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Behnke on smart jitneys, etc.

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  • steveraneyc21
    from http://www.portlandtribune.com/archview.cgi?id=33337 we join the article in midstream, Bob Behnke is discussing a chat with Joel Garreau (author of Edge
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 6, 2006
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      from http://www.portlandtribune.com/archview.cgi?id=33337

      we join the article in midstream, Bob Behnke is discussing a chat
      with Joel Garreau (author of Edge City):

      "When he was in Portland, Garreau and I discussed ways to integrate
      smart jitneys with conventional transit, paratransit (e.g., taxi,
      dial-a-ride minibuses, shuttles) and ride-sharing services in order
      to make public transportation systems more user-friendly and more
      taxpayer-friendly, even in low-density areas.
      Smart jitneys would operate in travel corridors when and where
      big-box transit is not cost-effective, including feeder services to
      bus and rail stations, and to handle peak loads. They would provide
      backup transportation to those who prefer to car pool or walk or
      bicycle most of the time.
      Market research conducted by the University of Washington for the
      U.S. Department of Transportation found that 42 percent of drivers
      of single-occupant vehicles would consider using smart-jitney
      services if they were available.
      Garreau and I also discussed integrating smart-jitney dispatching
      and congestion pricing with many other wireless-Internet
      applications to form "smart community" systems that could reduce
      traffic congestion, gasoline consumption, air pollution, parking and
      mobility problems, and create a wide variety of new business,
      employment, education and recreation opportunities for local
      residents at a low cost to users and taxpayers."

      Also on Behnke, from VTPI http://www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm34.htm

      Minerva Dynamic Ridesharing Service (Behnke, 1996)

      The Minerva System uses cellular phones, palmtop computers, and
      wireless data communications to provide low-cost, door-to-door
      transportation in low-density areas and low travel corridors. The
      service can be integrated with conventional transit, paratransit and
      ridesharing services, plus consumer services such as home shopping,
      telebanking and e-mail, to help reduce the need for some trips
      altogether. The Oregon State legislature has committed $1.5 million
      to this project, with additional commitments of $3 million in
      matching funds from local pilot sites, and $1 million in in-kind
      support from private management consulting outfits.
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