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Re: [WWWEDU] e: overview of Pew report on broadband access and online publishing

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  • Robert D. Sharp
    Excellent post, Audrey. My responses below are condensed. Even when teachers see the need for individual sites, the district then sees it optional for the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 4 3:40 PM
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      Excellent post, Audrey. My responses below are condensed.

      Even when teachers see the need for individual sites, the district
      then sees it optional for the teacher. If THEY want teachers to have
      one, OR even require one, then THEY have the RESPONSIBILITY to
      provide the TIME and the SOFTWARE that facilitates the site
      creation. See your #4. I enjoyed hand coding BUT I get tons more
      done with the right software. As far as the right software, don't
      offer me the cheapest software because it is convenient to you, ask
      me what I am familiar with and what I can use to make my job easier.
      There are sites that allow for simple site creation. IF they expect
      me to use it, then don't complain if it does not have on it what they
      would like to see since it does not have the capacity to do it. I
      created our school's 6th grade web page with our curriculum offering
      & time line that match the state standards. Everything you NEED to
      know is found there." I also believe that it is the student's
      responsibility to write down their homework in their planner/agenda/
      notebook so if you have a question regarding homework, check with
      your child. I write it on the board/weekly planner for their benefit.

      I often hear "Why don't you? ... Miss X does." To which I often
      reply, "That's nice, I don't. But if you wish, I will speak to her
      and see that she stops it immediately! It is not a part of our
      curriculum."

      Bob

      On Jun 4, 2006, at 8:01 AM, Audrey Hill wrote:

      > [snip]
      >
      > 1) Teachers didn't see the need for individual sites. [snip]
      >
      > 2) Teachers felt that some content causes problems. [snip]
      >
      > 3) Secondly, there's the problem of comparison across clusters and
      > grades. BIG can of worms! [snip]

      > 4) Teacher websites represent a significant increase in
      > responsibility and time for teachers. [snip]

      > Audrey Hill

      --
      It has been said before but warrants repeating, "If you think
      education is expensive, try ignorance."

      Bob Sharp
      6th Grade Science Teacher
      Past Middle School Representative to the NCCE Board
      Recipient of The First Annual Learning Space Achievement Awards for
      Members
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