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Commercial motorcycles shut-down in Lagos

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  • Eric Britton
    Like I keep saying, massive numbers of motorcycles and mopeds is a symptom of neglect of public transport. If the rich can drive, are the masses really going
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 7, 2006
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       “Like I keep saying, massive numbers of motorcycles and mopeds is a symptom of neglect of public transport. If the rich can drive, are the masses really going to do without mobility if they can afford it? How could you persuade them otherwise? Eric Bruun”

       

      Och Laddie, there’s the beastie.

       

      Dear Eric Bruun and all of us who are following this thread.

       

      Not to be disrespectful Eric, and I know you are well aware of this, but please give me a moment more on this to see if I can make a positive contribution here to what after all is an extremely important matter – in the knowledge that if we here are not able to develop a common vocabulary and broadly shared vision of the solution set, then the old mobility guys are going to continue to rule the day.

       

      Our choice of words is ever dangerous, since it can in a single sweep narrow the field of thought and choice,  and in the process leave out of sight what just may be our best solutions.  Thus when we see that time-blessed word “mass” (just after its good and often partner “rich”) and then that other one “public transport” we suddenly are swept into a mental architecture, a far too narrow room,  which in my view simply does not help us in the world in which we live.

       

      Here it is dear friends, suddenly a first clumsy step into the 21st century -- and with the fury of economic and technological development the patterns of travel have exploded in time and space we find ourselves living in a world which is very different from the old days. And the old vocabulary. The same old vocabulary that looked so good and so prescient back when Uncle Karl was sitting there in the warmth of the Reading Room of the British Library scratching out the vocabulary that dominated thinking and policy in many places for the century ahead.  But hey! it’s 2006 and when we look out on the streets we simply do not see all that many long lines of workers, lunch pails in hand and docilely waiting to get to the factory or mine gates by opening time. Some yes, but there’s a lot more to it than that.

       

      Let’s sep back and remind ourselves what is actually going on out there on our streets. (And yes of course I know all you know this, but it just may serve as a quick reminder, because clearly there are an awful lot of very handsome people making policy decisions in the sector who apparently do not fully understand the problematique.)

       

      So I went over to out little Global South video library this morning (http://www.youtube.com/group/globalsouth) and picked out a handful of one minute clips showing street action in cities in India, China, Bangladesh and Vietnam – in an attempt to see if I might get the general idea across in a few vivid minutes. I then popped in a little introduction and labeled the whole thing with the following immortal prose:

       

      "Mass Transport" in the Global South. You tell me. Where are these people going? And when do they want to go there? Will traditional public transport do the job for all of them? Certainly no, and in many cases not only on the grounds of the origin, destination and timing of travel, but also on cost grounds.  Should this be taken to mean that there is no room for fixed route scheduled services in our cities in 2006?  Of course there is, but the demand patterns have changed and so must the supply.  Probably the biggest conundrum for planners and policy makers, above all in the cities of the Global South.

       

      You can catch it at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jcy2rBxesY&feature=PlayList&p=0ABE0A9AB3E4C5FA&index=0&playnext=1

       

      And by the way if you look at the last clip showing Ho Chi Minh street in Saigon, you will in addition to hundreds of motorized two and three wheelers a bus.  Slow down the image and count the number of people you see on the bus. I guess that’s what we mean by “mass”.  ;-)

       

      Eric Britton

       

      PS. If you do check out the videos, would you might sending me a very short note informing me that you did. And were they useful? Thanks.

       

    • Daryl Oster
      Mopeds, motorcycles, and car proliferation are the symptom of the inferior transportation value of trains and busses. Proof is the 40X greater government
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 17, 2006
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        Mopeds, motorcycles, and car proliferation are the symptom of the inferior
        transportation value of trains and busses. Proof is the 40X greater
        government subsidy (on a passenger-kilometer basis) that is now needed to
        sustain train and bus production. Passenger trains are no longer capable of
        operating at a profit as they where able to do when they represented the
        best alternative to muscle transport. Trains and busses in developing
        nations are now being displaced by cars and aircraft as they have been in
        developed nations.

        Automation and efficiency improvements have produced value revolutions in
        production and communication that allow most to be able to wear shoes and
        socks, communicate across hundreds of miles, watch happenings from around
        the world in near real time for a small fraction of the cost of just a
        generation or two ago. A benefit of communication automation is awareness
        of and desire for improving ones living condition to better standards
        enjoyed in more developed societies.

        It is undeniable that adoption of mopeds and cars is causing problems as
        people climb the learning curve of abiding by rules that is necessitated by
        the use of powered road vehicles, AND planning for and funding (by use fees
        and taxes) the required infrastructure expansions.

        Car and moped adoption also causes problems for the powerful train
        producers, who have a increasingly difficult time garnishing public funds
        for passenger rail projects that consistently fail to meet expectations, and
        continue to be overrun in the market by the higher transportation value of
        jets, cars, and mopeds.


        By supplying greater value transportation than jets, cars, and motorcycles,
        their use will fade, just as the greater value of jets, cars and motorcycles
        is causing the use of trains and busses to fade. ETT and other automated
        transportation technology advances are capable of producing much greater
        transportation value for most people than jets, cars, and mopeds, AND at the
        same time avoid the biggest problems of muscle power transport, trains,
        cars, motorcycles, and jets.

        Using draconian measures like banning cars, mopeds, and motorcycles in order
        to prop up the lower transportation value of trains and busses is only
        likely to increase social unrest made evident by communication automation
        value advances. Instead of propping up moribund transportation tech; many
        of the problems of cars and mopeds (and a score of additional problems --
        like running out of cheap petroleum) can be avoided by adopting new advances
        in transportation value improvement like ETT and automated PRT




        Daryl Oster
        (c) 2006  all rights reserved.  ETT, et3, MoPod, "space travel on earth"
        e-tube, e-tubes, and the logos thereof are trademarks and or service marks
        of et3.com Inc.  For licensing information contact: POB 1423, Crystal River
        FL 34423-1423  (352)257-1310, et3@... , www.et3.com


        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: xTransit@yahoogroups.com [mailto:xTransit@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        > Of Eric Britton
        > Sent: Thursday, September 07, 2006 6:44 AM
        > To: LotsLessCars@yahoogroups.com; xTransit@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [xTransit] Commercial motorcycles shut-down in Lagos
        >
        > “Like I keep saying, massive numbers of motorcycles and mopeds is a
        > symptom of neglect of public transport. If the rich can drive, are the
        > masses really going to do without mobility if they can afford it? How
        > could you persuade them otherwise? Eric Bruun”
        >
        >
        >
        > Och Laddie, there’s the beastie.
        >
        >
        >
        > Dear Eric Bruun and all of us who are following this thread.
        >
        >
        >
        > Not to be disrespectful Eric, and I know you are well aware of this, but
        > please give me a moment more on this to see if I can make a positive
        > contribution here to what after all is an extremely important matter – in
        > the knowledge that if we here are not able to develop a common vocabulary
        > and broadly shared vision of the solution set, then the old mobility guys
        > are going to continue to rule the day.
        >
        >
        >
        > Our choice of words is ever dangerous, since it can in a single sweep
        > narrow the field of thought and choice, and in the process leave out of
        > sight what just may be our best solutions. Thus when we see that time-
        > blessed word “mass” (just after its good and often partner “rich”) and
        > then that other one “public transport” we suddenly are swept into a mental
        > architecture, a far too narrow room, which in my view simply does not
        > help us in the world in which we live.
        >
        >
        >
        > Here it is dear friends, suddenly a first clumsy step into the 21st
        > century -- and with the fury of economic and technological development the
        > patterns of travel have exploded in time and space we find ourselves
        > living in a world which is very different from the old days. And the old
        > vocabulary. The same old vocabulary that looked so good and so prescient
        > back when Uncle Karl was sitting there in the warmth of the Reading Room
        > of the British Library scratching out the vocabulary that dominated
        > thinking and policy in many places for the century ahead. But hey! it’s
        > 2006 and when we look out on the streets we simply do not see all that
        > many long lines of workers, lunch pails in hand and docilely waiting to
        > get to the factory or mine gates by opening time. Some yes, but there’s a
        > lot more to it than that.
        >
        >
        >
        > Let’s sep back and remind ourselves what is actually going on out there on
        > our streets. (And yes of course I know all you know this, but it just may
        > serve as a quick reminder, because clearly there are an awful lot of very
        > handsome people making policy decisions in the sector who apparently do
        > not fully understand the problematique.)
        >
        >
        >
        > So I went over to out little Global South video library this morning
        > (http://www.youtube.com/group/globalsouth) and picked out a handful of one
        > minute clips showing street action in cities in India, China, Bangladesh
        > and Vietnam – in an attempt to see if I might get the general idea across
        > in a few vivid minutes. I then popped in a little introduction and labeled
        > the whole thing with the following immortal prose:
        >
        >
        >
        > "Mass Transport" in the Global South. You tell me. Where are these people
        > going? And when do they want to go there? Will traditional public
        > transport do the job for all of them? Certainly no, and in many cases not
        > only on the grounds of the origin, destination and timing of travel, but
        > also on cost grounds. Should this be taken to mean that there is no room
        > for fixed route scheduled services in our cities in 2006? Of course there
        > is, but the demand patterns have changed and so must the supply. Probably
        > the biggest conundrum for planners and policy makers, above all in the
        > cities of the Global South.
        >
        >
        >
        > You can catch it at
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jcy2rBxesY&feature=PlayList&p=0ABE0A9AB3E4
        > C5FA&index=0&playnext=1
        >
        >
        >
        > And by the way if you look at the last clip showing Ho Chi Minh street in
        > Saigon, you will in addition to hundreds of motorized two and three
        > wheelers a bus. Slow down the image and count the number of people you
        > see on the bus. I guess that’s what we mean by “mass”. ;-)
        >
        >
        >
        > Eric Britton
        >
        >
        >
        > PS. If you do check out the videos, would you might sending me a very
        > short note informing me that you did. And were they useful? Thanks.
        >
        >
        >
        >
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