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Re: [WWWEDU] Another Cyberbullying Suicide

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  • Art Wolinsky
    ... The fraudulent account is probably only a violation of the MySpace Terms of Service and there probably isn t any law with any kind of teeth that was
    Message 1 of 22 , Nov 17, 2007
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      At 02:58 PM 11/17/2007, you wrote:
      >No crime?
      >
      >How about the fraudulent account created (as admitted by the mother of
      >the other girl) to communicate with Megan and caused the suicide?

      The fraudulent account is probably only a violation of the MySpace
      Terms of Service and there probably isn't any law with any kind of
      teeth that was broken. It's sad that you can steal a pack of bubble
      gum and go to jail, but you can get away with this kind of thing.
      Here's a link to a very detailed article in the St. Charles Journal
      that gives a lot more insight.
      http://stcharlesjournal.stltoday.com/articles/2007/11/10/news/sj2tn20071110-1111stc_pokin_1.ii1.txt

      Art


      Art Wolinsky
      OEO 3DWriting.com
      Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
      Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
      awolinsky@...
      (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
      (609) 618-4433 (Cell)

      I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
      I will surely learn a great deal today.
    • Nancy Willard
      I am going to be on a Good Morning America interview tomorrow morning about this story. Taped about 20 minutes ­ will probably use 10 seconds. ;-) Criminal
      Message 2 of 22 , Nov 17, 2007
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        I am going to be on a Good Morning America interview tomorrow morning about
        this story. Taped about 20 minutes ­ will probably use 10 seconds. ;-)

        Criminal solutions are not really a solution ­ because this only will cause
        an impact after the harm has been done. We have to be doing prevention. And
        schools are the institutions that need to be taking on this responsibility.
        The bullying is almost always related to student harmful interactions and
        even if it is off-campus the impact will come back to school.. The problem
        is that too many school administrators and counselors and even school
        resource officers do not understand the online world. Further in many
        schools even if a student reports something bad in happening online the safe
        school person cannot even go and look to assess the problem ­ because the
        filter is blocking access.

        Lack of understanding about the legal ramifications is the other major
        problem. I have been working diligently on new instructional materials on
        this.

        Nancy
        --
        Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
        Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
        http://csriu.org
        http://cyberbully.org
        http://cyber-safe-kids.com
        nwillard@...

        Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
        Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

        Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
        Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Nadia Kalman
        But in this case, it was the parents of another student who tormented Megan Meier. Other parents in the community knew what the Drews were doing, yet remained
        Message 3 of 22 , Nov 17, 2007
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          But in this case, it was the parents of another student who tormented Megan Meier. Other parents in the community knew what the Drews were doing, yet remained silent. How are schools meant to "take on this responsibility"? Are teachers now meant to be assessing the psychological makeup of parents?



          To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.comFrom: nwillard@...: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 15:04:40 -0800Subject: Re: [WWWEDU] Another Cyberbullying Suicide




          I am going to be on a Good Morning America interview tomorrow morning aboutthis story. Taped about 20 minutes ­ will probably use 10 seconds. ;-)Criminal solutions are not really a solution ­ because this only will causean impact after the harm has been done. We have to be doing prevention. Andschools are the institutions that need to be taking on this responsibility.The bullying is almost always related to student harmful interactions andeven if it is off-campus the impact will come back to school.. The problemis that too many school administrators and counselors and even schoolresource officers do not understand the online world. Further in manyschools even if a student reports something bad in happening online the safeschool person cannot even go and look to assess the problem ­ because thefilter is blocking access.Lack of understanding about the legal ramifications is the other majorproblem. I have been working diligently on new instructional materials onthis. Nancy-- Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Usehttp://csriu.orghttp://cyberbully.orghttp://cyber-safe-kids.comnwillard@... and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online SocialAggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use theInternet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Nancy Willard
          Schools are the best vehicle to provide education to parents and students and to intervene formally or informally. Even if this is happening off-campus, the
          Message 4 of 22 , Nov 18, 2007
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            Schools are the best vehicle to provide education to parents and students
            and to intervene formally or informally. Even if this is happening
            off-campus, the impact comes to school ­ and you might want to remember that
            over 75% of the school shooters were victims of bullying. Cyberbullying is
            resulting in school avoidance, school failure, school violence, and youth
            suicide ­ which certainly impact the school community is very profound ways.
            So this IS the business of schools.

            Also, the reports were that Megan was the victim of bullying since 3rd
            grade. This is outrageous ­ and the school certainly should have been more
            proactive. And I have heard that in addition to this hoax, nasty things were
            being said about Megan on other sites. I do not know if this was reported to
            the school. There are major issues related to when schools can intervene
            with formal discipline to cases involving off-campus speech. I have been
            working on legal analysis and strategies for this all summer.

            What I do not know is whether the parents reported the problem about the
            other material to the school and what their response was. I am hearing far
            too many stories about children who are so abused by material posted online
            that they are unwilling to attend school, try to change schools but the
            material follows them, and so on. AND I am hearing far too many stories that
            indicate the administrators are taking NO responsibility whatsoever for
            addressing these situations. This has to change.

            As far as I can tell the reasons they are not responding include: 1. They do
            not know what to do. 2. The legal standards are unclear and they think they
            will get sued if they do anything. I also think the fact that many school
            administrators do not really understand the technologies is playing a big
            role. Administrators are ³in charge² kinds of people. So if they do not
            understand something, they tend to have a difficult time dealing with the
            situation.

            Nancy


            > But in this case, it was the parents of another student who tormented Megan
            > Meier. Other parents in the community knew what the Drews were doing, yet
            > remained silent. How are schools meant to "take on this responsibility"? Are
            > teachers now meant to be assessing the psychological makeup of parents?
            >
            >
            > To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.comFrom <mailto:wwwedu%40yahoogroups.comFrom> :
            > nwillard@... <mailto:nwillard%40csriu.orgDate> : Sat, 17 Nov 2007
            > 15:04:40 -0800Subject: Re: [WWWEDU] Another Cyberbullying Suicide
            >
            > I am going to be on a Good Morning America interview tomorrow morning
            > aboutthis story. Taped about 20 minutes ­ will probably use 10 seconds.
            > ;-)Criminal solutions are not really a solution ­ because this only will
            > causean impact after the harm has been done. We have to be doing prevention.
            > Andschools are the institutions that need to be taking on this
            > responsibility.The bullying is almost always related to student harmful
            > interactions andeven if it is off-campus the impact will come back to school..
            > The problemis that too many school administrators and counselors and even
            > schoolresource officers do not understand the online world. Further in
            > manyschools even if a student reports something bad in happening online the
            > safeschool person cannot even go and look to assess the problem ­ because
            > thefilter is blocking access.Lack of understanding about the legal
            > ramifications is the other majorproblem. I have been working diligently on new
            > instructional materials onthis. Nancy-- Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.Center for
            > Safe and Responsible Internet
            > Usehttp://csriu.orghttp://cyberbully.orghttp://cyber-safe-kids.comnwillard@csr
            > iu.orgCyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online
            > SocialAggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)Cyber-Safe Kids,
            > Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use theInternet Safely and
            > Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >


            --
            Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
            Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
            http://csriu.org
            http://cyberbully.org
            http://cyber-safe-kids.com
            nwillard@...

            Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
            Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

            Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
            Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Art Wolinsky
            ... I won t speak for Nancy, but since this is a subject I address, I ll briefly answer for myself. Schools MUST take responsibility for bullying awareness
            Message 5 of 22 , Nov 18, 2007
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              At 11:35 PM 11/17/2007, you wrote:

              >But in this case, it was the parents of another student who
              >tormented Megan Meier. Other parents in the community knew what the
              >Drews were doing, yet remained silent. How are schools meant to
              >"take on this responsibility"? Are teachers now meant to be
              >assessing the psychological makeup of parents?

              I won't speak for Nancy, but since this is a subject I address, I'll
              briefly answer for myself. Schools MUST take responsibility for
              bullying awareness and prevention. A study that was just released in
              the UK showed that in the last 18 months in the UK 223,410 kids
              between 11 and 16 were driven to the brink of suicide by bullying
              with 16 actual suicides. Those number are staggering!

              Cyberbullying is simply a new subset of bullying that has been
              plaguing schools forever. Dealing with the problem requires a
              systemic approach. Schools are not solely responsible for this, but
              they certainly most must assume a lead role. All to often in the
              past, the problem was ignored, denied, or simply considered part of
              growing up. Those attitudes are no longer acceptable.

              And as far as schools being responsible for the psychological makeup
              of parents go, parents were once students and the values the carry
              today may well reflect on the attitude their schools took toward bullying.

              Art

              Art Wolinsky
              OEO 3DWriting.com
              Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
              Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
              awolinsky@...
              (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
              (609) 618-4433 (Cell)

              I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
              I will surely learn a great deal today.
            • Robert D. Sharp
              I think or at least I hope, one of Nancy s major points is that Resource Officers (i.e., Police) can t access the posts [from schools] because of the filters.
              Message 6 of 22 , Nov 18, 2007
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                I think or at least I hope, one of Nancy's major points is that
                Resource Officers (i.e., Police) can't access the posts [from schools]
                because of the filters. In my school district, often anything coming
                from common blog engines were blocked. Also, if the IP were traceable
                to a public library the Police could not do anything about it because
                many library policies cause any record of computer activity and usage
                to be dumped frequently and therefore untraceable.

                In places where there is no school resource officer, the
                administration is still subject to the same filter limitations as the
                staff. One could argue that these officials could go to their IT
                department and request that the particular site be removed from the
                "black list" but in a school/district with no IT department or IT
                does not control the blocked list directly what are they to do?

                As we read in the article, or at least I did, the time between
                incident and permanent damage is often critically brief.

                I often strongly disagree with the statement that it is the school's
                responsibility to do all of this but in so many cases we have made the
                school the focus of the children's lives that until we have full
                service schools, i.e., a center of all community services including
                adequate social services [full time psychologists, psychiatrists],
                medical facilities, etc. schools will be charged with duties it can
                not adequately perform.

                You are right, in this case, where was the action from the others in
                the community? The kids were attending different schools, the
                activity, i.e., MySpace cyberbullying, was occurring at home. What
                governing agency other than parental adults were aware?

                Nancy is making the general case of when and where schools are aware,
                even if the activity is out of school, most of the time the children
                in school is often aware of what going on and could/should report it
                to _properly_trained_school_officials (emphasis mine).

                On Nov 17, 2007, at 8:35 PM, Nadia Kalman wrote:

                > But in this case, it was the parents of another student who
                > tormented Megan Meier. Other parents in the community knew what the
                > Drews were doing, yet remained silent. How are schools meant to
                > "take on this responsibility"? Are teachers now meant to be
                > assessing the psychological makeup of parents?

                --
                It has been said before but warrants repeating, "If you think
                education is expensive, try ignorance."

                Robert D. Sharp, Co-Owner, Sharp Education Consulting and Marketing.
                Teacher, Retired after 34 years, Science, Computers, Mathematics,
                Technology
                Past Middle School Representative to the NCCE Board
                Recipient of The First Annual Learning Space Achievement Awards for
                Members





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Nancy Willard
                Resource officers, counselors, psychologists, and principals ALL MUST have the ability and authority to immediately bypass the filter to be able to access any
                Message 7 of 22 , Nov 18, 2007
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                  Resource officers, counselors, psychologists, and principals ALL MUST have
                  the ability and authority to immediately bypass the filter to be able to
                  access any site on the Internet to review material posted by students to
                  assess student and school safety!!!!!

                  Here is the example I provide in my instruction (Feel free to borrow ­ In
                  fact PLEASE take this to your district administration and say ³we have to do
                  something about this):

                  Ally comes to a counselor and tells the counselor that Sara has been being
                  bullied on MySpace and has just posted material that Ally thinks makes it
                  appear the Sara might be thinking of committing suicide. It is highly likely
                  (hopefully) that these profiles are private. So the ONLY one who can provide
                  the counselor with access to this material is Ally (who may have a test in
                  her next period). Even if it were a public profile, there is NO WAY this
                  counselor will be able to find it.

                  Or try this example of material posted online: ³Philosophy So that¹s the
                  only way to solve arguments with all you $%&*heads out there. I just kill
                  you! God I cant wait till I can kill you people. Feel no remorse. No shame.
                  I don¹t care if I live or die in the shootout, all I want to do is to kill
                  and injure as many of you pricks as I can, especially a few people. Like
                  (name of student).² If a resource officer has something like this turned in,
                  he or she MUST be able to immediately get to the site to see what else has
                  been posted.

                  Perhaps I should mention that the above statement was posted by Eric Harris
                  ­ Columbine. (And would you believe the police knew about this?)

                  Whenever the filter is bypassed, there is a record. So there can be
                  accountability. I suggest that the district have a web form where any person
                  who has the authority to bypass the filter ­ and does ­ simply reports:
                  Date, Approximate time, Bypass accomplished by, At the request of, For the
                  purpose of, URLs accessed (no need to report all ­ but just general area).

                  It would also really help if ed tech staff could put together a training for
                  your district¹s safe school staff on these sites. One of the reasons
                  administrators do not want to respond to cyberbullying is that they do not
                  want to appear the fool because they do not understand how to negotiate
                  these sites. They really need to know all about the sites so they feel at
                  least somewhat comfortable in the environment.

                  Nancy

                  >
                  > I think or at least I hope, one of Nancy's major points is that
                  > Resource Officers (i.e., Police) can't access the posts [from schools]
                  > because of the filters. In my school district, often anything coming
                  > from common blog engines were blocked. Also, if the IP were traceable
                  > to a public library the Police could not do anything about it because
                  > many library policies cause any record of computer activity and usage
                  > to be dumped frequently and therefore untraceable.
                  >
                  > In places where there is no school resource officer, the
                  > administration is still subject to the same filter limitations as the
                  > staff. One could argue that these officials could go to their IT
                  > department and request that the particular site be removed from the
                  > "black list" but in a school/district with no IT department or IT
                  > does not control the blocked list directly what are they to do?
                  >
                  > As we read in the article, or at least I did, the time between
                  > incident and permanent damage is often critically brief.
                  >
                  > I often strongly disagree with the statement that it is the school's
                  > responsibility to do all of this but in so many cases we have made the
                  > school the focus of the children's lives that until we have full
                  > service schools, i.e., a center of all community services including
                  > adequate social services [full time psychologists, psychiatrists],
                  > medical facilities, etc. schools will be charged with duties it can
                  > not adequately perform.
                  >
                  > You are right, in this case, where was the action from the others in
                  > the community? The kids were attending different schools, the
                  > activity, i.e., MySpace cyberbullying, was occurring at home. What
                  > governing agency other than parental adults were aware?
                  >
                  > Nancy is making the general case of when and where schools are aware,
                  > even if the activity is out of school, most of the time the children
                  > in school is often aware of what going on and could/should report it
                  > to _properly_trained_school_officials (emphasis mine).
                  >
                  > On Nov 17, 2007, at 8:35 PM, Nadia Kalman wrote:
                  >
                  >> > But in this case, it was the parents of another student who
                  >> > tormented Megan Meier. Other parents in the community knew what the
                  >> > Drews were doing, yet remained silent. How are schools meant to
                  >> > "take on this responsibility"? Are teachers now meant to be
                  >> > assessing the psychological makeup of parents?
                  >
                  > --
                  > It has been said before but warrants repeating, "If you think
                  > education is expensive, try ignorance."
                  >
                  > Robert D. Sharp, Co-Owner, Sharp Education Consulting and Marketing.
                  > Teacher, Retired after 34 years, Science, Computers, Mathematics,
                  > Technology
                  > Past Middle School Representative to the NCCE Board
                  > Recipient of The First Annual Learning Space Achievement Awards for
                  > Members
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >


                  --
                  Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                  Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                  http://csriu.org
                  http://cyberbully.org
                  http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                  nwillard@...

                  Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                  Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                  Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                  Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Carla Beard
                  Art, I find myself in the unusual position of disagreeing with you. To say schools must take responsibility for bullying awareness and prevention is to say
                  Message 8 of 22 , Nov 19, 2007
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                    Art,

                    I find myself in the unusual position of disagreeing with you. To say "schools must take responsibility for bullying awareness and prevention" is to say that schools can be held accountable -- boards of education, superintendents, principals, and teachers can be taken to jail -- the next time an adolescent is bullied to the point of suicide. I agree with you that schools play an important role in this area and that instruction in dealing with bullying is an appropriate use of school time. In other words, I agree with your statement up to the word "awareness."

                    Certainly what happened to Megan Meier was tragic. But should Megan's algebra teacher go to jail for it because s/he failed to prevent it? Should the school board be held liable because the school failed to prevent it? I think not.


                    Carla Beard
                    Web English Teacher
                    www.webenglishteacher.com





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Art Wolinsky
                    ... Hi Carla, Then we will respectfully agree to disagree. :-) The fact is that in NJ, state law requires every school district to have a bullying policy in
                    Message 9 of 22 , Nov 20, 2007
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                      At 04:40 PM 11/19/2007, you wrote:

                      >Art,
                      >
                      >I find myself in the unusual position of disagreeing with you. To
                      >say "schools must take responsibility for bullying awareness and
                      >prevention" is to say that schools can be held accountable -- boards
                      >of education, superintendents, principals, and teachers can be taken
                      >to jail -- the next time an adolescent is bullied to the point of suicide.

                      Hi Carla,

                      Then we will respectfully agree to disagree. :-)

                      The fact is that in NJ, state law requires every school district to
                      have a bullying policy in place. Failure to uphold of follow it
                      certainly can result in sanctions against the school or
                      teacher. However, that is a far cry from being sued because of a
                      child being driven to suicide. As long as the school follows the
                      policy and exercises due diligence, they are held safe from
                      prosecution law suits. Even if they don't follow the policy to the
                      letter, it would be difficult to prove that the schools inaction was causative.

                      When I give workshops, one of the questions I always ask the teachers
                      is whether their school has a bullying policy. Unfortunately, very
                      often many of the teachers are not even aware that the policy exists.

                      Absolutely, it isn't solely the responsibility of the school,
                      especially for prevention. If parental awareness is carried out and
                      notification given to parents about incidents of bullying, that does
                      a great deal to shift the responsibility on to the shoulders of the
                      parents. As I said, a systemic approach is necessary. That includes
                      schools, students, parents, and community organizations all getting on board.

                      If a child shows ANY signs of parental abuse, teachers can be held
                      responsible if they don't report it. Hardly ever will a child
                      approach a teacher if such abuse is taking place. It is usually the
                      teacher who spots the tell tale signs. Why then do teachers ignore
                      or minimize a child's complaint about being bullied. Worse yet, why
                      do some turn a blind eye when they witness bullying. Is excuse that
                      it's part a normal part of growing up an acceptable one?

                      Art

                      Art Wolinsky
                      OEO 3DWriting.com
                      Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                      Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                      awolinsky@...
                      (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
                      (609) 618-4433 (Cell)

                      I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                      I will surely learn a great deal today.
                    • Art Wolinsky
                      ... I really appreciate it when people disagree with me. It forces me to think a bit deeper. In this case, I took a closer look at the problem, by thinking
                      Message 10 of 22 , Nov 20, 2007
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                        At 04:40 PM 11/19/2007, you wrote:

                        >Art,
                        >
                        >I find myself in the unusual position of disagreeing with you.

                        I really appreciate it when people disagree with me. It forces me to
                        think a bit deeper. In this case, I took a closer look at the
                        problem, by thinking about my life as a bullying victim. I was 4'9"
                        and 89 poounds in the 9th grade. As the second smallest kid in the
                        jr. high, I knew well what goes through the mind of someone who is
                        bullied. I wrote about it in my blog.
                        http://www.3dwriting.com/wiredsafety/blog/2007/11/what-it-feels-like-to-be-bullied.html

                        However, the thought that bubbled to the surface as I recounted a
                        potentially tragic event in the 6th grade is that building empathy in
                        the minds of the bully often does little to stop the cycle, because
                        the bully often knows well what his victim is experiencing.

                        For me, home was my safe haven and school was my nightmare. For the
                        bully in my story, home that was the nightmare and school the safe
                        haven and the place where he expressed his anger at the abuse
                        inflicted upon him. In retrospect, I think that was probably far
                        worse than what I endured.

                        So Carla, thanks for disagreeing with me. While I still feel that
                        schools are responsible for teaching awareness and prevention, that
                        responsibility must be shared equally by parents and community. If
                        anything, perhaps my characterization of the problem requiring a
                        systemic approach is too narrow. Perhaps a community approach is
                        even too narrow. It is a universal problem and a global issue that
                        needs to be learned by toddlers on up through world leaders.

                        Not an easy task.

                        Art

                        Art Wolinsky
                        OEO 3DWriting.com
                        Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                        Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                        awolinsky@...
                        (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
                        (609) 618-4433 (Cell)

                        I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                        I will surely learn a great deal today.
                      • Nancy Willard
                        I will disagree with you also ­ but not on the issue of going to jail. If a student is being cyberbullied and there are accompanying on-campus harmful acts
                        Message 11 of 22 , Nov 20, 2007
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                          I will disagree with you also ­ but not on the issue of going to jail. If a
                          student is being cyberbullied and there are accompanying on-campus harmful
                          acts related to this and the student becomes depressed, starts failing
                          and/or avoiding school, etc, and the school officials are informed of the
                          problem and do nothing because they say it is off campus and they can¹t do
                          anything (which is not legally accurate) and this child commits suicide,
                          they I think a law suit against the school IS appropriate. This is
                          ³deliberate indifference² (the legal standard applied) to a student who is
                          being harmed.

                          A school district in Florida was just held liable to the tune of over $4
                          million for failing to stop ongoing bullying of a child that ultimately
                          resulted in an attack that left the child with permanent injuries.

                          Schools can impose formal discipline for off-campus speech if that speech
                          has caused or threatens to cause a substantial disruption at school or
                          interference with students rights to be secure. Various court cases have
                          outlined some of the boundaries of this. Substantial disruption has been
                          found in instances where there is or could be a significant interference
                          with instruction or school operations, a hostile environment interfering
                          with the rights of students to receive instruction, and physical or verbal
                          violent altercations.

                          Megan¹s parents are trying to get a criminal law. This is likely to be very
                          hard. But civil litigation is clearly available. There are 3 legal theories
                          that frequently could be relied on in cases of cyberbullying: defamation,
                          invasion of personal privacy, and intentional infliction of emotional
                          distress. This last theory is the one Megan¹s parents should use against
                          this woman ­ and they would clearly win.

                          I am working on a series of narrated Powerpoints on these legal issues that
                          will be ready after the first of the year.

                          Nancy



                          > At 04:40 PM 11/19/2007, you wrote:
                          >
                          >> >Art,
                          >> >
                          >> >I find myself in the unusual position of disagreeing with you. To
                          >> >say "schools must take responsibility for bullying awareness and
                          >> >prevention" is to say that schools can be held accountable -- boards
                          >> >of education, superintendents, principals, and teachers can be taken
                          >> >to jail -- the next time an adolescent is bullied to the point of suicide.
                          >
                          > Hi Carla,
                          >
                          > Then we will respectfully agree to disagree. :-)
                          >
                          > The fact is that in NJ, state law requires every school district to
                          > have a bullying policy in place. Failure to uphold of follow it
                          > certainly can result in sanctions against the school or
                          > teacher. However, that is a far cry from being sued because of a
                          > child being driven to suicide. As long as the school follows the
                          > policy and exercises due diligence, they are held safe from
                          > prosecution law suits. Even if they don't follow the policy to the
                          > letter, it would be difficult to prove that the schools inaction was
                          > causative.
                          >
                          > When I give workshops, one of the questions I always ask the teachers
                          > is whether their school has a bullying policy. Unfortunately, very
                          > often many of the teachers are not even aware that the policy exists.
                          >
                          > Absolutely, it isn't solely the responsibility of the school,
                          > especially for prevention. If parental awareness is carried out and
                          > notification given to parents about incidents of bullying, that does
                          > a great deal to shift the responsibility on to the shoulders of the
                          > parents. As I said, a systemic approach is necessary. That includes
                          > schools, students, parents, and community organizations all getting on board.
                          >
                          > If a child shows ANY signs of parental abuse, teachers can be held
                          > responsible if they don't report it. Hardly ever will a child
                          > approach a teacher if such abuse is taking place. It is usually the
                          > teacher who spots the tell tale signs. Why then do teachers ignore
                          > or minimize a child's complaint about being bullied. Worse yet, why
                          > do some turn a blind eye when they witness bullying. Is excuse that
                          > it's part a normal part of growing up an acceptable one?
                          >
                          > Art
                          >
                          > Art Wolinsky
                          > OEO 3DWriting.com
                          > Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                          > Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                          > awolinsky@... <mailto:awolinsky%403dwriting.com>
                          > (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
                          > (609) 618-4433 (Cell)
                          >
                          > I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                          > I will surely learn a great deal today.
                          >
                          >


                          --
                          Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                          Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                          http://csriu.org
                          http://cyberbully.org
                          http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                          nwillard@...

                          Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                          Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                          Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                          Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)




                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Taran Rampersad
                          ... I think that schools should be responsible for *awareness* and *prevention*, the latter to some degree. I also believe that parents should be responsible
                          Message 12 of 22 , Nov 20, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Carla Beard wrote:
                            >
                            > Art,
                            >
                            > I find myself in the unusual position of disagreeing with you. To say
                            > "schools must take responsibility for bullying awareness and
                            > prevention" is to say that schools can be held accountable -- boards
                            > of education, superintendents, principals, and teachers can be taken
                            > to jail -- the next time an adolescent is bullied to the point of
                            > suicide. I agree with you that schools play an important role in this
                            > area and that instruction in dealing with bullying is an appropriate
                            > use of school time. In other words, I agree with your statement up to
                            > the word "awareness."
                            >
                            > Certainly what happened to Megan Meier was tragic. But should Megan's
                            > algebra teacher go to jail for it because s/he failed to prevent it?
                            > Should the school board be held liable because the school failed to
                            > prevent it? I think not.
                            >
                            >
                            > Carla Beard
                            > Web English Teacher
                            > www.webenglishteacher.com
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >

                            I think that schools should be responsible for *awareness* and
                            *prevention*, the latter to some degree. I also believe that parents
                            should be responsible for *awareness* and *prevention*. I think society
                            as a whole should be responsible for *awareness* and *prevention*. If we
                            are to talk consequences, society does indeed pay a price for failing to
                            work on awareness and prevention. Atomizing it to discern legal
                            culpability is folly, but it is a folly that is required by the present
                            bureaucracy built on the foundation of misting legal responsibility.

                            But legal responsibility and moral responsibility are very separate
                            issues. Society is constantly trying to codify law to assure societal
                            issues are handled. I would think that the issue is not who is legally
                            responsible - rather, I would think that the issue is related to who is
                            morally responsible. If necessary, we can codify that later.

                            Should an algebra teacher go to jail over a suicide? Only if you toss
                            everyone who was near the teen into jail too. That would include the
                            parents. Teaching accountability and responsibility starts at home, not
                            at school.

                            So, at a moral culpability level, I completely agree with Art. Schools
                            should be making awareness and prevention of these issues more visible -
                            especially if we expect schools to introduce the same technology to
                            students. The key of technology opens the gates to Heaven and Hell. If
                            you promise Heaven, then Hell exists - thus Hell, too, must be explained.

                            --
                            Taran Rampersad
                            Presently in: Orlando, Florida
                            cnd@...

                            http://www.knowprose.com
                            http://www.your2ndplace.com

                            Pictures: http://www.flickr.com/photos/knowprose/

                            "Criticize by creating." — Michelangelo
                            "The present is theirs; the future, for which I really worked, is mine." - Nikola Tesla
                          • Taran Rampersad
                            ... Yes and no. If the student is so depressed and dejected that the school should notice, it stands to reason that parents or legal guardians should also
                            Message 13 of 22 , Nov 20, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Nancy Willard wrote:
                              >> I will disagree with you also ­ but not on the issue of going to
                              >> jail. If a
                              >> student is being cyberbullied and there are accompanying on-campus
                              >> harmful
                              >> acts related to this and the student becomes depressed, starts failing
                              >> and/or avoiding school, etc, and the school officials are informed of the
                              >> problem and do nothing because they say it is off campus and they
                              >> can¹t do
                              >> anything (which is not legally accurate) and this child commits suicide,
                              >> they I think a law suit against the school IS appropriate. This is
                              >> ³deliberate indifference² (the legal standard applied) to a student
                              >> who is
                              >> being harmed.
                              > ._,_._,___

                              Yes and no. If the student is so depressed and dejected that the school
                              should notice, it stands to reason that parents or legal guardians
                              should also notice. If the educational system is to be sued, why not the
                              procreational system? I would think deliberate indifference would count
                              more at home than strangers at school. That the law would hold the
                              teachers responsible and vindicate the parents/legal guardians is
                              assinine. But then, the legal system also allows burglars to sue if they
                              get hurt in someone's home because they failed to label a poisonous
                              substance.

                              At some point, everyone is accountable.

                              --
                              Taran Rampersad
                              Presently in: Orlando, Florida
                              cnd@...

                              http://www.knowprose.com
                              http://www.your2ndplace.com

                              Pictures: http://www.flickr.com/photos/knowprose/

                              "Criticize by creating." — Michelangelo
                              "The present is theirs; the future, for which I really worked, is mine." - Nikola Tesla
                            • TeacherBC@aol.com
                              As a New Jersey principal, I have confronted the issue of cyber-bullying on a number of occasions. By definition, of course, these incidents tend to occur off
                              Message 14 of 22 , Nov 21, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                As a New Jersey principal, I have confronted the issue of cyber-bullying on
                                a number of occasions. By definition, of course, these incidents tend to
                                occur off school grounds. The standard that we typically apply is one that "the
                                incident would not have occurred were it not for the fact that there was an
                                in-school relationship which precipitated the event."

                                The local police department has taken a similar view and has been
                                instrumental in obtaining IP addresses, AOL accounts, and other information necessary
                                for us to take action.

                                One of the primary problems that causes this, as I have experienced it, is
                                the lack of knowledge on the part of parents of both the bullying party and the
                                victim. Students' electronic worlds, through cell phone and computer use,
                                is typically outside of adult eyes--and, all too unfortunately, beyond adult
                                comprehension. The ignorance of parents and families when it comes to SMS
                                messaging, voice mail, and instant messaging and e-mail is woeful.

                                On an unrelated note, the County prosecutor recently offered a workshop on
                                Internet Safety for our entire district (one of nearly 8,000 students. Sadly,
                                there were more administrators in the audience than there were parents. A
                                total of ten families attended. The program was outstanding, BTW!!

                                That being said, the school does have the legal and moral obligation to act
                                to curb the bullying once officials become aware of it. New Jersey courts
                                have been VERY clear that schools are accountable and liable for this behavior,
                                whether it occurs on or off of school grounds. Civil damages and
                                administrative punitive actions have been awarded on numerous occasions.

                                With all of the issues confronting school officials these days, and the
                                significant length of time it takes to adequately investigate these kinds of
                                claims--and ESPECIALLY, the lack of knowledge on the part of school
                                administrators--such bullying claims tend to be under-reported, under-investigated, and
                                poorly handled by schools and local law enforcement agencies as well.

                                The question also arises regarding a child's "right" to privacy when it
                                comes to e-mail, social networking, instant messaging and other similar online
                                behaviors. SHOULD parents install keystroke and/or IM monitoring software
                                without their children's knowledge? Is merely talking to children about safety
                                online sufficient? A small application such as WATCHRIGHT software can give
                                parents access to their children's mail and messages. Does the fact that we
                                can mean that we should, given experiences such as the one highlighted in this
                                thread?

                                William Ciullo
                                _TeacherBC@..._ (mailto:TeacherBC@...)
                                New Jersey Principal




                                In a message dated 11/21/2007 6:39:57 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                                cnd@... writes:

                                Nancy Willard wrote:
                                >> I will disagree with you also ­ but not on the issue of going to
                                >> jail. If a
                                >> student is being cyberbullied and there are accompanying on-campus
                                >> harmful
                                >> acts related to this and the student becomes depressed, starts failing
                                >> and/or avoiding school, etc, and the school officials are informed of the
                                >> problem and do nothing because they say it is off campus and they
                                >> can¹t do
                                >> anything (which is not legally accurate) and this child commits suicide,
                                >> they I think a law suit against the school IS appropriate. This is
                                >> ³deliberate indifference² (the legal standard applied) to a student
                                >> who is
                                >> being harmed.
                                > ._,_._,___

                                Yes and no. If the student is so depressed and dejected that the school
                                should notice, it stands to reason that parents or legal guardians
                                should also notice. If the educational system is to be sued, why not the
                                procreational system? I would think deliberate indifference would count
                                more at home than strangers at school. That the law would hold the
                                teachers responsible and vindicate the parents/legal guardians is
                                assinine. But then, the legal system also allows burglars to sue if they
                                get hurt in someone's home because they failed to label a poisonous
                                substance.

                                At some point, everyone is accountable.

                                --
                                Taran Rampersad
                                Presently in: Orlando, Florida
                                cnd@...

                                http://www.knowprose.com
                                http://www.your2ndplace.com

                                Pictures: http://www.flickr.com/photos/knowprose/

                                "Criticize by creating." — Michelangelo
                                "The present is theirs; the future, for which I really worked, is mine." -
                                Nikola Tesla




                                WWWEDU, The Web and Education Discussion Group
                                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wwwedu
                                http://www.edwebproject.org/wwwedu.html

                                Yahoo! Groups Links








                                **************************************Check out AOL's list of 2007's hottest
                                products.
                                (http://money.aol.com/special/hot-products-2007?NCID=aoltop00030000000001)


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Nancy Willard
                                In my scenario I presuppose that the parents do know and are striving to deal with the situation. But if the school simply turns a cold shoulder and says not
                                Message 15 of 22 , Nov 21, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  In my scenario I presuppose that the parents do know and are striving to
                                  deal with the situation. But if the school simply turns a cold shoulder and
                                  says "not on campus, not our problem" when there clearly IS an impact on
                                  campus and they clearly CAN do something, I do think there is the potential
                                  of liability. And if the students are using district technology resources to
                                  accomplish the cyberbullying, then there is clearly a responsibility.

                                  Nancy


                                  > Nancy Willard wrote:
                                  >>> I will disagree with you also ­ but not on the issue of going to
                                  >>> jail. If a
                                  >>> student is being cyberbullied and there are accompanying on-campus
                                  >>> harmful
                                  >>> acts related to this and the student becomes depressed, starts failing
                                  >>> and/or avoiding school, etc, and the school officials are informed of the
                                  >>> problem and do nothing because they say it is off campus and they
                                  >>> can¹t do
                                  >>> anything (which is not legally accurate) and this child commits suicide,
                                  >>> they I think a law suit against the school IS appropriate. This is
                                  >>> ³deliberate indifference² (the legal standard applied) to a student
                                  >>> who is
                                  >>> being harmed.
                                  >> ._,_._,___
                                  >
                                  > Yes and no. If the student is so depressed and dejected that the school
                                  > should notice, it stands to reason that parents or legal guardians
                                  > should also notice. If the educational system is to be sued, why not the
                                  > procreational system? I would think deliberate indifference would count
                                  > more at home than strangers at school. That the law would hold the
                                  > teachers responsible and vindicate the parents/legal guardians is
                                  > assinine. But then, the legal system also allows burglars to sue if they
                                  > get hurt in someone's home because they failed to label a poisonous
                                  > substance.
                                  >
                                  > At some point, everyone is accountable.

                                  --
                                  Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                                  Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                                  http://csriu.org
                                  http://cyberbully.org
                                  http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                                  nwillard@...

                                  Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                                  Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                                  Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                                  Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)
                                • Nancy Willard
                                  ... This is a really good thing to look for as evidence, but is not the legal standard. The legal standard is that schools can impose formal discipline if the
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Nov 21, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    > As a New Jersey principal, I have confronted the issue of cyber-bullying on
                                    > a number of occasions. By definition, of course, these incidents tend to
                                    > occur off school grounds. The standard that we typically apply is one that
                                    > "the
                                    > incident would not have occurred were it not for the fact that there was an
                                    > in-school relationship which precipitated the event."
                                    >
                                    This is a really good thing to look for as evidence, but is not the legal
                                    standard. The legal standard is that schools can impose formal discipline if
                                    the speech has caused or a reasonable person would expect that it could
                                    cause a substantial disruption at school. This can occur by creating or
                                    threatening a significant interference with instruction or school
                                    operations, a hostile environment for a student, or violent altercations. It
                                    is exceptionally important to search the school Internet use records to see
                                    if district computers have been used and to ask about school-related
                                    incidents.

                                    > The local police department has taken a similar view and has been
                                    > instrumental in obtaining IP addresses, AOL accounts, and other information
                                    > necessary
                                    > for us to take action.
                                    >
                                    Having a good relationship with local police is very important.

                                    > One of the primary problems that causes this, as I have experienced it, is
                                    > the lack of knowledge on the part of parents of both the bullying party and
                                    > the
                                    > victim. Students' electronic worlds, through cell phone and computer use,
                                    > is typically outside of adult eyes--and, all too unfortunately, beyond adult
                                    > comprehension. The ignorance of parents and families when it comes to SMS
                                    > messaging, voice mail, and instant messaging and e-mail is woeful.
                                    >
                                    Amen. Look at educational documents for parents on my site. But the other
                                    thing we need to do is to really focus on bystander strategies. The parents
                                    are not paying attention. The people who are active in these environments
                                    who we really need to mobilize are the competent, caring teens who see this
                                    happening and can intervene, help the target, or report to an adult. The
                                    bystander strategy is really our best chance.

                                    > That being said, the school does have the legal and moral obligation to act
                                    > to curb the bullying once officials become aware of it. New Jersey courts
                                    > have been VERY clear that schools are accountable and liable for this
                                    > behavior,
                                    > whether it occurs on or off of school grounds. Civil damages and
                                    > administrative punitive actions have been awarded on numerous occasions.
                                    >
                                    Hmm, like I said.

                                    > With all of the issues confronting school officials these days, and the
                                    > significant length of time it takes to adequately investigate these kinds of
                                    > claims--and ESPECIALLY, the lack of knowledge on the part of school
                                    > administrators--such bullying claims tend to be under-reported,
                                    > under-investigated, and
                                    > poorly handled by schools and local law enforcement agencies as well.
                                    >
                                    Hmm, I think I said that also. ;-) We really need ed tech folks to provide
                                    training to school administrators, counselors, and school resource officers
                                    on these environments. And the ed tech folks and librarians need to be part
                                    of the investigation ³team² because they are likely to be better than the
                                    administrators in tracking down the online stuff. And ALL safe school
                                    personnel MUST have the ability and authority to immediately bypass the
                                    filter to evaluate material online.

                                    > The question also arises regarding a child's "right" to privacy when it
                                    > comes to e-mail, social networking, instant messaging and other similar
                                    > online
                                    > behaviors. SHOULD parents install keystroke and/or IM monitoring software
                                    > without their children's knowledge? Is merely talking to children about
                                    > safety
                                    > online sufficient? A small application such as WATCHRIGHT software can give
                                    > parents access to their children's mail and messages. Does the fact that we
                                    > can mean that we should, given experiences such as the one highlighted in
                                    > this
                                    > thread?
                                    >
                                    I think ALL schools should be employing more effective monitoring. But I
                                    have great concerns about the misuse of such technology in the home. It can
                                    really undermine trust - which is the foundation of effective parent/child
                                    relationships. I advise the use of this technology without informing the
                                    child ONLY in instances where a parent is truly afraid that the child has
                                    developed a very unsafe relationship with someone online and that child is
                                    unwilling to talk about it. But the parent really needs to be working with a
                                    social services professional in such a case. The other instance is as a
                                    consequence to demonstrated harmful or irresponsible behavior. But for this
                                    to work, the child must know it has been installed and know what responsible
                                    actions he or she must demonstrate to have it removed or remain in place
                                    only as a precaution.

                                    In the case that generated this thread, the parent was aware of the
                                    communications. The mother was concerned about this online stranger. The
                                    mother did not understand how vulnerable emotionally vulnerable young people
                                    are online and did not realize the degree to which her child was being
                                    manipulated.

                                    It is not an invasion of a child¹s privacy to review their friends and look
                                    at their friend¹s profiles. I have a 14 YO old daughter (I am a very old
                                    mom, for the record). The rule for her is ³only friends and friends of
                                    friends² because I want a real world link to anyone she is communicating
                                    with online. I ask her about the people she is linked to. If I have any
                                    concerns, we look at their profile together because I want her to learn to
                                    evaluate people by their profiles. Once she came to me and asked, ³mom,
                                    what¹s a prude?² I asked her where she had heard the word. She replied that
                                    a someone online (male friend of a friend) just asked her if she was. So I
                                    explained what he was really asking. She responded, ³OK.² Later I asked her
                                    how she had handled the situation. She said that she wrote to him and told
                                    him ³Yes, she was a prude² and then blocked him. No monitoring software
                                    would result in this degree of personal responsibility for her own safety
                                    and well-being.

                                    Happy T-Day. Just spent way too much at the grocery store.

                                    Nancy

                                    --
                                    Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                                    Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                                    http://csriu.org
                                    http://cyberbully.org
                                    http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                                    nwillard@...

                                    Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                                    Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                                    Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                                    Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)




                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Robert D. Sharp
                                    ... ... However, if the IP leads to a public library and the library decides they will not co-operate the police and county prosecutor are powerless.
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Nov 21, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      On Nov 21, 2007, at 11:41 AM, Nancy Willard wrote:

                                      > > As a New Jersey principal, I have confronted the issue of cyber-
                                      > bullying on
                                      <snip>
                                      > > The local police department has taken a similar view and has been
                                      > > instrumental in obtaining IP addresses, AOL accounts, and other
                                      > information
                                      > > necessary
                                      > > for us to take action.
                                      > >
                                      > Having a good relationship with local police is very important.

                                      However, if the IP leads to a public library and the library decides
                                      they will not co-operate the police and county prosecutor are powerless.

                                      > > The question also arises regarding a child's "right" to privacy
                                      > when it
                                      > > comes to e-mail, social networking, instant messaging and other
                                      > similar
                                      > > online
                                      > > behaviors. SHOULD parents install keystroke and/or IM monitoring
                                      > software
                                      > > without their children's knowledge? Is merely talking to children
                                      > about
                                      > > safety
                                      > > online sufficient? A small application such as WATCHRIGHT software
                                      > can give
                                      > > parents access to their children's mail and messages. Does the
                                      > fact that we
                                      > > can mean that we should, given experiences such as the one
                                      > highlighted in
                                      > > this thread?
                                      > >
                                      > I think ALL schools should be employing more effective monitoring.
                                      > But I
                                      > have great concerns about the misuse of such technology in the home.
                                      > It can
                                      > really undermine trust - which is the foundation of effective parent/
                                      > child
                                      > relationships. I advise the use of this technology without informing
                                      > the
                                      > child ONLY in instances where a parent is truly afraid that the
                                      > child has
                                      > developed a very unsafe relationship with someone online and that
                                      > child is
                                      > unwilling to talk about it. But the parent really needs to be
                                      > working with a
                                      > social services professional in such a case. The other instance is
                                      > as a
                                      > consequence to demonstrated harmful or irresponsible behavior. But
                                      > for this
                                      > to work, the child must know it has been installed and know what
                                      > responsible
                                      > actions he or she must demonstrate to have it removed or remain in
                                      > place
                                      > only as a precaution

                                      I don't know about the New Jersey Principal but the districts that I
                                      worked for constantly tell the students that while their work is
                                      theirs, they do not have a right to privacy on the school network. We
                                      told our students that all communications, including any email
                                      (teachers, administrators, etc.) were subject to monitoring.

                                      Bob
                                      --
                                      It has been said before but warrants repeating, "If you think
                                      education is expensive, try ignorance."

                                      Robert D. Sharp, Co-Owner, Sharp Educational Consulting and Marketing.
                                      Teacher, Retired after 34 years, Science, Computers, Mathematics,
                                      Technology
                                      Past Middle School Representative to the NCCE Board
                                      Recipient of The First Annual Learning Space Achievement Awards for
                                      Members
                                    • Art Wolinsky
                                      A while back I told the story of Ditherhead, the picture he posted, and how it took on a life of its own when it came back ten years later and taunt a child in
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Nov 21, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        A while back I told the story of Ditherhead, the picture he posted,
                                        and how it took on a life of its own when it came back ten years
                                        later and taunt a child in a cyberbullying incident. I use it as an
                                        example of why we have to think carefully about what we post online,
                                        but what is happening now dwarfs my feeble example.

                                        The media chose not to publish the name of the mother who created the
                                        MySpace site that lead to the suicide of Megan Meier. It was just a
                                        matter of time before someone dug it up and posted it. The firestorm
                                        that was unleased is beginning to take on characteristics of the
                                        California wild fires.

                                        After reading this article, I am speechless as to what to say.
                                        http://www.wired.com/politics/onlinerights/news/2007/11/vigilante_justice

                                        Art

                                        Art Wolinsky
                                        OEO 3DWriting.com
                                        Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                                        Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                                        awolinsky@...
                                        (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
                                        (609) 618-4433 (Cell)

                                        I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                                        I will surely learn a great deal today.
                                      • Nancy Willard
                                        I agree. I do not know what to say about this incident. But also look here: http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2007/11/blog-readers-ou.html However, I will say
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Nov 22, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          I agree. I do not know what to say about this incident. But also look here:
                                          http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2007/11/blog-readers-ou.html

                                          However, I will say that this is not the first time I have heard of this. In
                                          cases where a student commits suicide in the face of cyberbullying, I have
                                          also heard of online vengeance against the known bullies. This could also
                                          lead to school violence. I would predict more of this kind of behavior after
                                          this incident.

                                          And some school administrators think that if it is off-campus, it is not
                                          their concern.

                                          Nancy


                                          > After reading this article, I am speechless as to what to say.
                                          > http://www.wired.com/politics/onlinerights/news/2007/11/vigilante_justice
                                          >
                                          > Art
                                          >
                                          > Art Wolinsky
                                          > OEO 3DWriting.com
                                          > Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                                          > Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                                          > awolinsky@... <mailto:awolinsky%403dwriting.com>
                                          > (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
                                          > (609) 618-4433 (Cell)
                                          >
                                          > I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                                          > I will surely learn a great deal today.
                                          >
                                          >


                                          --
                                          Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                                          Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                                          http://csriu.org
                                          http://cyberbully.org
                                          http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                                          nwillard@...

                                          Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                                          Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                                          Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                                          Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)




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