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Re: [WWWEDU] Professors struggle with classroom technologies

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  • BBracey@aol.com
    In a message dated 11/2/2004 1:12:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, sylvia@genyes.org writes: It seems like they are overlooking a great opportunity. If they are
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 2, 2004
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      In a message dated 11/2/2004 1:12:56 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      sylvia@... writes:

      It seems like they are overlooking a great opportunity. If they are running
      these classes for teachers already, why not open them to students too -
      maybe even make it a one-credit class. Then when classroom technology
      doesn't work, a student could help out.

      It certainly would be cheaper than the idea proposed in this article of
      having a support technician sit in every class for the first week, waiting
      for something to go wrong. Not to mention that's logistically impossible
      anyway.
      Interesting...

      the NFIE has that one project that I posted. Sylvia has a good project, and
      there are the models and case studies from George Mason, the Lucas Foundation
      and other places. Teachers do learn in different ways. There are professional
      modules on the Lucas site that can be used and here is that url.
      http://www.glef.org/foundation/courseware.php

      These groups do a great professional job that links the technology with deep
      content.
      National Geographic, NASA, and NCSS. I am sure that there are more. Some of
      the professors are involved in outreach from these groups to the alliances.

      Often in teaching the time for professional development is a problem , as
      well as the methodology of what is considered effective technology use.. Some
      people are still focused on the box and wires.

      Bonnie Bracey
      bbracey @ aol.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • BBracey@aol.com
      To this topic we have had many answers. Here is a view that has not been expressed. The Invisible Success of IT Those of us who have been involved for a while
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 3, 2004
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        To this topic we have had many answers. Here is a view that has not been
        expressed.

        The Invisible Success of IT
        Those of us who have been involved for a while in the long courtship between
        higher education and information technology can recall many ups and downs in
        the last thirty years or so.

        We remember when we first saw Mosaic, Netscape, and the World Wide Web. At
        each step along the way, some of the more impressionable among us thought that
        one innovation or another would push us over the top, that we would have
        finally gained the critical mass that would channel the undeniable power of
        information technology into higher education. We watched as commerce was
        transformed, as entertainment was transformed, as personal communication was
        transformed, and we kept waiting for the moment when higher education would be
        transformed in the same way.

        In particular, we waited for the time when the very heart of education—the
        classroom and the scholarship taught in that classroom—would be transformed.
        Yet despite the tremendous investment that all institutions of higher
        education have made in information technology, despite the number of classrooms wired
        and the number of laptops mandated, the vast majority of classes proceed as
        they have for generations—isolated, even insulated, from the powerful
        technologies we use in the rest of our lives. Moreover, the form in which
        scholarship appears has barely changed. Across almost every field, researchers, no
        matter how sophisticated the technology they use in discovery, translate their
        discoveries into simple word-processed documents. Sure, they sometimes add JPEG
        images and other illustrations; and in the sciences, pre-prints rush around
        the world long before print journals would be able to publish the articles.
        But producing scholarly discourse in HTML and PDF formats has not changed
        scholarship in any significant manner. The nature of argument has remained
        remarkably resistant to innovation in rhetoric or form in every field of scholarly
        endeavor.
        Very real technological accomplishments have tended to become invisible
        because they have been so successful. If you had told people a decade ago that
        card catalogs would virtually disappear within ten years and would be replaced
        by our current information-management systems, they would not have believed
        you.

        Librarians have been the real heroes of the digital revolution in higher
        education. They are the ones who have seen the farthest, done the most,
        accepted the hardest challenges, and demonstrated most clearly the benefits of
        digital information. In the process, they have turned their own field upside down
        and have revolutionized their professional training. It is testimony to their
        success that we take their achievement—and their information-management
        systems—for granted.

        Similarly, college and university IT professionals have done more than
        anyone has asked them to do. The speed with which they have built networks and
        infrastructure, trained people, and created new student-registration and
        fiscal-management systems has been remarkable. And again, their success is taken for
        granted, with IT becoming almost as invisible as the electricity on which it
        runs. In a cruel irony, few faculty think "Ah, I will now use technology"
        whenever they check to see whether a book is in the library, or whether a
        student is enrolled, or whether their paycheck has been posted. And yet many do
        think: "I don’t want to use technology, or I can’t use technology, to teach in
        the classroom or to disseminate my scholarship." Those faculty who have
        ignored all the excitement up to this point have decided that they can withstand
        whatever else is put before them until the end of their careers. They go to
        their professional scholarly meetings and see only a few workshops and talks on
        the new technologies; they read the job ads and see that the jobs require
        exactly the same credentials as were required a quarter century ago.

        The bottom line is that despite all the work and successes of IT
        professionals, teaching and scholarship at leading institutions of higher education
        remain relatively resistant to the possibilities of information technology.

        "The Academic Culture and the IT Culture: Their Effect on
        Teaching and Scholarship"
        by EDWARD L. AYERS
        One damaging effect of the clash between the academic and IT cultures is
        that teaching and scholarship have remained relatively untouched by the
        new information technologies.
        http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERM0462.pdf
        _http://www.educause.edu/er/erm04/erm0462.asp_
        (http://www.educause.edu/er/erm04/erm0462.asp)

        This is from a newsletter. I think it address, the whole article, the topic,
        not in bandaid ways, not in condescending ways, and not from a simple
        solution as the answer.

        Sincerely,

        Bonnie Bracey
        230 G Street SW
        Washington, DC
        _bbracey@..._ (mailto:bbracey@...)





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • McFeggan, Kenneth Mark
        The faculty knew this technology was to be in their classrooms beforehand and don t even take the time to learn it? That is very unprofessional in my opinion
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 3, 2004
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          The faculty knew this technology was to be in their classrooms
          beforehand and don't even take the time to learn it? That is very
          unprofessional in my opinion and with the fees that college students pay
          now, that is unacceptable. Here at the University of Toledo, we address
          that problem in several ways. We have several technicians located in
          strategic zones and one of their major responsibilities is to monitor
          those tech rooms as well as handle calls in a moments notice, with the
          appropriate help numbers posted in plain view on the teacher's station.
          Our tech rooms consists of an LCD projector, computer/network, DVD, VCR,
          mixer-amp-mic and Starboard (which we love). We currently have close to
          40 rooms installed with another 40 to go in by 2008. From the beginning,
          one of our goals was to standardize the technology. In other words, once
          the faculty member has learned the equipment in one tech room, they know
          the technology in every tech room on campus, thereby greatly increasing
          that faculty member's confidence. We have taken this a step further and
          made certain all individual colleges know to call us in for consultation
          with regards to installing technology in their departmental spaces as
          well.
          I feel strongly that faculty should be required to take a brief workshop
          with regards to using this equipment and be "signed off" before ever
          entering a technology classroom. In most cases, individuals can be up to
          speed in roughly a half an hour. If faculty are not going to take the
          time to learn this equipment, much less use it, they should not be
          allowed in the designated "tech rooms" as this is a complete waste of
          resources.

          We do several things to make faculty aware of our workshops. We hand out
          business cards, like salespeople, which is kind of what we are, to
          faculty members before and after class. We try to hit them hard with
          notices in bulk emails, which have to this point, been pretty much
          ineffective. The best response we have had so far is to go to the
          individual college deans and have them schedule their monthly meetings
          in one of the tech rooms. In this way you have mandatory attendance
          (captive audience?) and we bring the training to them. I love to see the
          interest shown once introduced to the possibilities this technology
          provides with regards to supplementing their curriculum.
          Another nice touch we offer is making available our own tech room in our
          department's area allowing easy scheduling of one on one training or
          letting a faculty member practice in solitary comfort while still having
          a technician close by for any questions that arise. Why more faculty are
          not jumping all over this technology, when studies show the obvious
          benefits to their students is beyond me. The good news here is, even
          though there hasn't been a rush on faculty's part to learn this
          technology, the amount of training requested is on the rise and our tech
          rooms are definitely beginning to be utilized correctly.

          I love this message board and appreciate all of the thoughtful views
          expressed here on the many aspects of ed-tech. Thanks for all of the
          insightful input.

          Ken McFeggan
          Academic Support / Classroom Services
          University of Toledo




          -----Original Message-----
          From: Sylvia Martinez - Generation YES [mailto:sylvia@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 12:54 PM
          To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [WWWEDU] Professors struggle with classroom technologies

          It seems like they are overlooking a great opportunity. If they are
          running
          these classes for teachers already, why not open them to students too -
          maybe even make it a one-credit class. Then when classroom technology
          doesn't work, a student could help out.

          It certainly would be cheaper than the idea proposed in this article of
          having a support technician sit in every class for the first week,
          waiting
          for something to go wrong. Not to mention that's logistically impossible
          anyway.

          Sylvia Martinez
          Sylvia at genyes.org


          on 11/2/04 9:24 AM, wwwedu@yahoogroups.com at wwwedu@yahoogroups.com
          wrote:

          > Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2004 00:01:17 EST
          > From: BBracey@...
          > Subject: Professors struggle with classroom technologies
          >
          >
          > Professors struggle with classroom technologies The LSU Reveille,
          > Louisiana State University's student newspaper, reports that many of
          its
          > professors
          > are struggling to use the new technologies being installed in
          classrooms.
          > Students report the teachers waste class time calling in technicians
          for
          > help.
          > Technological workshops are available to faculty, but workshop
          organizers
          > say, not many professors are aware of them.
          > _http://www.lsureveille.com/vnews/display.v/ART/200 _
          >
          (http://www.lsureveille.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2004/10/26/417f4020a989a
          ) ...
          >
          > Bonnie Bracey
          > bbracey at aol.com




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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Krubin723@aol.com
          My middle school is really becoming submerged in technology--the problem is, there aren t enough computers, and I am worried that in a 40-minute lesson, it
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 5, 2004
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            My middle school is really becoming submerged in technology--the problem is,
            there aren't enough computers, and I am worried that in a 40-minute lesson, it
            will take 10 minutes to distribute the computer to each student and start up,
            and 10 minutes to collect, leaving 20 minutes to teach or introduce a task,
            and let students use the computer (possibly taking turns), so they will only
            have about 10 minutes each.

            I see the enormous potential of integrating computers into curriculum but I
            worry about the implementation and the expectation.

            Karen Rubin
            NYC middle school Social Studies teacher


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • mihosking
            Technology for it s own sake has been the fundamental miscue of the education establishment over the last 20 years, and it sounds like your the situtation at
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 5, 2004
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              Technology for it's own sake has been the fundamental miscue of the
              education establishment over the last 20 years, and it sounds like
              your the situtation at your school is an example of a continuation
              of that trend. Schools will frequently grab the technology then try
              to figure out what to do with it, rather than figuring out what they
              want to do and then going for the appropriate technology.

              The way we talk about technology gives away our
              biases...'integrating computers into the curriculum' sounds a whole
              lot like we have a plan, how can we make computers fit into it?
              Rather like saying you want to 'integrate the automobile into the
              horse buggy'...in both cases, the computer and the car, we are
              presented with the opportunity to rethink the whole process.

              Michael Hosking
              Founder, PersonalProfessors.com
              michael@...
              > My middle school is really becoming submerged in technology--the
              problem is,
              > there aren't enough computers, and I am worried that in a 40-
              minute lesson, it
              > will take 10 minutes to distribute the computer to each student
              and start up,
              > and 10 minutes to collect, leaving 20 minutes to teach or
              introduce a task,
              > and let students use the computer (possibly taking turns), so they
              will only
              > have about 10 minutes each.
              >
              > I see the enormous potential of integrating computers into
              curriculum but I
              > worry about the implementation and the expectation.
              >
              > Karen Rubin
              > NYC middle school Social Studies teacher
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jonathon Richter
              Michael, et al in the land of WWWedu - To say that technology for it s own sake has been the fundamental miscue of the education establishment over the last
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 5, 2004
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                Michael, et al in the land of WWWedu -

                To say that "technology for it's own sake has been the fundamental
                miscue of the education establishment over the last 20 years" is quite a
                statement. One could have an easier time, I think, discussing this issue
                on its head: Education has had a very difficult time with change.
                Perhaps this is what you are saying (?).

                Being modeled from the assembly line, having a diffuse constituency
                (kids, parents, state and national govts, community members, etc.), and
                existing as the paramount archetype of "command and control" for most
                everyone in the developed world (that's where we learned it), perhaps it
                is better said that...

                The fundamental miscue of Education in the last 20 years has been to
                attempt to absorb technology into its deeply embedded static
                architecture without making essential structural changes that reflect
                the transformations in the human systems that education is supposed to
                support.

                The pursuits of business, science, and medicine have been undergoing
                cultural changes in the manner of beliefs, values, and assumptions that
                undergird their entire enterprises for those last 20 years: the mental
                models that they operate in are on the run. Even the arts and
                governments are changing to (more or less) meet the demands of the 21st
                Century.

                But Education? - yeah, there are INDIVIDUALS with vision and gumption
                that are operating within education that create change for their
                students and other constituencies, but the system is highly resistant to
                change. Maybe this is what you are getting at: that we're often using
                the OLD MODEL of school and trying to mash new technologies into it's
                Industrial Clockwork.

                Look at the World Wide Web (to keep on topic, Andy :) - the web has
                millions of educationally useful sites "out there" but has education
                transformed to accommodate these wonderful metaphoric devices? No...
                we're still trying to "integrate" them into the larger, assembly-line
                system.

                So, I'm not saying I agree or disagree - just that the issues are
                systemic and need, perhaps, more clarification and discussion.

                Cheers,

                Jonathon

                Jonathon Richter, Ed.D.
                Assistant Professor, Graduate Programs
                Department of Education
                Montana State University - Northern
                Havre, MT 59501

                406.265.3781 richterj@...
                ***************************
                "Art is not a mirror held up to reality,
                but a hammer with which to shape it."
                ~ Bertolt Brecht
                ***************************


                -----Original Message-----
                From: mihosking [mailto:michael@...]
                Sent: Friday, November 05, 2004 2:07 PM
                To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [WWWEDU] Re: Professors struggle with classroom technologies



                Technology for it's own sake has been the fundamental miscue of the
                education establishment over the last 20 years, and it sounds like
                your the situtation at your school is an example of a continuation
                of that trend. Schools will frequently grab the technology then try
                to figure out what to do with it, rather than figuring out what they
                want to do and then going for the appropriate technology.

                The way we talk about technology gives away our
                biases...'integrating computers into the curriculum' sounds a whole
                lot like we have a plan, how can we make computers fit into it?
                Rather like saying you want to 'integrate the automobile into the
                horse buggy'...in both cases, the computer and the car, we are
                presented with the opportunity to rethink the whole process.

                Michael Hosking
                Founder, PersonalProfessors.com
                michael@...
                > My middle school is really becoming submerged in technology--the
                problem is,
                > there aren't enough computers, and I am worried that in a 40-
                minute lesson, it
                > will take 10 minutes to distribute the computer to each student
                and start up,
                > and 10 minutes to collect, leaving 20 minutes to teach or
                introduce a task,
                > and let students use the computer (possibly taking turns), so they
                will only
                > have about 10 minutes each.
                >
                > I see the enormous potential of integrating computers into
                curriculum but I
                > worry about the implementation and the expectation.
                >
                > Karen Rubin
                > NYC middle school Social Studies teacher
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                WWWEDU, The Web and Education Discussion Group
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wwwedu
                http://www.edwebproject.org/wwwedu.html

                Yahoo! Groups Links
              • BBracey@aol.com
                In a message dated 11/5/2004 4:24:48 PM Eastern Standard Time, michael@personalprofessors.com writes: The way we talk about technology gives away our
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 5, 2004
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                  In a message dated 11/5/2004 4:24:48 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                  michael@... writes:

                  The way we talk about technology gives away our
                  biases...'integrating computers into the curriculum' sounds a whole
                  lot like we have a plan, how can we make computers fit into it?
                  Rather like saying you want to 'integrate the automobile into the
                  horse buggy'...in both cases, the computer and the car, we are
                  presented with the opportunity to rethink the whole process.

                  I often think of it as trying to move out of a truck into a moving nascar
                  racing car without stopping. But we did write a paper on which the PT3 Funding
                  was based.

                  An HTML version of Technology and the New Professional Teacher: Preparing
                  for the 21st Century Classroom.

                  http://www.ncate.org/accred/projects/tech/m-technology.htm


                  Improving Technological Literacy Needs National Effort;
                  Potential Benefits Are Many, Report Says

                  Most Americans know little about the world of technology, yet from day to
                  day they must make critical decisions that are technologically based, such as
                  whether to buy genetically engineered foods or transmit personal data over the
                  Internet. Moreover, the use of technology as a learning tool in the
                  classroom is often confused with the broader concept of being technologically
                  literate -- knowing something of the nature and history of technology, as well as
                  having a certain level of skill in using technologies and thinking critically
                  about them.

                  Neither the educational system nor the policy-making apparatus in the United
                  States has recognized the importance of this more comprehensive view of
                  technological literacy, says a new report from the National Academies' National
                  Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. It calls for a
                  broad-based effort to increase the technological literacy of all Americans, a goal
                  that will have many benefits including more informed decision-making by citizens
                  and business and government leaders about the development and use of
                  technology, and a more erudite population that will be better prepared for the
                  demands of today's high-tech work environment.

                  Learning about technology should begin in kindergarten, and the connection
                  between all subjects and technology should be emphasized throughout a
                  student's education, the report says. Technology content should be infused into
                  curricula, teaching materials, and student assessments. At the federal level, the
                  National Science Foundation and U.S. Department of Education should provide
                  incentives for publishers to include technology content in new science,
                  history, social studies, and language arts textbooks. Likewise, technologically
                  focused agencies such as NASA and the National Institutes of Health should
                  support the development of curricula for teachers of all subjects and grades,
                  especially to help make clear the connections between technology, science, and
                  other school subjects.

                  All educators should be better prepared to teach about technology, the
                  report says. Schools need to move beyond the perception of technology as a
                  separate subject to be taught in "shop class." Science teachers in particular need a
                  solid education in technology and engineering, and even history and social
                  studies teachers should be required to know how technology relates to their
                  subjects. Schools should ensure that teachers specializing in technology follow
                  standards issued by the International Technology Education Association.

                  One exception to the general neglect of technology education is the area of
                  computers and information technology. But too often the emphasis is on how
                  information technology, most notably computers and the Internet, can improve
                  the learning process, rather than on the need for students to learn about
                  technology itself, the report says. Furthermore, many schools believe that because
                  they offer computer classes, they are already teaching about technology --
                  an attitude that can impede the drive toward more general technological
                  studies.

                  To spur improvements in the education system, the National Science
                  Foundation, in partnership with industry, should fund an award that recognizes
                  innovative, effective approaches for improving the technological literacy of
                  students or the public. In addition, government and industry leaders should receive
                  training on a regular basis about key technological issues through intensive
                  courses, and engineering societies should institute fellowship programs to
                  create a cadre of policy experts and journalists with a background in
                  engineering.

                  Government decision-making would be enhanced if more opportunities were
                  available for the public to become involved in discussions about technological
                  issues, the report adds. Through creative exhibits and programs, museums and
                  science and technology centers can help the out-of-school public be better
                  prepared to participate in these discussions.

                  This study was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Battelle
                  Memorial Institute. The National Research Council and National Academy of
                  Engineering are private, nonprofit institutions that provide science and
                  technology advice under a congressional charter. The Research Council is the
                  principal operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of
                  Engineering.

                  Read the full text of Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know
                  More About Technology for free on the web. A companion Web site can be viewed
                  at http://www.nae.edu/techlit. Printed copies of the report are available for
                  purchase from the National Academy Press Web site or by calling (202)
                  334-3313 or 1-800-624-6242. Reporters may obtain a pe-publication copy from the
                  Office of News and Public Information (contacts listed above).

                  Then there was the last report that I know of...
                  •Advancing Minority High Achievement (.pdf/376K) Requires Adobe Acrobat
                  Reader (latest version recommended).
                  Calculus and Community (.pdf/162K)
                  Priming the Pump (.pdf/380K)
                  Projected Social Context for Education of Children (.pdf/192K)
                  Reaching the Top (.pdf/228K)

                  http://www.collegeboard.com/about/association/academic/taskforce/taskforce7.html

                  ISTE and CoSN also have papers, booklets , and ways to help,but perhaps we
                  do it one school at a time, or depending on our funding, or philosophy or both.

                  I was helped by George Mason, Chris Dede, then Larry Anderson, and others.
                  Many of us in elementary school never talked to college faculty before. It
                  was the most interesting kind of sharing that happened. George Mason invested
                  time into the local schools with visits back and forth and a project that was
                  quite interesting.

                  Then there was the CILT project. The Center for Innovative Learning
                  Technologies (CILT) was founded in October 1997 with a grant from the National
                  Science Foundation (NSF) to stimulate the development and study of important,
                  technology-enabled solutions to critical problems in K-14 science, mathematics,
                  engineering, and technology (SMET) learning. Four "theme teams" focused the
                  efforts in areas of highest promise. CILT events, often workshops organized by
                  theme, provided a collaborative forum in which people in the learning science
                  community met to assess the progress of the field, define research agendas,
                  and initiate new collaborations. Many of these collaborations form seed grants
                  funded by CILT. In addition to these successful CILT programs, CILT has
                  generated many resources for the learning science community, including tools,
                  publications, and NetCourses.

                  Bonnie Bracey
                  bbracey at aol com
                • Steve Eskow
                  To Jonathon and Michael and all those here who are visionaries and early adopters and unhappy with the rate of change in academia. Some unruly and illformed
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 5, 2004
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                    To Jonathon and Michael and all those here who are visionaries and early adopters and unhappy with the rate of change in academia.

                    Some unruly and illformed thoughts.

                    One thing that never changes is the criticism of the schools and colleges for their failure to change as the critics think they should change. That criticism is a steady, unrelenting and unchanging tune, or an endless drama in which the critics cast themselves as the Visionaries and the academics as the Resisters.

                    Would there be some point in changing the music and the drama?

                    Perhaps one change might be to confess that we're not sure that the telegraph, and the telephone, and the radio, and the television ought to be the stuff around which education is built. Oh yes, and the computer, the latest transformative tool, and whatev3er tool comes next.

                    ***************************************
                    The church and the family and the local pub: have they changed dramatically as the result of the computerization of the world? Should they? Do I really want to type my drink order on a keyboard and have it pop up without human hands or voice involved? Is "efficiency" the only metric in judging the shape and design of a human service?

                    ********************************
                    Has business, to pick one of the usual list, really changed more than education? When I go to the laundry or the dry cleaner or book store or the hardware store or the men's clothing store they seem to me to be essentially unchanged in the nature of the relationship of the people in the store, and the products, and me. Now: the backstage processes of ordering and inventorying and the rest, they have all be changed;--but so have the backstage processes of education.

                    And: there are now virtual high schools, and virtual colleges, and millions of students around the world learning without leaving home, which seems to me as radical a change as anything business is doing. And the institutions offering online instruction at a distance include the storied ones;;in the US the Harvards and the MIT's and the Stanfords.

                    ************************************
                    Might we consider a few changes in our own behavior? Our tone and tune?

                    1. We might be less certain that we know what's best, that we have hold of the truth.

                    2. We might continue the search for new ways of dealing with "resistant" academics. For example: we might consider that much of the resistance is NOT based on lack of experience with the technology or lack of "training" in its use: there are other reasons, and good reasons, for the inertia and resistance.

                    Some late Friday thoughts.

                    Steve Eskow
                    drseskow@...


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                  • Sylvia Martinez - Generation YES
                    Hi all, This discussion (Jonathon, Michael, Robin) stirred a memory of a parable I heard Dr. Seymour Papert talk about at a conference once, about strapping a
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 6, 2004
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                      Hi all,
                      This discussion (Jonathon, Michael, Robin) stirred a memory of a parable I
                      heard Dr. Seymour Papert talk about at a conference once, about strapping a
                      jet engine to a stagecoach, all the absurd outcomes of that and relating it
                      to school adoption of technology.

                      Lo and behold, thanks to the Internet, I typed "jet engine stagecoach" into
                      Google and instantly found a lot of articles. One of them from 1997 (Looking
                      at Technology Through School-Colored Spectacles
                      http://www.papert.org/articles/LookingatTechnologyThroughSchool.html) is as
                      timely and on topic as you could imagine. Plus it contains another
                      applicable image - "school-colored spectacles."

                      The image of these school-colored spectacles describes the way schools see
                      any number of innovations or cultural changes, not just technology. Things
                      that don't fit into the existing model are ignored or altered until they do.
                      So I guess we in the technology area shouldn't feel singled out!

                      Robin's post about laptops being handed out and collected like worksheets is
                      a perfect example. It's so absurd, but totally understandable through
                      school-colored glasses. What can Robin do? Ignore the stupidity (and the
                      laptops)? Have the kids do something trivial (but computerized!) for 20
                      minutes? Somehow, no matter what, the old paradigm has prevailed. Next what
                      will happen is that people will point to this, and say, "see, computers
                      don't work! What we need is to go back to basics!" And sure enough, another
                      decade will slip by with millions of dollars wasted and no change except the
                      rising tide of students convinced that education is irrelevant.

                      I think that's also what is happening when principals like the one Bonnie
                      was talking to at NSBA, have a fantasy Leave-it-to-Beaver image of this
                      country that doesn't exist (and it never did). But it fits the existing
                      school model and makes their jobs easier. It also makes it easier to blame
                      the kids and teachers who don't fit. Bonnie lives in the real world.

                      I think a lot of us struggle with the feeling that we are tinkering with a
                      stagecoach instead of inventing airplanes. I know I do.

                      Optimistically,
                      Sylvia Martinez
                      Generation YES
                      sylvia@...


                      > Date: Fri, 5 Nov 2004 15:01:36 -0700
                      > From: "Jonathon Richter" <richterj@...>
                      > Subject: RE: Re: Professors struggle with classroom technologies
                      >
                      > Michael, et al in the land of WWWedu -
                      >
                      > To say that "technology for it's own sake has been the fundamental
                      > miscue of the education establishment over the last 20 years" is quite a
                      > statement. One could have an easier time, I think, discussing this issue
                      > on its head: Education has had a very difficult time with change.
                      > Perhaps this is what you are saying (?).
                      >
                      > Being modeled from the assembly line, having a diffuse constituency
                      > (kids, parents, state and national govts, community members, etc.), and
                      > existing as the paramount archetype of "command and control" for most
                      > everyone in the developed world (that's where we learned it), perhaps it
                      > is better said that...
                      >
                      > The fundamental miscue of Education in the last 20 years has been to
                      > attempt to absorb technology into its deeply embedded static
                      > architecture without making essential structural changes that reflect
                      > the transformations in the human systems that education is supposed to
                      > support.
                      <snip>
                    • Krubin723@aol.com
                      My point is not that I have not received training in the method they want me to teach—NYC is actually doing a brilliant job of instituting this grant
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 11, 2004
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                        My point is not that I have not received training in the method they want me
                        to teach—NYC is actually doing a brilliant job of instituting this grant
                        program. The teachers are being taught exactly as we are expected to teach and the
                        program is absolutely fabulous. I think the children will get a great benefit
                        from this approach. They will not only learn Social Studies in an interactive
                        way, but will practice skills they will be able to apply across the spectrum
                        of learning and life.

                        My point was that I am not sure how it is going to be implemented in the real
                        world of my school building, since the children do not have technology class
                        (that I know of), and do not have an actual computer lab to visit. I am told
                        that computers can be “ordered” and delivered to the classroom on a cart, and
                        then distributed.

                        But no one has bothered to ask when my class meets, and whether the computers
                        are available during that timeframe, since they are also being used in ESL
                        and other classes.

                        I am really concerned about the timeframe in handing out specific computers,
                        where the children’s work is being stored, getting them booted up and then on
                        the back end, collecting again, and still having enough time to do the
                        research that is expected.

                        Otherwise, the program and the project and the implementation of technology
                        is fabulous and I am a great advocate for this kind of interactive teaching
                        using technology.

                        K. Rubin
                        NYC Middle School Social Studies teacher


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