Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [WWWEDU] How can a blog hurt? (was Re: School Blogging Policies)

Expand Messages
  • Ja Young
    Hi - Too many of the responses on this blogging subject have brought up suicides and I really hope that everyone will step back a minute and view the issues a
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 5, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi -

      Too many of the responses on this blogging subject have brought up suicides and I really hope that everyone will step back a minute and view the issues a little differently.

      The first suicide I dealt with was a first year law student. That was twenty years ago and blogs and the internet did not exist. I have dealt with students talking about suicide, attempting suicide, and / or committing suicide every year since then.

      The rate of suicides among Asian students was so high at Cornell University that they started a commission to investigate the issue. The reason I got involved in working with the Asian American community on my campus was because of the need to have a counselor for students after two young high school girls committed suicide on the railroad tracks running through campus more than ten years ago. I got a grant three years ago to put on workshops dealing with the issue after a young alumna took her life. That was all before blogs became used by teenagers.

      And although I deal with the Asian American community, where parental pressure is incredible and depression for not meeting their expectations can be overwhelming, that first suicide was a young white woman, and of the people I know who succeeded in their attempt to take their own lives, the majority have been white.

      Bullying, peer pressure, parental pressure, academic pressure, depression from chemical imbalances, depression for a myriad of reasons - can all lead to suicide. What blogs have done in some cases is to take the nastiness of the locker room and the hallway and put it online. But it is still also there in the locker room and the hallway.

      Do you think a child is more depressed from what is on someone's blog than s/he is from that same bully humiliating them in person in front of their peers at school? Bullying is bullying - outing someone is outing someone - giving out personal and private info is a violation of someone's right to privacy - but the issue should be how do we teach students to treat each other with respect - in all situations and using all mediums of communication.

      And you do not do that by banning blogs. When I was in high school (the 60's) a dog earred copy of Lady Chatterly's Lover was passed from student to student. When you are 16, never had sex, and don't understand half of what the book is talking about - it is boring. But we all read it. Why? It was a banned book so of course we all had to read it.


      What has changed more than anything else is not that blogs are causing suicides. What has changed is that because of things like this listserve and the internet, an issue that once never even made it into the local newspaper out of respect for the family's feeling, and was rarely talked about openly to students unless one of their peers took their own life - is now freely discussed by people communicating over the internet.

      But the suicide rate has not gone up. You are just hearing about them now because the internet has made that possible. Blogging, whether done from home or from school, is simply one more thing that teachers and parents need to teach their children how to use properly. In and of themselves blogs are not a cause of suicides.

      More importantly, what you are not talking about is how good blogs and IM's and emails can be in preventing attempted suicides and helping students who at the moment feel overwhelmed and depressed. Blogs can be a means for students to talk about how they are feeling. One of the most important things you learn when someone cries for help is to keep them talking. How many sleepless nights I have had I can no longer count. Just the process of writing and getting their feelings out can also be good for a person.

      Would it be better if they had someone to go to and did not feel the need to do it publicly on a blog? Of course. But sometimes they do not know someone they feel they can go to. Look at it another way. We know that very often people attempt suicide as a cry for help. Isn't a cry for help on a blog better than really attempting it?

      There is also the issue of getting immediate and positive responses - be it by comments to their blog, emails, or IM's - responses and reinforcement from friends who do care. Last semester I was part of an all night IM session among students whose friend was really depressed and it became a viable brainstorming session on how he could resolve some of the issues confronting him.

      You do not protect children and make them safe by taking out of the learning environment those things they will use when they are out of your sight. To do that is simply covering your ----- and the protecting the school from hypothetical liability issues rather than being true educators teaching students about the positives and the negatives of blogging or any other new thing that comes along.

      Take care,
      Ja Young

      I encourage every responsible blogging educator on this list to go NOW to xanga.com and myspace.com and run a search for their local high school or middle school to learn how students are already using blogs. This is the image of blogging that many adults have in some schools. Blogging means bullying or violence and leads to suicide or attempted suicide in some cases. Newspapers are beginning to report on this with greater frequency.

      I know there are educational uses for blogs, but I fight an uphill battle getting those accepted in my building and district due to the digital divide between staff and students. We are one of the largest
      High School only districts in the state, located in a suburb of Chicago. The word "blog" has come to mean only xanga or myspace. The principal subscribes to numerous blogs, so there is administrative support. I post links and articles regarding educational blogging in the staff email conferences. As school webmaster, I have provided blog space for teachers to use with classes. To date, this stigma is unchanged.

      I look forward to reading Mark's list of the GOOD. I used Nancy's list of the BAD as support for why we need to restrict access to xanga.com and myspace.com from our District computers - which to me is an UGLY thing to do. I hate any form of censorship, but child
      safety and school liability have become entangled!

      Diana Clarke
      Academic Technology Coordinator
      Rolling Meadows High School
      Rolling Meadows, IL 60008
      diana.clarke.d214.org
      http://rmhs.d214.org


      On Dec 4, 2005, at 6:51 AM, wwwedu@yahoogroups.com wrote:
      >
      > Date: Sat, 03 Dec 2005 19:38:27 -0000
      > From: "mahlness" <mahlness@...>
      > Subject: How can a blog hurt? (was Re: School Blogging Policies)
      >
      > Nancy,
      > You wrote at such length, and so well, it's taken me a while to get together a response to your excellent list of all the things that can go wrong when young people start blogging.
      >
      > What bothers me is the lack of trust in, or concern about the competence of, those teachers who are out there blogging with their students. Of course we realize it's public and permanent. We blogging teachers are not a bunch of yahoo hotheads, rushing off half-cocked to try the latest gadget the Internet has to offer. We certainly do realize the dangers. The safety of our students is the number one issue, the first thing we think about, when we go online - for
      anything.
      <snip>
      >
      > I will start now putting together a response for the the day when a person asks "What GOOD can a blog do?" It'll be a long response, and many will join in. - Mark
      >
      > Mark Ahlness
      > mahlness@...
      > http://ahlness.com
      > http://roomtwelve.com




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Nancy Willard
      ... I would agree with this, Dave, but add more. When technology started to really come into the schools, I was -- from my perspective -- out in a desert on a
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 5, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        > You could say that xanga and myspace are evidence of the wild world
        > that we have allowed to happen, because we are too frightened to take
        > hold of new technologies and too unwilling to pay for professional
        > development, teacher reflection, risk-taking innovation, and thoughtful
        > harnessing and integration of these technologies into our curriculum.
        >
        > The technologies are here, we've simply turned it over to kids to make
        > of it what they will. What should we expect?

        I would agree with this, Dave, but add more.

        When technology started to really come into the schools, I was -- from my
        perspective -- out in a desert on a soapbox waiving a red flag saying:

        You can't just provide equipment, you have to provide professional and
        curriculum development.

        Filtering software is not going to prevent concerns; it will only create
        false security and make people think that the concerns have been addressed.

        I even wrote a book addressing the comprehensive management of Internet use
        in schools -- that was grounded in the perspective that we need to make sure
        teachers are prepared to make sure that kids are using these technologies
        for really effective educational purposes as the foundation for appropriate
        use of the technologies. My book did not sell. This was right at the time
        districts started hiring techies to run their new E-rate funded networks and
        techies think they know everything about this.

        In how many districts is the person who provides professional development
        around the use of technology still associated with the computer services
        department? This is an indication that the key folks in the district do not
        "get it" that this person needs to be in the curriculum and instruction
        department.

        In how many districts is there a section in the instructional objectives for
        "computer skills" and a failure to address how technology can be integrated
        into instruction as a tool for teaching a wide variety of other subjects?

        In how many districts is there too much "Internet recess" occurring and not
        enough use of technology for instructional purposes?

        Has anyone seen the ISafe curriculum? It is horrible. All grounded in adult
        presented "just say 'no'" type simplistic rules that will not provide the
        necessary insight for kids into how to make safe and responsible choices
        when using these technologies.

        We have to have teachers working with students in blogging activities
        because this is the only way that we are going to have the opportunity to
        communicate important lessons about responsible blogging. But none of the
        groundwork has been laid in many schools to do this correctly and safety.

        In my book, published in 2002, I have a chapter that addresses district
        liability for material posted on or transmitted through the district web
        site. This was before blogging, but all of the same concerns -- basically
        the same ones I listed in my prior email. AND I presented proactive
        solutions to allow these valuable educational activities to occur AND deal
        with the possible concerns.

        I am getting reports of youth suicide associated with cyberbullying, as well
        as school violence. A 11 year old girl in Japan slashed the throat of a 12
        year old classmate, at school, because she was so angry about what the girl
        had posted online. This child died. Here is another story:

        Aptakisic-Tripp Junior High School, Buffalo
        Grove, Illinois
        Friday, May 13, 2005
        Yesterday, two seventh-grader band members were
        arguing over the Internet. At one computer sat a
        12-year-old boy and at the other computer sat a
        12-year-old girl. The young girl apologized to
        the boy for the argument, but he didn't accept
        her apology. In her diary she wrote that she
        wanted to get revenge. Around 8:00 in the
        evening, she e-mailed the boy and asked him to
        meet her tomorrow morning outside the school
        before classes began. She then took a kitchen
        steak knife with a 4- to 5-inch blade from the
        dishwasher, placed it and a poem about revenge in
        a shoebox and wrapped a ribbon around the box, as
        though it was a gift to the boy.

        Today, the young girl arrived at school looking
        for the boy, but he didn't meet her. She began
        to wander around the school and found him working
        on a computer in a French classroom. She asked a
        friend to get him to come out of the classroom so
        that the two could talk. During the talk she was
        going to lead him to a stairway where she was
        going to stab him with the knife. However, the
        boy would not leave the classroom. So, she
        entered the room, pulled the knife from the box
        and buried it (all the way to the handle) into
        the boy's lower back. She fled the room but
        later turned herself in at the school's office.
        The boy was transported to Northwest Community
        Hospital in Arlington Heights where he was
        treated for a collapsed lung. The knife was
        between his third and fourth ribs and he is
        expected to make a full recovery. The school went
        into lockdown and the police were called just
        after 7:30 a.m.

        So please do not tell me I am overreacting to the concerns.


        I have written a book for parents on raising cyber savvy kids and all of the
        publishers have told me there is no market.


        Nancy



        --
        Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
        Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
        http://csriu.org
        nwillard@...
      • Mark Moseley
        I think you re exactly right, David. These technologies are already there and are at the disposal of our students to be used as they please. I followed
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 5, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          I think you're exactly right, David.

          These technologies are already there and are at the disposal of our students
          to be used as they please. I followed Diana's suggestion and looked through
          xanga.com (I was already familiar with myspace). In just one quick search a
          few clicks, I found a young girl in my area with too much personal
          information posted: a home phone number. These students are under the
          impression that they have 100% anonymity online and are protected from the
          thousands of sexual predators who are online, looking for children everyday.

          Many schools don't even require a technology class in order to graduate -
          those that do often times only teach typing and word processing. However,
          our students have already stepped past this point and have launched
          themselves into cyber space, opening up innumerable problems. Therefore, I
          believe that #1 that all students should be required to take a course on
          technology, #2 that this course should be given around the age of 12 when
          many students begin their unsupervised journey into the Internet, and #3
          that this course should focus almost exclusively on Internet safety.
          Furthermore, the instructor of this course should be saavy in the ways in
          which students use the Internet today (since they change quickly).

          In short, it is our responsibility as educators, parents, and adults to
          ensure the safety of our youth, and we should make moves to ensure their
          safety with specific concentrations on what their doing today.

          -Mark Moseley
          Educator


          >From: David Warlick <dwarlick@...>
          >Reply-To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.com
          >To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [WWWEDU] How can a blog hurt? (was Re: School Blogging
          >Policies)
          >Date: Mon, 5 Dec 2005 05:53:27 -0500
          >
          >You could say that xanga and myspace are evidence of the wild world
          >that we have allowed to happen, because we are too frightened to take
          >hold of new technologies and too unwilling to pay for professional
          >development, teacher reflection, risk-taking innovation, and thoughtful
          >harnessing and integration of these technologies into our curriculum.
          >
          >The technologies are here, we've simply turned it over to kids to make
          >of it what they will. What should we expect?
          >
          >-- dave --
          >
          >David F. Warlick
          >The Landmark Project
          >919-571-3292
          >For Teachers: http://landmark-project.com/
          >For Clients & the Curious: http://davidwarlick.com/
          >Blog � http://2cents.davidwarlick.com/
          >Podcast � http://connectlearning.davidwarlick.com/
          >
          >

          _________________________________________________________________
          Don�t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search!
          http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/
        • Nancy Willard
          There is an article on the MySpace generation online at: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_50/b3963001.htm Note the interesting advertising
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 5, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            There is an article on the MySpace generation online at:
            http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_50/b3963001.htm

            Note the interesting advertising connections. This is something kids also
            ought to be taught about.

            I agree with you almost entirely Mark. But in addition to safety you have to
            address responsible use.

            I am working on curriculum that addresses the cyberbullying issues. To do so
            I also address personal privacy and addiction, as well as responsible online
            decision-making. But I do not get into risky sexual behavior, gambling, and
            some of the other dangerous stuff. My target audience is 12 year olds, but I
            am having problems getting some of the concepts down to the level of
            understandability -- or at least I think there are still some issues with
            this.

            I have made two presentations to middle school students using my curriculum.
            Unfortunately, the students did not have an chance to read the written
            materials in advance and I think this will likely be necessary.

            The presentations were back to back presentations at a youth conference. I
            started the first one in sort of lecture mode and figured out really fast
            that this was not going to work. So the rest of this presentation and the
            next presentation I did in discussion mode -- working in little 1 minute
            lectures along the way.

            But I came away from this experience really worried about how I can
            translate what I have prepared into a "curriculum product" that other
            teachers will be able to deliver. I was able to pretty quickly develop
            rapport with these kids (after I dropped lecture mode) because I have a good
            understanding of what they are doing online. Early on in the second
            presentation I asked "so how old were you when you figured out you could lie
            about your age to register on a web site for older users?" They responded
            with squirms, sheepish grins, and confessions of "9" and "11." But I did not
            follow this with a lecture on how dangerous and wrong this was, which I
            think would be the tendency of most adults. It was after this exchange that
            I noted that they really started to open up and talk about more important
            stuff.

            So how the heck am I going to translate this into instructional objectives
            and guidelines for other teachers???

            And where is each school going to find someone capable of delivering this
            kind of curriculum -- who knows what kids are doing online and how to get
            them to make better choices?

            There are also some significant issues about how folks make online decisions
            that teachers will need to understand. This is in my book.

            I am not sure if you folks know the Ribbon of Promise program. This was
            started here in Eugene/Springfield after the Kip Kinkle school shooting. The
            guy who started it is the fire chief, Dennis Murphy. They have a really good
            video BK4K -- By Kids, For Kids: Not My Friends, Not My School that
            addresses the need to report on possible threats of violence. The key to the
            success of this was the inclination of the Ribbon of Promise folks to listen
            to the kids and follow their lead. The video is kids talking to kids. I am
            going to start some collaboration with Dennis Murphy. I am thinking that for
            a lot of schools a video presentation will be important.

            The curriculum is still in draft form. But if anyone wants to review it and
            provide me with some feedback, I would appreciate this.

            Nancy


            > I think you're exactly right, David.
            >
            > These technologies are already there and are at the disposal of our students
            > to be used as they please. I followed Diana's suggestion and looked through
            > xanga.com (I was already familiar with myspace). In just one quick search a
            > few clicks, I found a young girl in my area with too much personal
            > information posted: a home phone number. These students are under the
            > impression that they have 100% anonymity online and are protected from the
            > thousands of sexual predators who are online, looking for children everyday.
            >
            > Many schools don't even require a technology class in order to graduate -
            > those that do often times only teach typing and word processing. However,
            > our students have already stepped past this point and have launched
            > themselves into cyber space, opening up innumerable problems. Therefore, I
            > believe that #1 that all students should be required to take a course on
            > technology, #2 that this course should be given around the age of 12 when
            > many students begin their unsupervised journey into the Internet, and #3
            > that this course should focus almost exclusively on Internet safety.
            > Furthermore, the instructor of this course should be saavy in the ways in
            > which students use the Internet today (since they change quickly).
            >
            > In short, it is our responsibility as educators, parents, and adults to
            > ensure the safety of our youth, and we should make moves to ensure their
            > safety with specific concentrations on what their doing today.
            >
            > -Mark Moseley
            > Educator
            >
            >
            --
            Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
            Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
            http://csriu.org
            nwillard@...
          • mahlness
            ... ... the learning environment those things they will use when they are out of your sight. To do that is simply covering your ----- and the protecting
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 5, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In wwwedu@yahoogroups.com, Ja Young <jmytd@y...> wrote:
              <snip>
              > You do not protect children and make them safe by taking out of
              the learning environment those things they will use when they are
              out of your sight. To do that is simply covering your ----- and the
              protecting the school from hypothetical liability issues rather than
              being true educators teaching students about the positives and the
              negatives of blogging or any other new thing that comes along.
              >
              > Take care,
              > Ja Young

              There have been so many posts and good ideas on this thread, but I
              chose Ja to respond to, because this is the core issue, truly. Also
              sick and tired of seeing "How can a blog hurt?" in the subject line,
              I changed the title in my response here.

              Deep breath. Where do I start? I have so many things to say. Perhaps
              with my personal reaction to this thread. I'm certainly not a person
              who seeks out conflict or goes looking for a good argument, but I
              find myself compelled to write on this - constantly.

              There are three reasons I am speaking out. I strongly believe the
              following to be true:

              1) student blogging is the biggest and best thing to come out of
              using the Internet with kids that I have seen in over a decade of
              teaching and web authoring - easily.
              2) as Ja says, it is clearly our responsibility to teach in and
              about this medium. To not teach appropriate blog use is in fact
              negligence.
              3) I can and am blogging safely with my kids. It is possible. The
              tools are there. Those who don't know that side of the story need to
              get educated before they keep spreading fear and paranoia.

              I am worried. Not about student blogging, but that attempts will be
              made to remove it from the teacher's toolkit. Every uninformed post,
              every fearful magazine or newspaper article, every episode of Law
              and Order with the bad guy as a blogger - is another nail in the
              coffin of this wonderful, innovative, revolutionary tool. - Mark

              Mark Ahlness
              mahlness@...
              http://ahlness.com
              http://roomtwelve.com
            • Robert D. Sharp
              Diana, I do consider myself to be a responsible educator so I took up your challenge and entered my school s zip code into both xanga.com and myspace.com. I
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 5, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                Diana,
                I do consider myself to be a responsible educator so I took up your
                challenge and entered my school's zip code into both xanga.com and
                myspace.com. I looked through the nearly 100 pages of images and
                must admit that I did not recognize any boys or girls listed.

                As I was browsing, I asked myself what I would do if I found one of
                my students listed? Would I contact the parents? Would they be
                receptive? Luckily, as I said, I did not find anyone I knew. As I
                think through the process, if I talked to any of the parents that I
                know about their sons or daughter's listings. I would only suggest
                that they monitor the postings and decide how much they really know.
                Will their child share their password with them? Will they allow
                their parents read the posts they allow their friends to read?

                Thanks for the suggestion. You made me think.

                Bob


                On Dec 4, 2005, at 8:38 AM, Diana Clarke wrote:

                > I encourage every responsible blogging educator on this list to go
                > NOW to xanga.com and myspace.com and run a search for their local
                > high school or middle school to learn how students are already using
                > blogs. This is the image of blogging that many adults have in some
                > schools. Blogging means bullying or violence and leads to suicide or
                > attempted suicide in some cases. Newspapers are beginning to report
                > on this with greater frequency.
                >
                > I know there are educational uses for blogs, but I fight an uphill
                > battle getting those accepted in my building and district due to the
                > digital divide between staff and students. We are one of the largest
                > High School only districts in the state, located in a suburb of
                > Chicago. The word "blog" has come to mean only xanga or myspace. The
                > principal subscribes to numerous blogs, so there is administrative
                > support. I post links and articles regarding educational blogging in
                > the staff email conferences. As school webmaster, I have provided
                > blog space for teachers to use with classes. To date, this stigma is
                > unchanged.
                >
                > I look forward to reading Mark's list of the GOOD. I used Nancy's
                > list of the BAD as support for why we need to restrict access to
                > xanga.com and myspace.com from our District computers - which to me
                > is an UGLY thing to do. I hate any form of censorship, but child
                > safety and school liability have become entangled!
                >
                > Diana Clarke
                > Academic Technology Coordinator
                > Rolling Meadows High School
                > Rolling Meadows, IL 60008
                > diana.clarke.d214.org
                > http://rmhs.d214.org
                >
                >
                > On Dec 4, 2005, at 6:51 AM, wwwedu@yahoogroups.com wrote:
                > >
                > > Date: Sat, 03 Dec 2005 19:38:27 -0000
                > > From: "mahlness" <mahlness@...>
                > > Subject: How can a blog hurt? (was Re: School Blogging Policies)
                > >
                > > Nancy,
                > > You wrote at such length, and so well, it's taken me a while to get
                > > together a response to your excellent list of all the things that
                > can
                > > go wrong when young people start blogging.
                > >
                > > What bothers me is the lack of trust in, or concern about the
                > > competence of, those teachers who are out there blogging with their
                > > students. Of course we realize it's public and permanent. We
                > blogging
                > > teachers are not a bunch of yahoo hotheads, rushing off half-cocked
                > > to try the latest gadget the Internet has to offer. We certainly do
                > > realize the dangers. The safety of our students is the number one
                > > issue, the first thing we think about, when we go online - for
                > > anything.
                > <snip>
                > >
                > > I will start now putting together a response for the the day when a
                > > person asks "What GOOD can a blog do?" It'll be a long response, and
                > > many will join in. - Mark
                > >
                > > Mark Ahlness
                > > mahlness@...
                > > http://ahlness.com
                > > http://roomtwelve.com
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > WWWEDU, The Web and Education Discussion Group
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wwwedu
                > http://www.edwebproject.org/wwwedu.html
                >
                >
                >
                > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                >
                > Visit your group "wwwedu" on the web.
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > wwwedu-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • gordon brune
                I see the life of this thread is dieing down some but I have been inspired by Mark s posting to post my own thoughts on this. Like many teachers, I have
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 7, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                  I see the life of this thread is dieing down some but I have been
                  inspired by Mark's posting to post my own thoughts on this.

                  Like many teachers, I have treaded carefully into the world of
                  student blogging. I have maintained a classroom website for years
                  where I posted student work and solicited feedback via discussion
                  boards. Not until David Warlick's Blogmeister tool come around,
                  though, did I dare step into the blogging waters.

                  First I had my students get permission from their parents to
                  maintain a weblog. I have them sign off on the district's AUP and I
                  also sent home a cover letter with that AUP with a description of
                  what I intend to do. I am careful with the use of pictures. I never
                  post a single photograph of a student that is labeled with his\her
                  name. The photos are usually innocuous groups shots or artistic
                  representations of themselves. (Or the latest set of baby pictures!)
                  And the students know to never use their last name in their postings
                  or comments.

                  But, first and foremost, I use David Warlick's "Blogmeister" tool
                  for the simple reason that everything the students post and any
                  comments that come into the posts first go to my email account for
                  approval and "publication" (or editing).

                  Some blogging software is now adding this level of moderation but
                  David had it from the get go. This simple option in BlogMeister lets
                  me steer clear everything thats "bad" about blogging out there these
                  days.

                  I would NEVER have had my students use blogs without this level of
                  moderation that BlogMeister affords.

                  For example, one experience I had this year was when our class was
                  mentioned in a tech related article. The next day we had a flood of
                  comments come in, all from fellow adult bloggers out there that I
                  did not know. (Take note, that the comments came to my email for
                  approval and\or editing before appearing on the blog.) The comments
                  were quite positive and warm and the users included links to their
                  websites. Two of the adult bloggers took the time to comment to all
                  18 of my studetns individually.

                  I checked out the websites and although there was nothing grossly
                  inappropriate, the links made me feel uncomfortable. I wanted the
                  students to know there was an audience out there for their work but
                  I edited the comments by taking out any reference to the websites
                  before I published the comment.

                  Although BlogMeister is a bit quirky and I know some blogging tools
                  are beginning to take moderation seriously, what keeps me using
                  BlogMeister is the COMMUNITY of users that is sprouting up around
                  it. I have earmarked several good classroom blogs from around the
                  world that provide an audience for my students' work and that I have
                  my class provide an audience for (Mark's class being one). The
                  navigation is essentially the same for my students when they visit
                  these other BlogMeister blogs, the sense of audience has greatly
                  enhanced their products, and, most importantly, it has ensured that
                  there is a safe blogging forum for my students.

                  Gordon Brune
                  5th Grade Teacher
                  Mamaroneck Avenue School
                  Mamaroneck, NY
                  brune@...
                  http://epnweb.org/blogmeister/blog.php?blogger_id=251


                  --- In wwwedu@yahoogroups.com, "mahlness" <mahlness@h...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In wwwedu@yahoogroups.com, Ja Young <jmytd@y...> wrote:
                  > <snip>
                  > > You do not protect children and make them safe by taking out
                  of
                  > the learning environment those things they will use when they are
                  > out of your sight. To do that is simply covering your ----- and
                  the
                  > protecting the school from hypothetical liability issues rather
                  than
                  > being true educators teaching students about the positives and the
                  > negatives of blogging or any other new thing that comes along.
                  > >
                  > > Take care,
                  > > Ja Young
                  >
                  > There have been so many posts and good ideas on this thread, but I
                  > chose Ja to respond to, because this is the core issue, truly.
                  Also
                  > sick and tired of seeing "How can a blog hurt?" in the subject
                  line,
                  > I changed the title in my response here.
                  >
                  > Deep breath. Where do I start? I have so many things to say.
                  Perhaps
                  > with my personal reaction to this thread. I'm certainly not a
                  person
                  > who seeks out conflict or goes looking for a good argument, but I
                  > find myself compelled to write on this - constantly.
                  >
                  > There are three reasons I am speaking out. I strongly believe the
                  > following to be true:
                  >
                  > 1) student blogging is the biggest and best thing to come out of
                  > using the Internet with kids that I have seen in over a decade of
                  > teaching and web authoring - easily.
                  > 2) as Ja says, it is clearly our responsibility to teach in and
                  > about this medium. To not teach appropriate blog use is in fact
                  > negligence.
                  > 3) I can and am blogging safely with my kids. It is possible. The
                  > tools are there. Those who don't know that side of the story need
                  to
                  > get educated before they keep spreading fear and paranoia.
                  >
                  > I am worried. Not about student blogging, but that attempts will
                  be
                  > made to remove it from the teacher's toolkit. Every uninformed
                  post,
                  > every fearful magazine or newspaper article, every episode of Law
                  > and Order with the bad guy as a blogger - is another nail in the
                  > coffin of this wonderful, innovative, revolutionary tool. - Mark
                  >
                  > Mark Ahlness
                  > mahlness@h...
                  > http://ahlness.com
                  > http://roomtwelve.com
                  >
                • Susan Artkras
                  Pardon the interruption: Looking for recommendations for additional listserves, blogs, d-boards, conferences that are similiar to wwwedu and of the same
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 8, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Pardon the interruption:
                    Looking for recommendations for additional listserves, blogs, d-boards,
                    conferences that are similiar to wwwedu and of the same quality of
                    discussion to deepen my understanding of the issues and more importantly
                    the solutions.
                    "Susan Artkras" <artkras.susan@...>
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.