where progress has been made, work completed to date remains in
      question, ComputerWorld said.

      According to independent validation and verification (IV&V) studies
      by SEEC Inc. in Pittsburgh, the average mainframe or midrange
      system contains 510 date-related errors after remediation.

      A second study in February by Reasoning Inc. in Mountain View,
      Calif., found between 100 and 1,000 bugs in similar samplings.

      An unrelated study by SriSoft Corp. in Diamond Bar, Calif., in
      October discovered that testing catches 30% of Y2K bugs, while IV&V
      uncovers another 40% to 45%. This leaves 25% of the remaining bugs
      in a best-case scenario.

      Statistics drawn from government hearings and Web sites paint a
      more detailed picture. Only 13.5% of small and midsize chemical and
      petroleum firms have completed Y2K preparations.

      The Food and Drug Administration said 4,053 high-risk biomedical
      devices remain noncompliant. More than half of all health care
      providers won't be ready. And 70% of schools are unprepared.

      ComputerWorld said even best-case scenarios are imperfect. The
      Social Security Administration (SSA) began year 2000 efforts in
      1989.

      In July, according to the Information Systems Accounting &
      Information Management Division, SSA found 1,565 year 2000 errors
      in mission-critical systems. Only 44% of these had been fixed as of
      October. SSA is still checking data and finalizing contingency
      plans.

      Why is the government telling us that most industries are 100% Y2K-
      compliant when bug-free systems are a myth?

      The answer is that the government and selected industries don't
      want people to panic. But when things go wrong, people will demand
      answers.

      The unrealistic Y2K performance expectations set by industry
      associations are unachievable.

      Link: http://www.computerworld.com/home/print.nsf/all/991129CE6A

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      5) Small Businesses and Y2K
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Houston Business Journal

      Most surveys show that 28% of small U.S. businesses are planning to
      fix on failure. The estimates run from 14 million to 24 million
      small businesses in the U.S. 28% of 24 million is 500,000.

      There's enough time to get all businesses fixed, Koskinen says.

      Up to 500,000 small businesses have decided to wait until Jan. 1 to
      see if they have any Year 2000 computer problems, figuring they can
      address any glitches after they occur, says the White House's Y2K
      czar.

      This story appeared in the Houston Business Journal on Nov. 29.
      This "fixing on failure" strategy enables these businesses to avoid
      the cost of Y2K identification and testing programs.

      But it's risky, says John Koskinen, chairman of the President's
      Council on Year 2000 Conversion.

      * * * * * * * * * *

      "Because so many small businesses won't be prepared for the new
      millennium, the demand for Y2K fixes likely will exceed the supply
      in January."

      * * * * * * * * * *

      Small businesses with computers or other devices that malfunction
      when they read the last two digits of 2000 as 1900 may have to wait
      weeks or even months to get the services or products needed to fix
      the problems, Koskinen says.

      Even though there are only a few weeks left in 1999, there is still
      time for small businesses to squash the Y2K bug before it bites,
      the Houston newspaper reported.

      * * * * * * * * * *

      "But clearly we're getting close to the edge," Koskinen says.

      * * * * * * * * * *

      The good news is American businesses and governments as a whole are
      "well-prepared," says Commerce Secretary William M. Daley. "And the
      economy should be able to shrug off the relatively minor
      disruptions that inevitably will happen."

      Link:
      http://www.amcity.com/houston/stories/1999/11/29/newscolumn1.html

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      6) U.S. Army Authority Over 77 Texas Counties?
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      The Internet allows us to discover bits and pieces that would not
      normally get to the general public. The click-through links at the
      bottom of the site's page on martial law allows verification. The
      link to the video also adds credibility.

      Americans who understand why the U.S. Constitution places civilian
      authorities over the U.S. Army except under emergency conditions
      will understand the threat that martial law offers. There is no
      national emergency yet.

      George W. Bush has not declared a state of emergency. He has not
      mobilized the National Guard. As this article reminds us,The US
      Army has no authority over the civilians. On the contrary, the
      United States Constitution places the Army under civilian control.

      Additionally, the Posse Commitatus Act (18USC1385) prohibits
      military personnel from executing local, state, or federal laws
      except as the Constitution or act of Congress authorizes.

      So, what is going on here?

      While everyone has been wondering what excuse the Federal
      Government will use to declare Martial Law, we have been living
      under it.

      For years, right here in Texas, US Army soldiers have been
      performing civilian law enforcement duties off base, according to a
      story published by InfoWars.

      According to a U.S. Army SWAT Entry Team Leader with the 38th MP
      unit at Fort Hood, the City of Killeen has been using the Fort Hood
      SWAT Team to serve warrants and arrest civilians for at least the
      past two years.

      Apparently, Killeen does not have a SWAT Team of its own, so the
      city uses US Army soldiers instead. The Army, for its part, seems
      only too happy to oblige.

      All of this came to light when Mike Hanson, cameraman for
      documentary film maker Alex Jones, spotted a bus being searched on
      a blocked-off stretch of the feeder road along I-35 in the middle
      of Temple.

      Mike was on his way to Waco with a load of building materials for
      the new Mount Carmel Chapel. With his camera ever at the ready,
      Mike got off at the next exit and swung back around to film the
      incident. Other local media were already at the scene of
      what appeared to be an ordinary police search.

      The subject of the search was a Greyhound bus that was stopped at 5
      a.m. on its way from Dallas to San Antonio in response to a bomb
      threat. Lt. Best, the Temple police officer responsible for the
      media, immediately approached Mike and informed him that this was a
      military operation being conducted by the EOD group from Ft. Hood.

      Lt. Best requested that Mike not film the faces of the soldiers
      performing the search, but film them from the back only. Mike
      said that we did not have secret military police in this country,
      and wanted an explanation as to why these soldiers could not be
      filmed.

      According to InfoWars, Lt. Best responded, "They do stuff like this
      and they just don't want the people to know what they've done."

      Link: http://www.infowars.com/martiallaw.html

      ------------------------------------------------------------

      7) Y2K Wake-up Call
      ------------------------------------------------------------

      Dan Steele, EE

      Most Americans are pretty well numbed by Y2k news. The whole Y2k
      thing seems unreal -- at least, less real than the goings on in the
      virtual world.

      Many can accept the soundness of internet companies with no sales,
      negative profit, yet millions of dollars in capitalization. But a
      software screw-up because of Y2k? Nah. Can't happen to me.

      I've got news for you. Layer upon layer, the cumulative affect of
      Y2k problems *will* affect you. Electrical problems and sporadic
      brownouts will occur, gradually increasing after January 1.

      There *will* be internet sites with problems. Shopping carts, and
      other CGI-BIN processes will fail at some sites because the perl
      scripts weren't checked. Some hosting firms have inadequate
      electrical backup... sites can't stay up running on air.

      What was that? Your site/factory/home has backup generators? Good
      luck running your computer equipment on them. The electrical noise
      will cause computer system degradation, at least, or in some cases,
      destruction of solid-state devices.

      The largest Y2k problems will be cumulative. Line by line the non-
      compliant code will begin to take its toll on data that is used to
      make decisions, earn a living, protect lives.

      Just like the traffic light that goes haywire at the worst time,
      there will be singular events that will affect you personally. When
      is the last time that you had to do a major re-installation of
      application software? Application failures usually occur at the
      worst times, too, when you had several files open.

      Time to get going. With the holidays FAST approaching, do you
      REALLY want to deal with this later??

      Netsavers Y2K TSR Scanner Kit: $18
      (for the RTC clock in your computer)

      http://216.156.23.77/NetsaversCenter/index3.html

      Netsavers NET2000 Total Software Scanner: $59.95
      (for the RTC clock, operating system, and applications)


      ------------------------------------------------------------

      To Unsubscribe: send a BLANK letter to:
      y2k-resource-center-unsubscribe@egroups.com
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.