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An xTransit management challenge in Jakarta

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  • John.Ernst
    Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] Jakarta busway opens new corridors Paul, I can respond to some of your questions.... ... After constructing the first BRT corridor,
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 27, 2006
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      -----Original Message-----
       On Behalf Of John.Ernst
      Sent:
      Friday, January 27, 2006 8:41 AM
       Subject: [NewMobilityCafe]
      Jakarta busway opens new corridors

       

      Paul, I can respond to some of your questions....

      At
      12:59 AM 1/26/2006, Paul Barter wrote:
      >...> "As it is, the integrated ticketing system for both feeder
      > > buses and the busway does not work properly. In my
      > > experience, after buying the higher-priced tickets,
      > > conductors on the feeder buses still demand a fare because
      > > they do not recognize the integrated ticket," he
      > said.  {Darmaningtiyas, of Intrans and ITDP
      Indonesias}
      >Can anyone who knows the project explain more about how the
      >integrated ticketing was supposed to work and reasons for it going wrong?

      After constructing the first BRT corridor,
      Jakarta attempted to use
      existing bus routes to serve as "feeder" buses by selling an
      additional paper ticket with the BRT (busway) ticket for a slightly
      discounted price.  This paper ticket was then to be given instead of
      fare to the "feeder" bus conductor.

      The primary problem in the function of these tickets was/is that the
      bus operators do not trust they will get money when they turn in the
      tickets to the government.  (As this has been going on for almost
      2-years, I assume it is a persistent problem.)

      The vast majority of buses in
      Jakarta are private, and many of them
      are rented to the operators on a daily cash basis.  Any delay in
      getting fares causes considerable problems for the operators, so they
      frequently just refuse to accept the paper "feeder" tickets.

      >In some ways I find it impressive and ambitious that they even tried
      >to introduce integrated ticketing given that the regulatory
      >framework for buses in
      Jakarta (from what little I know) seems an
      >unlikely context for integrated ticketing reforms.  Can anyone say
      >more on this?

      Yes, you're right.  There is a lot of work to be done to improve the
      regulatory framework for the non-BRT buses in
      Jakarta.  TransJakarta
      tried a simple approach of selling a paper fare coupon without
      becoming entangled in route licensing.  It hasn't worked.  As the BRT
      expands, there is increasing need to rethink the non-BRT bus routes
      so that they can better complement the BRT system. 
      Jakarta has an
      advantage in that there is a general under-supply of buses, so
      reallocation is theoretically possible.  There are considerable
      issues in terms of the transparency of the route allocation process.

      >Given the existing regulatory context, does anyone have any
      >suggestions on how to improve integration (eg ease of transfers,
      >cheaper or free transfers) in public transort in
      Jakarta? Would the
      >regulation system have to change in order to achieve better integration?

      One issue that has to be addressed is the quality of service on many
      of the non-BRT buses in
      Jakarta.  The contrast to the BRT is so stark
      in some cases, that many BRT passengers would not consider riding the
      regular buses.

      Also,
      Jakarta has been looking at improving their current contactless
      fare card system and expanding it with readers on the regular buses
      (as has been implemented in cities such as
      Hong Kong and Sao
      Paulo
      ).  This allows a variety of fare integration possibilities, but
      surely challenging to implement.

      >  Finally, how imporatant does everyone think integration is for
      > public transport in low to middle-income cities, like
      Jakarta? Is
      > it a luxury for higher-income places or is it fundamental to the
      > improvement of public transport?

      Fare-integration seems more essential in lower-income areas, where a
      non-integrated fare is more of a burden on the passenger.

      John


      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      John Ernst   -  Director,
      Asia Region
          ITDP - The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
      Promoting environmentally sustainable and equitable transportation worldwide
        Visit http://www.itdp.org

      Tel: +1 (347) 694-4771   Fax: +1 (801) 365-5914    Skype: john.ernst
      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 



      -----Original Message-----
      From: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com [mailto:NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Paul.Barter@...
      Sent:
      Thursday, January 26, 2006 4:17 PM
      To: NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [NewMobilityCafe]
      Jakarta busway opens new corridors

      On Behalf Of Paul Barter
      Sent:
      Thursday, January 26, 2006 8:59 AM
      To:
      Asia and the Pacific sustainable transport
       

      Before I focus on a problem, first I want to say how impressed I am with Jakarta's progress on BRT, despite huge obstacles. This is not Bogota by a long shot but this is encouraging news nevertheless.

      Anyway, something caught my eye in the coverage of the new BRT corridors in Jakarta (which John Ernst posted on 19 Jan) 

       

      Ø       "As it is, the integrated ticketing system for both feeder  buses and the busway does not work properly. In my

      > experience, after buying the higher-priced tickets,
      black;?>conductors on the feeder buses still demand a fare because
      > they do not recognize the integrated ticket," he said.  {Darmaningtiyas, of
      Intrans and ITDP
      Indonesias}
       

      Can anyone who knows the project explain more about how the integrated ticketing was supposed to work and reasons for it going wrong?

      In some ways I find it impressive and ambitious that they even tried to introduce integrated ticketing given that the regulatory framework for buses in Jakarta (from what little I know) seems an unlikely context for integrated ticketing reforms.  Can anyone say more on this?

      Given the existing regulatory context, does anyone have any suggestions on how to improve integration (eg ease of transfers, cheaper or free transfers) in public transort in Jakarta? Would the regulation system have to change in order to achieve better integration?

      Finally, how imporatant does everyone think integration is for public transport in low to middle-income cities, like Jakarta ? Is it a luxury for higher-income places or is it fundamental to the improvement of public transport?

      Paul

      Paul A. Barter  |  Assistant Professor  |  LKY School of Public Policy  |  National University of Singapore  |  29 Heng Mui Keng Terrace  |  Singapore 119620  |  Tel: +65-6516 3324  |  Fax: +65-6778 1020  |  Email:  paulbarter@...  |  http://www.spp.nus.edu.sg/faculty/paulbarter/  

       

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