Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Students on the Internet-? a few well chosen words and resources Reply to Nancy Wilard's post

Expand Messages
  • BBracey@aol.com
    Nancy Willard says. on an Internet discussion on the use of the Internet The information that we need $125 Million to educate young people about Internet
    Message 1 of 18 , Nov 10 2:37 PM
      Nancy Willard says. on an Internet discussion on the use of the Internet

      "The information that we need $125 Million to educate young people about
      "Internet danger" will, in and of itself, generate more fear, which will
      interfere with our ability to infuse schools with web 2.0 technologies.
      There may be differing opinions on the idea of funding as a way to make
      students aware of the Internet."

      Let's have a think about that statement!!

      I think that there are ways to share the positive and negatives uses of
      the Internet using awaremess curriculum and practices of partnership.
      The news always gives us some raw examples.(
      pun intended) The recent saga of Miss California comes to mind.
      http://www.salon.com/news/2009/11/10/us_miss_california

      Projects like Cyberangels come to mind perhaps because girls are often
      the victims. http://cyberangels.org/

      I saw beside Jeffrey's brother as he cried while his mother told his
      story to a group in Washngton. Here is the news report of the story,
      http://www.tampabay.com/news/education/k12/article980638.ece


      "If a child has access to a cell phone or a computer, there's the
      potential for it to happen," said Jan Urbanski, Pinellas' supervisor
      for Safe and Drug Free Schools.

      Cyberbullying starts as early as elementary school, Urbanski said. It
      runs rampant in middle school, and continues to haunt kids through high
      school. While it generally originates from home computers, it almost
      always ends up on campus. But the story from the mother's mouth was not
      one of fear mongering but rather a concern that we raise awareness.

      Free Resources
      There are free resources on line that some may choose to use such
      as this.http://look-both-ways.org/
      That is one way of sharing awareness. It is a quick fix.

      From the Top
      The President of the United States had something to say.


      Asked by one student how he could become President someday, Obama
      issued a warning about Facebook. “I want everybody here to be careful
      about what you post on Facebook, because in the YouTube age whatever
      you do, it will be pulled up again later somewhere in your life. That’s
      number one,” he said, according to Bloomberg.

      \http://mashable.com/2009/09/08/obama-advice-to-kids/

      Bonnie Sutton here.

      My name is Bonnie Bracey Sutton, I am a teacher advocate for the use of
      technology. I was the only K-12 Teacher on the National Information
      Infrastructure Advisory Council, appointed by President Clinton, and
      presided over by Vice President Gore. I worked through the Dept of
      Commerce. It was an appointment, not a job. This work has become a
      passion of mine. I am an original change agent.

      Beyond 2.0 to Supercomputing and then some...

      We have been talking about 21st Century leadership and skills now for
      more than twelve years. Let's do something besides talk. We need to see
      and understand the next wave of teaching and learning and infuse new
      practices into the schools and collaborate with those who have the
      emerging of technology which may be
      beyond 2.0 that is technologies that involve visualization and modeling
      and Supercomputing, serious gaming (we can now talk about gaming!!!)..
      We cantalk about online labs and simulations and share
      new practces.. we have opportunities for teachers and learners in the
      areas of the computational sciences and STEM and yes use the wikis, the
      nings, the communities of practice, the google tools and so on.

      *Many teachers are still just learning ways of informed
      practice because they are constantly being invented.

      History

      "From time to time, someone invents a product or develops a practice
      which has an unforeseen and massive impact on society. The printing
      press, created by Johann Gutenberg approximately five and a half
      centuries ago, was such ,an invention. Who would have predicted that a
      press initially devoted to publishing the Bible and other religious
      texts would someday be seen as one of the forces undermining church
      authority? Who would have imagined that books, then owned by few and
      treasured as symbols of wealth and power, would someday be accessible
      to nearly everyone? And who could have foreseen a system of public
      schools organized primarily for the purpose of teaching children to
      read and to help them absorb the knowledge books contain?

      The results of the printing press, and all of its modern successors,
      are so much a part of our lives it is difficult to imagine an existence
      without the ability to read, and the books, journals, and newspapers
      that support a reading public. It is also difficult to imagine how one
      could organize instruction without textbooks and various associated
      readings. For teachers and students alike, learning at all levels of
      education has been primarily a process of reading what experts have
      written, discussing what has been read, and listening to teachers
      explain or expand upon textbooks. In most cases, schooling has become a
      process for understanding, retaining, and reporting what is found on
      the printed page.

      Transformational Practices

      Inventions of the twentieth century have the potential to influence
      society as much as did the printing press. The computer, video, and
      telecommunications of various kinds are having an impact on every
      aspect of our society: work, leisure, entertainment, household tasks.
      These inventions have also transformed the way we approach knowledge
      and sources of expertise. Today, people are no longer required to read
      about an event; they can see media versions of it unfold before their
      own eyes and make their own interpretation. Consequently, the ability
      to obtain and interpret information quickly and accurately is even more
      important than in the past.


      We need more than web technoogies, 2.0 is just the beginning of the use
      of participatory culture and tools. We are emerging with collaboration
      tools in Supercomputing, in special applications and with handheld
      tools that should have changed education ..It is about community,
      collaboration and the creation of new ways of learning.

      The Future

      Well-paid, rewarding jobs in the U.S. depend on a workforce prepared to
      operate in a fast-paced, technologically sophisticated global economy.
      Doing this in an affordable way for a highly diverse population demands
      new approaches. But progress in improving education and training has
      been slow. Advanced technologies have the potential to make learning
      more productive for students of all ages and all backgrounds and are an
      essential part of meeting the nation's education and training
      challenges. School boards and community groups have differing opinions
      about what should be done. Bottom line, even the Dept of Education has
      concerns about the restrictions that gate use of some of the new
      resources and technology on line ,

      THere are no easy answers.

      I am a Washington Insider but not a lobbyist. I am not funded to talk
      about any of these practices... I get invited to listen to the groups
      who are concerned about the use of the Internet.
      For many it s a no brainer, since they don't have much in the way of
      broadband. Digital citizenship requires skills. I am interested as the
      Digital Equity Chair of ISTE, and the Digital Equity and Social Justice
      Chair of SITE.

      For the coalitions, It was interesting for me to sit in on the
      Cyberbullying.org meeting and to hear the stories of
      young people and mothers of young people, and to be involved with the
      Department of Justice. I understand a nationa; point of view.

      I know Nancy Willard, Parry Aftab, and Bill Belsey well. I sat on the
      first committee thinking about the use of the Internet.
      If we want the students and teachers to be on the Internet, there must
      be some awareness and trainingI realize that there are many degrees of
      fear, and many ways to do
      that. So who decides? Who is the person , or the group?
      Is there one group or person who should be tasked with the
      responsibility or do we take a look at the offerings and make our
      decisions ?I think Marc Prensky has the perspective that I most
      admire.

      Nancy Willard says

      "The educational effort funded by DOJ will likely continue to be very
      fear-based. All of the messages they have funded so far have been and so
      this is very likely to continue. And I do not think the federal
      government should be controlling the creation of curriculum."

      Really? I guess I live too close to the space of government and the
      mall and the hearings to be frightened and I have been at the building
      for meetings on a variety of subjects. I don't fear what they will come
      up with because they work with teachers and organizations and
      interested others.

      If you hear the stories of some of the case based initiatives, it seems
      to me that they are not just about fear but awareness and
      responsibility. Just yesterday, I read of some girls who were being put
      off of a sports team here , for rude pictures that had been circulated
      that were taken during the summer. The debate seemed to revolve around
      privacy issues on CNN, but there was no report on how the girls felt
      about it, what was going on in their community and how people were
      treating them or their needs,and or why the schools chose to eliminate
      them from future sports and other coed activities. But what if what we
      were listening to was a real story, that had consequences, death of a
      child, a la Nancy Grace style.

      I held a mother in my arms who talked about teachers who did not
      understand how the child who was being cyber-bullied felt. She
      recounted the days before the child took her own life. That mother felt
      that if one teacher had understood, if the school had
      not targeted the child, her child might still be alive.

      Do we have ways of educating that tip the balance? In the coalitions
      there seem to be a number of ways to address awareness that are not
      fear mongering. I built a bear in one group. And I took two bears home
      to share with children.

      . First of all, Congress and the people of the US are aware that many
      people at higher risk are not informed, but may be the people who the
      Internet is beamed at , who have little experience and limited access.

      Digital citizenship has components of responsibility.

      I am tasked right now with trying to teach a relative not to put
      his information and ideas as an open book on the Internet in social
      groups.It is hard to do alone and I don't have Nancy in my learning
      community to teach him. I am very frustrated.

      Many people are struggling with ways to involve, have students examine,
      evaluate and educate themselves about on line use. As valuable as
      Nancy's work is, there is a whole world of people needing
      some pointers, a project, a way of looking at the online practices that
      would be helpful. We need a lot more people , groups and educatonal
      groups involved to stem the flow of unsavory practices, and to create a
      stream of awareness, tools, methodologies,
      insight, and case studies ,and / or professional development so that
      teachers, and others tasked with the use of the internet are not
      handicapped by the limitations of what the teacher knows who may not
      have been professionally developed for understanding in any way.


      Nancy further says...in the same post
      "Congress will think that its work is done and so we will not be able to
      establish and fund a multidisciplinary programs - involving justice,
      education and mental health - to effectively address the concerns of
      those young people who are at higher risk online."

      Bonnie thinks that Congress and the Government are asking for input in
      many different ways as never before and that we who teach, and parent
      and are community organizers need to talk to the FCC, respond to the
      Technology Plan at the Dept of
      Education and to make our voice a part of whatever the justice
      department is planning.


      My friend Marc, has a new book that I am reviewing I like the idea of
      partnering for REAL Learning

      Look at the chapters of the book
      is this not the discussion we should be having?
      Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for REAL Learning to be published
      by Corwin March
      1, 2010.
      . The Table of Contents is listed below.
      Not the Dept of Justice, but another way of thinking about the problems

      Table of Contents

      Introduction: Our Changing World: Technology and Global Society
      Chapter 1: Partnering: a Pedagogy for the New Educational Landscape
      Chapter 2: Moving to the Partnership Pedagogy
      Chapter 3: Thinking “People and Passions” rather than “Classes and
      Content”
      Chapter 4: Being REAL (not Just Relevant)
      Chapter 5: Planning: Content to Questions, Questions to Skills
      Chapter 6: Using Technology in Partnering
      Chapter 7: Understanding the “Nouns,” or Tools
      Chapter 8: Letting Your Students Create
      Chapter 9: Continuously Improving through Sharing and Practice
      Chapter 10: Assessment in the Partnering Pedagogy
      Conclusion: The (Not Too Distant) Future of Education

      So using the chapter headings as a way of thinking is a new way of
      thinking transformationally.

      For those who require Cyberbullying as the only topic ,a few ideas

      We who are teachers, parents, mothers and fathers understand that the
      Congress is always evaluating and thinking about
      the problems of the citizens and we are paying attention.


      Nancy says

      "Later this week, Senator Menendez's staff person is presenting at the
      FamilyOnline Safety Institute. I have indicated that if by this point
      in time,
      there are not indications of an interest in changing the legislation to
      address these concerns, I will be asking educators to send messages
      indicating opposition to this legislation. I do not know if this will
      accomplish change. I would lay odds not - it does not seem that my
      message is communicating against those with greater Washington
      connections."

      I think we get a beginning and then we move to make it fit our needs.


      Parry Aftab says lots of things we can use and maybe we need to get
      Nancy on
      the national stage too. What if the DOE had a conference on
      Cyberbullying , a Perspective on Use?

      Parry Aftab's Blog
      http://parryaftab.blogspot.com/


      Wired Moms( It is on Facebook too)
      http://wiredmoms.com/


      Bill Belsey
      www.cyberbullying.org
      "Cyberbullying involves the use of information and communication
      technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behaviour by
      an individual or group, that is intended to harm others."


      I think we have room for many ways of thinking about addressing the
      problems we face.



      Nancy says

      "Later this week, Senator Menendez's staff person is presenting at the
      FamilyOnline Safety Institute. I have indicated that if by this point
      in time,
      there are not indications of an interest in changing the legislation to
      address these concerns, I will be asking educators to send messages
      indicating opposition to this legislation. I do not know if this will
      accomplish change. I would lay odds not - it does not seem that my
      message is communicating against those with greater Washington
      connections."

      I think we get a beginning and then we move to make it fit our needs.I
      think we advise the Senator.


      Parry Aftab says lots of things we can use and maybe we need to get
      Nancy on the national stage too. What if the DOE had a conference on
      Cyberbullying , a Perspective on Use? We could have forums

      Parry Aftab's Blog
      http://parryaftab.blogspot.com/

      About WiredSafety.org
      WiredSafety.org the world's first, and is the largest, Internet safety
      and help group, comprised of thousands of unpaid volunteers. It is
      dedicated to helping families enjoy the new technologies, safely,
      privately, and responsibly. WiredSafety.org's work has increasingly
      focused on children, tweens, and teens. It serves as the umbrella
      organization for Teenangels, WiredKids, and StopCyberbullying, among
      others and is launching the StopCyberbullying Toolkit, a free resource
      of schools.

      Wired Moms( It is on Facebook too)
      http://wiredmoms.com/


      Bill Belsey
      www.cyberbullying.org
      "Cyberbullying involves the use of information and communication
      technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behaviour by
      an individual or group, that is intended to harm others."


      I think we have room for many ways of thinking about addressing the
      problems we face.

      Cyberbullying has been seen in kids as young as seven, with an increase
      in cyberbullying among fourth-graders.

      Teddybears Anyone?

      If teddybears are of interest to you, here's a non governmental
      component of online awareness. It' s a game!!!

      The Build-A-Bear Workshop company-wide Stop Cyberbullying program is
      comprised of several online and in store elements.

      Online:

      Citizens of buildabearville.com can take the WiredSafety Pledge to
      receive a virtual safety sash for their avatars.
      Build-A-Bearville® will feature a meter in Town Square and as citizens
      click the Safety Pledge they will be counted until they fill the meter
      which will allow all citizens of the virtual world to receive a unique
      Stop, Block and Tell move for their avatar.
      Build-A-Bearville is providing online Stop, Block and Tell safety tips
      for kids as well as resources and recommendations for parents.
      In store:

      A map of Build-A-Bearville and the online Safety Pledge will be
      available to all Guests.
      Parental permission may be required to access buildabearville.com.
      Visit buildabearville.com for details.
      To learn more about Parry's charitable work, visit WiredSafety.org .




      Your thoughts?


      Bonnie Bracey Sutton
      230 G Street SW
      Washington DC 20024


      202-484-0554
      202-285-3343
    • Nancy Willard
      I never said that we should not educate students about online risks ­ as well as a whole range of issues around safety, responsibility and literacy. But the
      Message 2 of 18 , Nov 10 3:04 PM
        I never said that we should not educate students about online risks ­ as
        well as a whole range of issues around safety, responsibility and literacy.
        But the ³scare tactics² approach to risk prevention is ineffective ­ and
        that, so far, appears to be all that DOJ has funded.

        I also think that we should not have DOJ funding the development of
        curriculum or the provision of professional development. It is inappropriate
        for the federal government to be funding the creation of curriculum. The
        private sector can take care of this development. And private sector
        companies and organizations that are not inclined to focus on what the DOJ
        perceives to be the ³Internet dangers² should not have to compete with those
        organizations that sees the world the far-based way that DOJ does.

        I also think it is imperative that Congress fund risk prevention and
        intervention initiatives for those young people who are at higher risk
        online. But the current legislation would not accomplish this and thus far
        there appears to be no inclination to change the legislation to do so.

        I have been focusing on issues of Internet safety and youth risk online
        since 1995 ­ and my background is working with at risk youth, law, and
        educational technology in schools. I always have to maintain a balance
        between raising attention to the concerns and not overhyping the concerns.
        If I thought this legislation would be effective, I would be supporting it.

        For the record, Parry Aftab has been working closely with Senator Menendez
        and Rep Wasserman Schultz¹s office on this legislation. There are many
        things that Parry does well. But I disagree with her approaches in a number
        of manners ­ especially her use of suicide cases to gain press coverage
        about Internet dangers. In line with the recommendations from the suicide
        prevention community, I believe that this kind of news coverage can
        encourage teens who are in crisis to think that suicide is an answer. I
        firmly believe that all of the press coverage about Megan Meiers ­ which was
        inaccurate BTW ­ has influenced other youth to commit suicide.

        Nancy


        > Nancy Willard says. on an Internet discussion on the use of the Internet
        >
        > "The information that we need $125 Million to educate young people about
        > "Internet danger" will, in and of itself, generate more fear, which will
        > interfere with our ability to infuse schools with web 2.0 technologies.
        > There may be differing opinions on the idea of funding as a way to make
        > students aware of the Internet."
        >
        > Let's have a think about that statement!!
        >
        > I think that there are ways to share the positive and negatives uses of
        > the Internet using awaremess curriculum and practices of partnership.
        > The news always gives us some raw examples.(
        > pun intended) The recent saga of Miss California comes to mind.
        > http://www.salon.com/news/2009/11/10/us_miss_california
        >
        > Projects like Cyberangels come to mind perhaps because girls are often
        > the victims. http://cyberangels.org/
        >
        > I saw beside Jeffrey's brother as he cried while his mother told his
        > story to a group in Washngton. Here is the news report of the story,
        > http://www.tampabay.com/news/education/k12/article980638.ece
        >
        > "If a child has access to a cell phone or a computer, there's the
        > potential for it to happen," said Jan Urbanski, Pinellas' supervisor
        > for Safe and Drug Free Schools.
        >
        > Cyberbullying starts as early as elementary school, Urbanski said. It
        > runs rampant in middle school, and continues to haunt kids through high
        > school. While it generally originates from home computers, it almost
        > always ends up on campus. But the story from the mother's mouth was not
        > one of fear mongering but rather a concern that we raise awareness.
        >
        > Free Resources
        > There are free resources on line that some may choose to use such
        > as this.http://look-both-ways.org/
        > That is one way of sharing awareness. It is a quick fix.
        >
        > From the Top
        > The President of the United States had something to say.
        >
        > Asked by one student how he could become President someday, Obama
        > issued a warning about Facebook. ³I want everybody here to be careful
        > about what you post on Facebook, because in the YouTube age whatever
        > you do, it will be pulled up again later somewhere in your life. That¹s
        > number one,² he said, according to Bloomberg.
        >
        > \http://mashable.com/2009/09/08/obama-advice-to-kids/
        >
        > Bonnie Sutton here.
        >
        > My name is Bonnie Bracey Sutton, I am a teacher advocate for the use of
        > technology. I was the only K-12 Teacher on the National Information
        > Infrastructure Advisory Council, appointed by President Clinton, and
        > presided over by Vice President Gore. I worked through the Dept of
        > Commerce. It was an appointment, not a job. This work has become a
        > passion of mine. I am an original change agent.
        >
        > Beyond 2.0 to Supercomputing and then some...
        >
        > We have been talking about 21st Century leadership and skills now for
        > more than twelve years. Let's do something besides talk. We need to see
        > and understand the next wave of teaching and learning and infuse new
        > practices into the schools and collaborate with those who have the
        > emerging of technology which may be
        > beyond 2.0 that is technologies that involve visualization and modeling
        > and Supercomputing, serious gaming (we can now talk about gaming!!!)..
        > We cantalk about online labs and simulations and share
        > new practces.. we have opportunities for teachers and learners in the
        > areas of the computational sciences and STEM and yes use the wikis, the
        > nings, the communities of practice, the google tools and so on.
        >
        > *Many teachers are still just learning ways of informed
        > practice because they are constantly being invented.
        >
        > History
        >
        > "From time to time, someone invents a product or develops a practice
        > which has an unforeseen and massive impact on society. The printing
        > press, created by Johann Gutenberg approximately five and a half
        > centuries ago, was such ,an invention. Who would have predicted that a
        > press initially devoted to publishing the Bible and other religious
        > texts would someday be seen as one of the forces undermining church
        > authority? Who would have imagined that books, then owned by few and
        > treasured as symbols of wealth and power, would someday be accessible
        > to nearly everyone? And who could have foreseen a system of public
        > schools organized primarily for the purpose of teaching children to
        > read and to help them absorb the knowledge books contain?
        >
        > The results of the printing press, and all of its modern successors,
        > are so much a part of our lives it is difficult to imagine an existence
        > without the ability to read, and the books, journals, and newspapers
        > that support a reading public. It is also difficult to imagine how one
        > could organize instruction without textbooks and various associated
        > readings. For teachers and students alike, learning at all levels of
        > education has been primarily a process of reading what experts have
        > written, discussing what has been read, and listening to teachers
        > explain or expand upon textbooks. In most cases, schooling has become a
        > process for understanding, retaining, and reporting what is found on
        > the printed page.
        >
        > Transformational Practices
        >
        > Inventions of the twentieth century have the potential to influence
        > society as much as did the printing press. The computer, video, and
        > telecommunications of various kinds are having an impact on every
        > aspect of our society: work, leisure, entertainment, household tasks.
        > These inventions have also transformed the way we approach knowledge
        > and sources of expertise. Today, people are no longer required to read
        > about an event; they can see media versions of it unfold before their
        > own eyes and make their own interpretation. Consequently, the ability
        > to obtain and interpret information quickly and accurately is even more
        > important than in the past.
        >
        > We need more than web technoogies, 2.0 is just the beginning of the use
        > of participatory culture and tools. We are emerging with collaboration
        > tools in Supercomputing, in special applications and with handheld
        > tools that should have changed education ..It is about community,
        > collaboration and the creation of new ways of learning.
        >
        > The Future
        >
        > Well-paid, rewarding jobs in the U.S. depend on a workforce prepared to
        > operate in a fast-paced, technologically sophisticated global economy.
        > Doing this in an affordable way for a highly diverse population demands
        > new approaches. But progress in improving education and training has
        > been slow. Advanced technologies have the potential to make learning
        > more productive for students of all ages and all backgrounds and are an
        > essential part of meeting the nation's education and training
        > challenges. School boards and community groups have differing opinions
        > about what should be done. Bottom line, even the Dept of Education has
        > concerns about the restrictions that gate use of some of the new
        > resources and technology on line ,
        >
        > THere are no easy answers.
        >
        > I am a Washington Insider but not a lobbyist. I am not funded to talk
        > about any of these practices... I get invited to listen to the groups
        > who are concerned about the use of the Internet.
        > For many it s a no brainer, since they don't have much in the way of
        > broadband. Digital citizenship requires skills. I am interested as the
        > Digital Equity Chair of ISTE, and the Digital Equity and Social Justice
        > Chair of SITE.
        >
        > For the coalitions, It was interesting for me to sit in on the
        > Cyberbullying.org meeting and to hear the stories of
        > young people and mothers of young people, and to be involved with the
        > Department of Justice. I understand a nationa; point of view.
        >
        > I know Nancy Willard, Parry Aftab, and Bill Belsey well. I sat on the
        > first committee thinking about the use of the Internet.
        > If we want the students and teachers to be on the Internet, there must
        > be some awareness and trainingI realize that there are many degrees of
        > fear, and many ways to do
        > that. So who decides? Who is the person , or the group?
        > Is there one group or person who should be tasked with the
        > responsibility or do we take a look at the offerings and make our
        > decisions ?I think Marc Prensky has the perspective that I most
        > admire.
        >
        > Nancy Willard says
        >
        > "The educational effort funded by DOJ will likely continue to be very
        > fear-based. All of the messages they have funded so far have been and so
        > this is very likely to continue. And I do not think the federal
        > government should be controlling the creation of curriculum."
        >
        > Really? I guess I live too close to the space of government and the
        > mall and the hearings to be frightened and I have been at the building
        > for meetings on a variety of subjects. I don't fear what they will come
        > up with because they work with teachers and organizations and
        > interested others.
        >
        > If you hear the stories of some of the case based initiatives, it seems
        > to me that they are not just about fear but awareness and
        > responsibility. Just yesterday, I read of some girls who were being put
        > off of a sports team here , for rude pictures that had been circulated
        > that were taken during the summer. The debate seemed to revolve around
        > privacy issues on CNN, but there was no report on how the girls felt
        > about it, what was going on in their community and how people were
        > treating them or their needs,and or why the schools chose to eliminate
        > them from future sports and other coed activities. But what if what we
        > were listening to was a real story, that had consequences, death of a
        > child, a la Nancy Grace style.
        >
        > I held a mother in my arms who talked about teachers who did not
        > understand how the child who was being cyber-bullied felt. She
        > recounted the days before the child took her own life. That mother felt
        > that if one teacher had understood, if the school had
        > not targeted the child, her child might still be alive.
        >
        > Do we have ways of educating that tip the balance? In the coalitions
        > there seem to be a number of ways to address awareness that are not
        > fear mongering. I built a bear in one group. And I took two bears home
        > to share with children.
        >
        > . First of all, Congress and the people of the US are aware that many
        > people at higher risk are not informed, but may be the people who the
        > Internet is beamed at , who have little experience and limited access.
        >
        > Digital citizenship has components of responsibility.
        >
        > I am tasked right now with trying to teach a relative not to put
        > his information and ideas as an open book on the Internet in social
        > groups.It is hard to do alone and I don't have Nancy in my learning
        > community to teach him. I am very frustrated.
        >
        > Many people are struggling with ways to involve, have students examine,
        > evaluate and educate themselves about on line use. As valuable as
        > Nancy's work is, there is a whole world of people needing
        > some pointers, a project, a way of looking at the online practices that
        > would be helpful. We need a lot more people , groups and educatonal
        > groups involved to stem the flow of unsavory practices, and to create a
        > stream of awareness, tools, methodologies,
        > insight, and case studies ,and / or professional development so that
        > teachers, and others tasked with the use of the internet are not
        > handicapped by the limitations of what the teacher knows who may not
        > have been professionally developed for understanding in any way.
        >
        > Nancy further says...in the same post
        > "Congress will think that its work is done and so we will not be able to
        > establish and fund a multidisciplinary programs - involving justice,
        > education and mental health - to effectively address the concerns of
        > those young people who are at higher risk online."
        >
        > Bonnie thinks that Congress and the Government are asking for input in
        > many different ways as never before and that we who teach, and parent
        > and are community organizers need to talk to the FCC, respond to the
        > Technology Plan at the Dept of
        > Education and to make our voice a part of whatever the justice
        > department is planning.
        >
        > My friend Marc, has a new book that I am reviewing I like the idea of
        > partnering for REAL Learning
        >
        > Look at the chapters of the book
        > is this not the discussion we should be having?
        > Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for REAL Learning to be published
        > by Corwin March
        > 1, 2010.
        > . The Table of Contents is listed below.
        > Not the Dept of Justice, but another way of thinking about the problems
        >
        > Table of Contents
        >
        > Introduction: Our Changing World: Technology and Global Society
        > Chapter 1: Partnering: a Pedagogy for the New Educational Landscape
        > Chapter 2: Moving to the Partnership Pedagogy
        > Chapter 3: Thinking ³People and Passions² rather than ³Classes and
        > Content²
        > Chapter 4: Being REAL (not Just Relevant)
        > Chapter 5: Planning: Content to Questions, Questions to Skills
        > Chapter 6: Using Technology in Partnering
        > Chapter 7: Understanding the ³Nouns,² or Tools
        > Chapter 8: Letting Your Students Create
        > Chapter 9: Continuously Improving through Sharing and Practice
        > Chapter 10: Assessment in the Partnering Pedagogy
        > Conclusion: The (Not Too Distant) Future of Education
        >
        > So using the chapter headings as a way of thinking is a new way of
        > thinking transformationally.
        >
        > For those who require Cyberbullying as the only topic ,a few ideas
        >
        > We who are teachers, parents, mothers and fathers understand that the
        > Congress is always evaluating and thinking about
        > the problems of the citizens and we are paying attention.
        >
        > Nancy says
        >
        > "Later this week, Senator Menendez's staff person is presenting at the
        > FamilyOnline Safety Institute. I have indicated that if by this point
        > in time,
        > there are not indications of an interest in changing the legislation to
        > address these concerns, I will be asking educators to send messages
        > indicating opposition to this legislation. I do not know if this will
        > accomplish change. I would lay odds not - it does not seem that my
        > message is communicating against those with greater Washington
        > connections."
        >
        > I think we get a beginning and then we move to make it fit our needs.
        >
        > Parry Aftab says lots of things we can use and maybe we need to get
        > Nancy on
        > the national stage too. What if the DOE had a conference on
        > Cyberbullying , a Perspective on Use?
        >
        > Parry Aftab's Blog
        > http://parryaftab.blogspot.com/
        >
        > Wired Moms( It is on Facebook too)
        > http://wiredmoms.com/
        >
        > Bill Belsey
        > www.cyberbullying.org
        > "Cyberbullying involves the use of information and communication
        > technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behaviour by
        > an individual or group, that is intended to harm others."
        >
        > I think we have room for many ways of thinking about addressing the
        > problems we face.
        >
        > Nancy says
        >
        > "Later this week, Senator Menendez's staff person is presenting at the
        > FamilyOnline Safety Institute. I have indicated that if by this point
        > in time,
        > there are not indications of an interest in changing the legislation to
        > address these concerns, I will be asking educators to send messages
        > indicating opposition to this legislation. I do not know if this will
        > accomplish change. I would lay odds not - it does not seem that my
        > message is communicating against those with greater Washington
        > connections."
        >
        > I think we get a beginning and then we move to make it fit our needs.I
        > think we advise the Senator.
        >
        > Parry Aftab says lots of things we can use and maybe we need to get
        > Nancy on the national stage too. What if the DOE had a conference on
        > Cyberbullying , a Perspective on Use? We could have forums
        >
        > Parry Aftab's Blog
        > http://parryaftab.blogspot.com/
        >
        > About WiredSafety.org
        > WiredSafety.org the world's first, and is the largest, Internet safety
        > and help group, comprised of thousands of unpaid volunteers. It is
        > dedicated to helping families enjoy the new technologies, safely,
        > privately, and responsibly. WiredSafety.org's work has increasingly
        > focused on children, tweens, and teens. It serves as the umbrella
        > organization for Teenangels, WiredKids, and StopCyberbullying, among
        > others and is launching the StopCyberbullying Toolkit, a free resource
        > of schools.
        >
        > Wired Moms( It is on Facebook too)
        > http://wiredmoms.com/
        >
        > Bill Belsey
        > www.cyberbullying.org
        > "Cyberbullying involves the use of information and communication
        > technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behaviour by
        > an individual or group, that is intended to harm others."
        >
        > I think we have room for many ways of thinking about addressing the
        > problems we face.
        >
        > Cyberbullying has been seen in kids as young as seven, with an increase
        > in cyberbullying among fourth-graders.
        >
        > Teddybears Anyone?
        >
        > If teddybears are of interest to you, here's a non governmental
        > component of online awareness. It' s a game!!!
        >
        > The Build-A-Bear Workshop company-wide Stop Cyberbullying program is
        > comprised of several online and in store elements.
        >
        > Online:
        >
        > Citizens of buildabearville.com can take the WiredSafety Pledge to
        > receive a virtual safety sash for their avatars.
        > Build-A-Bearville® will feature a meter in Town Square and as citizens
        > click the Safety Pledge they will be counted until they fill the meter
        > which will allow all citizens of the virtual world to receive a unique
        > Stop, Block and Tell move for their avatar.
        > Build-A-Bearville is providing online Stop, Block and Tell safety tips
        > for kids as well as resources and recommendations for parents.
        > In store:
        >
        > A map of Build-A-Bearville and the online Safety Pledge will be
        > available to all Guests.
        > Parental permission may be required to access buildabearville.com.
        > Visit buildabearville.com for details.
        > To learn more about Parry's charitable work, visit WiredSafety.org .
        >
        > Your thoughts?
        >
        > Bonnie Bracey Sutton
        > 230 G Street SW
        > Washington DC 20024
        >
        > 202-484-0554
        > 202-285-3343
        >
        >
        >


        --
        Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
        Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
        http://csriu.org
        http://cyberbully.org
        http://cyber-safe-kids.com
        http://csriu.wordpress.com
        nwillard@...

        Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
        Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

        Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
        Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Art Wolinsky
        Two weeks ago I moved from NH to NH. Since then, my copying and pasting has been replaced by hammering and sawing. I m just beginning to get my nostrils
        Message 3 of 18 , Nov 11 10:25 AM
          Two weeks ago I moved from NH to NH. Since then, my copying and
          pasting has been replaced by hammering and sawing. I'm just
          beginning to get my nostrils about the saw dust. I've been reading
          the thread, but haven't had the time to respond, but at the risk of
          gobbling up any time I might have, I'll post some comments now.

          CIPA

          Has anyone heard of anyone losing funding because they didn't comply
          with CIPA (other than those who opted not to comply)? Has anyone
          heard of any government agency even inquiring about CIPA compliance
          in a school district (other than original certification)? That being
          said, on paper, I would say that the vast majority of schools are
          over complying, especially when it comes to filtering. However, they
          under complying in many other areas, because the safety plans and
          education that they put down on paper exist mainly on paper and the
          reality looks nothing like the form they filed. The fact is, and I
          suspect most administrators know it, that if you file the correct
          forms, you have a better chance of winning the lottery that being
          questioned by the government.

          Megan Meiers Case

          I think just about everyone will agree that the Megan Meiers case was
          atypical and not cyberbullying as one would define it. The press
          loved it, but without it would we have the awareness of the problem
          we do today? I doubt it.

          Nancy, Parry, myself and MANY others have been trying to raise the
          awareness of cyberbullying since the mid-90's. Heck, I had my
          daughter moderating a board on my BBS in the 80's and dealing with it
          then. In reality, we were all whistling into the wind until that
          case hit the media. Suddenly the wind changed and we and a whole new
          crop of "experts" had a platform.

          Did it influence youth to commit suicide, I can't say one way or
          another, but I choose to believe that if it did, there were more
          youth who were influenced the other way, but I'm not here to write
          about Megan.

          Fear Based Approach

          A fear based approach is not likely to work, but we have to be
          careful about what we characterize as fear based. Stories of serious
          harm because of careless online habits or bullying can be very
          effective if done properly and combined with other approaches such as
          peer to peer or teen to adult education. These stories need to be
          told in the right context.

          Let's talk about Jeffrey
          Johnston. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye17IH5Hb0M Almost two
          years ago, over two days, I spent a good deal of time with Jeffrey's
          mother (and Tina Meiers). I became familiar with both cases in some
          detail. Where Megan's case was atypical to the extreme, Jeffrey's
          case was classic and is a story that should be heard in it's
          entirety, far and wide in considerably more detail than this
          video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye17IH5Hb0M or media sound
          bites (more about sound bites later).

          Yes, Jeffrey committed suicide, and he was driven to it by
          cyberbullying, but a lot of people failed to act properly to do
          anything about it. That is the message that has to get out. Would
          Jeffrey's Law have passed in Florida if Megan's story had not been
          front and center? I doubt it.

          The venue where I met Debbie Johnston was a two day Cyberbullying
          Summit held at Pace University. During the two days, the audience
          heard from Debbie Johnston, Tina Meiers, panels of experts including
          me, other educators industry, policy makers, law enforcement, and
          most importantly dozens of teens and tweens, many of whom were cyberbullied.

          Debbie Johnston and Tina Meiers told powerful stories, but the ones
          that made the most impact were the stories of teens who had weathered
          the storm. All of these stories spanned the spectrum from trivial to
          tragic. The tragic was put in perspective by a balanced
          approach. It detailed all of these shortcomings and underscored the
          need for proper training and appropriate responses. It is not scare
          tactics to detail what happened, the interventions that failed, the
          failure of schools, peers, and agencies to act intelligently and efficiently.

          Internet Safety and Technology Task Force

          Everything is connected. Would the Internet Safety and Technology
          Task Force have been established if it wasn't for the Megan and other
          Facebook coverage? Perhaps, but not as quickly. Having
          participated, I can say with confidence that this group took a
          realistic look at online safety and age verification. It debunked
          the hype being put out by the media, but that didn't phase the
          media. Headlines shouted that the Internet is not as dangerous as it
          has been made to look and many of the AG's were angry at the report,
          because they interpreted it as understating the dangers.

          It's sad that so many missed the real message here. The predator
          danger is real, but most kids are safe and want to be safe. However,
          they identified a small group of teens who are at real risk and
          suggested ways to deal with that identified group, rather than a
          blanket approach that spreads a message the majority already
          acknowledges it, but does little to help those who are at risk. They
          suggested more training for social network personnel on how to spot
          and deal with those at risk. The suggested more community
          intervention and other things that largely got lost in the reporting.

          Menendez Legislation

          http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2009/05/13/20090513sexting13-ON.html

          Parry Aftab is based in NJ and has been dealing with Internet safety
          since the early 90's. Menendez is a NJ Senator. Is it surprising
          that she worked with his office? I contend that it would be
          unconscionable if she didn't.

          Working with Parry, I know the message and information that was
          presented, and it wasn't fear based. Is the legislation perfect? Of
          course not. Is it a good start? I think so. The fact is, the
          legislation that you or I might want to see wouldn't have a
          snowball's chance in hell to pass. You have to do what you can and
          make compromises along the way. It takes a special kind of person to
          be able to do that. I sure can't and it's one reason I avoid the
          Beltway whenever I can.

          Sound Bites

          Over the years, I've had the opportunity to be in front of reporters
          and TV cameras many times. I'm fortunate that editing has never made
          it look like I was saying one thing when I meant another. However,
          the larger the viewing audience, the less likely it was that my full
          message or even the substance of my message would make it to the
          air. It's one reason, I don't do that anymore.

          OK, I hear a 2" x 4" and my table saw calling...

          Art

          Art Wolinsky
          OEO 3DWriting.com
          Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
          Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
          awolinsky@...
          (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
          (609) 618-4433 (Cell)

          I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
          I will surely learn a great deal today.
        • Nancy Willard
          The FCC regulations on CIPA indicated that the FCC would rarely, if ever, investigate a district on this issue. And they referenced their inclination to trust
          Message 4 of 18 , Nov 11 11:03 AM
            The FCC regulations on CIPA indicated that the FCC would rarely, if ever,
            investigate a district on this issue. And they referenced their inclination
            to trust the good faith of the district many times.

            The Megan Meiers case was misreported. But the underlying incident actually
            resembled typical cyberbullying. The fake profile was set up by two teens in
            retaliation for Megan¹s bullying of Sara Drew. And it was going to be used
            to cause harm ­ you easily could predict that they were either going to turn
            on Megan (as they did) or go public with Megan¹s comments to this fake boy
            and humiliate her. But given the events ­ an online fight lasting an
            afternoon at best ­ it is highly likely that this profile was not the
            ³cause² of Megan¹s suicide. Jeffery¹s case was more closely related to the
            ongoing bullying and cyberbullying he was receiving. Young people who are
            bullied and cyberbullied are committing suicide. We MUST address this issue.
            Where I part ways with Parry is using these grieving parents to obtain press
            coverage ­ and to promote legislation. Because unless this information is
            presented very carefully, it can CAUSE other teens to decide that suicide is
            an appropriate response.

            So you think the Megan Meiers story was good because it led to the creation
            of an Internet safety task force. I think it was exceptionally BAD because
            it VERY LIKELY led other young people to commit suicide!!!!!

            Unfortunately, the NTIA working group on Internet safety does not include
            anyone, other than the chair of the education subcommittee, who has a
            professional background in education. But this chair, Larry Magid, is
            really, really good. And the co-chairs of the overall committee, Anne
            Collier and Hemu Nigam are also really, really good. Anne, especially, is
            also very attentive to the educational issues. So I think this report will
            be good.

            The Menendez/Wasserman Schultz legislation, as currently drafted, will not
            fund the kinds of initiatives that will effectively address the very
            legitimate concerns of the young people who are at higher risk online. And
            there is GREAT danger that this legislation will fund more creation of the
            kinds of educational approaches that are doing more harm than good.

            Gee, maybe I need to move to New Jersey to get Sen Menendez¹s staff to
            listen to me.

            Nancy
            >
            > Two weeks ago I moved from NH to NH. Since then, my copying and
            > pasting has been replaced by hammering and sawing. I'm just
            > beginning to get my nostrils about the saw dust. I've been reading
            > the thread, but haven't had the time to respond, but at the risk of
            > gobbling up any time I might have, I'll post some comments now.
            >
            > CIPA
            >
            > Has anyone heard of anyone losing funding because they didn't comply
            > with CIPA (other than those who opted not to comply)? Has anyone
            > heard of any government agency even inquiring about CIPA compliance
            > in a school district (other than original certification)? That being
            > said, on paper, I would say that the vast majority of schools are
            > over complying, especially when it comes to filtering. However, they
            > under complying in many other areas, because the safety plans and
            > education that they put down on paper exist mainly on paper and the
            > reality looks nothing like the form they filed. The fact is, and I
            > suspect most administrators know it, that if you file the correct
            > forms, you have a better chance of winning the lottery that being
            > questioned by the government.
            >
            > Megan Meiers Case
            >
            > I think just about everyone will agree that the Megan Meiers case was
            > atypical and not cyberbullying as one would define it. The press
            > loved it, but without it would we have the awareness of the problem
            > we do today? I doubt it.
            >
            > Nancy, Parry, myself and MANY others have been trying to raise the
            > awareness of cyberbullying since the mid-90's. Heck, I had my
            > daughter moderating a board on my BBS in the 80's and dealing with it
            > then. In reality, we were all whistling into the wind until that
            > case hit the media. Suddenly the wind changed and we and a whole new
            > crop of "experts" had a platform.
            >
            > Did it influence youth to commit suicide, I can't say one way or
            > another, but I choose to believe that if it did, there were more
            > youth who were influenced the other way, but I'm not here to write
            > about Megan.
            >
            > Fear Based Approach
            >
            > A fear based approach is not likely to work, but we have to be
            > careful about what we characterize as fear based. Stories of serious
            > harm because of careless online habits or bullying can be very
            > effective if done properly and combined with other approaches such as
            > peer to peer or teen to adult education. These stories need to be
            > told in the right context.
            >
            > Let's talk about Jeffrey
            > Johnston. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye17IH5Hb0M Almost two
            > years ago, over two days, I spent a good deal of time with Jeffrey's
            > mother (and Tina Meiers). I became familiar with both cases in some
            > detail. Where Megan's case was atypical to the extreme, Jeffrey's
            > case was classic and is a story that should be heard in it's
            > entirety, far and wide in considerably more detail than this
            > video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye17IH5Hb0M or media sound
            > bites (more about sound bites later).
            >
            > Yes, Jeffrey committed suicide, and he was driven to it by
            > cyberbullying, but a lot of people failed to act properly to do
            > anything about it. That is the message that has to get out. Would
            > Jeffrey's Law have passed in Florida if Megan's story had not been
            > front and center? I doubt it.
            >
            > The venue where I met Debbie Johnston was a two day Cyberbullying
            > Summit held at Pace University. During the two days, the audience
            > heard from Debbie Johnston, Tina Meiers, panels of experts including
            > me, other educators industry, policy makers, law enforcement, and
            > most importantly dozens of teens and tweens, many of whom were cyberbullied.
            >
            > Debbie Johnston and Tina Meiers told powerful stories, but the ones
            > that made the most impact were the stories of teens who had weathered
            > the storm. All of these stories spanned the spectrum from trivial to
            > tragic. The tragic was put in perspective by a balanced
            > approach. It detailed all of these shortcomings and underscored the
            > need for proper training and appropriate responses. It is not scare
            > tactics to detail what happened, the interventions that failed, the
            > failure of schools, peers, and agencies to act intelligently and efficiently.
            >
            > Internet Safety and Technology Task Force
            >
            > Everything is connected. Would the Internet Safety and Technology
            > Task Force have been established if it wasn't for the Megan and other
            > Facebook coverage? Perhaps, but not as quickly. Having
            > participated, I can say with confidence that this group took a
            > realistic look at online safety and age verification. It debunked
            > the hype being put out by the media, but that didn't phase the
            > media. Headlines shouted that the Internet is not as dangerous as it
            > has been made to look and many of the AG's were angry at the report,
            > because they interpreted it as understating the dangers.
            >
            > It's sad that so many missed the real message here. The predator
            > danger is real, but most kids are safe and want to be safe. However,
            > they identified a small group of teens who are at real risk and
            > suggested ways to deal with that identified group, rather than a
            > blanket approach that spreads a message the majority already
            > acknowledges it, but does little to help those who are at risk. They
            > suggested more training for social network personnel on how to spot
            > and deal with those at risk. The suggested more community
            > intervention and other things that largely got lost in the reporting.
            >
            > Menendez Legislation
            >
            > http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2009/05/13/20090513sexting13-ON.html
            >
            > Parry Aftab is based in NJ and has been dealing with Internet safety
            > since the early 90's. Menendez is a NJ Senator. Is it surprising
            > that she worked with his office? I contend that it would be
            > unconscionable if she didn't.
            >
            > Working with Parry, I know the message and information that was
            > presented, and it wasn't fear based. Is the legislation perfect? Of
            > course not. Is it a good start? I think so. The fact is, the
            > legislation that you or I might want to see wouldn't have a
            > snowball's chance in hell to pass. You have to do what you can and
            > make compromises along the way. It takes a special kind of person to
            > be able to do that. I sure can't and it's one reason I avoid the
            > Beltway whenever I can.
            >
            > Sound Bites
            >
            > Over the years, I've had the opportunity to be in front of reporters
            > and TV cameras many times. I'm fortunate that editing has never made
            > it look like I was saying one thing when I meant another. However,
            > the larger the viewing audience, the less likely it was that my full
            > message or even the substance of my message would make it to the
            > air. It's one reason, I don't do that anymore.
            >
            > OK, I hear a 2" x 4" and my table saw calling...
            >
            > Art
            >
            > Art Wolinsky
            > OEO 3DWriting.com
            > Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
            > Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
            > awolinsky@... <mailto:awolinsky%403dwriting.com>
            > (609) 698-8223 (Home Office)
            > (609) 618-4433 (Cell)
            >
            > I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
            > I will surely learn a great deal today.
            >
            >
            >


            --
            Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
            Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
            http://csriu.org
            http://cyberbully.org
            http://cyber-safe-kids.com
            http://csriu.wordpress.com
            nwillard@...

            Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
            Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

            Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
            Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • BBracey@aol.com
            The Working Group reports to the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information and Congress. Within a year of convening its first meeting,
            Message 5 of 18 , Nov 11 11:14 AM
              The Working Group reports to the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for
              Communications and Information and Congress. Within a year of convening
              its first meeting, the group will submit a report of its findings and
              make recommendations on how to increase online safety measures.

              Hemanshu Nigam and Anne Collier will act as Co-Chairs of the Group.

              Private sector members of the working group include:

              Ms. Parry Aftab, WiredSafety
              Ms. Elizabeth Banker, Yahoo! Inc.
              Mr. Christopher Bubb, AOL
              Ms. Anne Collier, Net Family News, Inc./ConnectSafely.org
              Mr. Bradon Cox, NetChoice Coalition
              Ms. Caroline Curtin, Microsoft
              Mr. Brian Cute, Afilias U.S.A.
              Mr. Jeremy Geigle, Arizona Family Council
              Ms. Marsali Hancock, Internet Keep Safe Coalition
              Mr. Michael Kaiser, National Cyber Security Alliance
              Mr. Christopher Kelly, Facebook
              Ms. Hedda Litwin, Cyberspace Law Counsel of the National Association of
              Attorneys General
              Mr. Brian Knapp, Loopt, Inc.
              Mr. Timothy Lordan, Internet Education Foundation
              Mr. Larry Magid, SafeKids.com/ConnectSafely.org
              Mr. Brian Markwalter, Consumer Electronics Association
              Mr. Michael McKeehan, Verizon Communications, Inc.
              Dr. Samuel McQuade, III, Rochester Institute of Technology
              Ms. Orit Michiel, Motion Picture Association of America, Inc.
              Mr. John Morris, Center for Democracy & Technology
              Mr. Jonathon Nevett, Network Solutions, LLC
              Mr. Hemanshu Nigam, News Corporation | MySpace
              Ms. Jill Nissen, Ning, Inc.
              Mr. Jay Opperman, Comcast Corporation
              Mr. Kevin Rupy, United States Telecom Association
              Mr. John Shehan, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
              Mr. K. Dane Snowden, CTIA - the Wireless Association
              Mr. Adam Thierer, Progress & Freedom Foundation
              Ms. Patricia Vance, Entertainment Software Rating Board
              Mr. Ralph Yarro, The CP80 Foundation
              Federal Government Participants of the Working Group Include:

              Robert Cannon, Federal Communications Commission
              Cheryl Petty Garnett, U.S. Department of Education
              Monique Perez Roth, U.S. Department of Justice
              Nat Wood, Federal Trade Commission

              -
            • kbtigger13@hotmail.com
              ... Date: Wednesday, November 11, 2009 12:25:53 pm To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.com From: Art Wolinsky Subject: [WWWEDU] Random thoughts on
              Message 6 of 18 , Nov 11 11:32 AM
                -----Original Message-----
                Date: Wednesday, November 11, 2009 12:25:53 pm
                To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.com
                From: Art Wolinsky <awolinsky@...>
                Subject: [WWWEDU] Random thoughts on Internet Safety


                Two weeks ago I moved from NH to NH. Since then, my copying and
                pasting has been replaced by hammering and sawing. I'm just
                beginning to get my nostrils about the saw dust. I've been reading
                the thread, but haven't had the time to respond, but at the risk of
                gobbling up any time I might have, I'll post some comments now.

                CIPA

                Has anyone heard of anyone losing funding because they didn't comply
                with CIPA (other than those who opted not to comply)? Has anyone
                heard of any government agency even inquiring about CIPA compliance
                in a school district (other than original certification)? That being
                said, on paper, I would say that the vast majority of schools are
                over complying, especially when it comes to filtering. However, they
                under complying in many other areas, because the safety plans and
                education that they put down on paper exist mainly on paper and the
                reality looks nothing like the form they filed. The fact is, and I
                suspect most administrators know it, that if you file the correct
                f
              • kbtigger13@hotmail.com
                ... Date: Wednesday, November 11, 2009 12:25:53 pm To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.com From: Art Wolinsky Subject: [WWWEDU] Random thoughts on
                Message 7 of 18 , Nov 11 11:37 AM
                  -----Original Message-----
                  Date: Wednesday, November 11, 2009 12:25:53 pm
                  To: wwwedu@yahoogroups.com
                  From: Art Wolinsky <awolinsky@...>
                  Subject: [WWWEDU] Random thoughts on Internet Safety


                  Two weeks ago I moved from NH to NH. Since then, my copying and
                  pasting has been replaced by hammering and sawing. I'm just
                  beginning to get my nostrils about the saw dust. I've been reading
                  the thread, but haven't had the time to respond, but at the risk of
                  gobbling up any time I might have, I'll post some comments now.

                  CIPA

                  Has anyone heard of anyone losing funding because they didn't comply
                  with CIPA (other than those who opted not to comply)? Has anyone
                  heard of any government agency even inquiring about CIPA compliance
                  in a school district (other than original certification)? That being
                  said, on paper, I would say that the vast majority of schools are
                  over complying, especially when it comes to filtering. However, they
                  under complying in many other areas, because the safety plans and
                  education that they put down on paper exist mainly on paper and the
                  reality looks nothing like the form they filed. The fact is, and I
                  suspect most administrators know it, that if you file the correct
                  f
                • BBracey@aol.com
                  Background The Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) is a federal law enacted by Congress to address concerns about access to offensive content over the
                  Message 8 of 18 , Nov 11 12:01 PM
                    Background

                    The Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) is a federal law enacted
                    by Congress to address concerns about access to offensive content over
                    the Internet on school and library computers. CIPA imposes certain
                    types of requirements on any school or library that receives funding
                    for Internet access or internal connections from the E-rate program – a
                    program that makes certain communications technology more affordable
                    for eligible schools and libraries. In early 2001, the FCC issued rules
                    implementing CIPA.

                    What CIPA Requires

                    Schools and libraries subject to CIPA may not receive the discounts
                    offered by the E-rate program unless they certify that they have an
                    Internet safety policy that includes technology protection measures.
                    The protection measures must block or filter Internet access to
                    pictures that are: (a) obscene, (b) child pornography, or (c) harmful
                    to minors (for computers that are accessed by minors). Before adopting
                    this Internet safety policy, schools and libraries must provide
                    reasonable notice and hold at least one public hearing or meeting to
                    address the proposal.

                    Schools subject to CIPA are required to adopt and enforce a policy to
                    monitor online activities of minors.

                    Schools and libraries subject to CIPA are required to adopt and
                    implement an Internet safety policy addressing: (a) access by minors to
                    inappropriate matter on the Internet; (b) the safety and security of
                    minors when using electronic mail, chat rooms, and other forms of
                    direct electronic communications; (c) unauthorized access, including
                    so-called “hacking,” and other unlawful activities by minors online;
                    (d) unauthorized disclosure, use, and dissemination of personal
                    information regarding minors; and (e) measures restricting minors’
                    access to materials harmful to them.

                    Schools and libraries are required to certify that they have their
                    safety policies and technology in place before receiving E-rate funding.

                    CIPA does not affect E-rate funding for schools and libraries receiving
                    discounts only for telecommunications, such as telephone service.

                    An authorized person may disable the blocking or filtering measure
                    during any use by an adult to enable access for bona fide research or
                    other lawful purposes.

                    CIPA does not require the tracking of Internet use by minors or adults.

                    You can find out more about CIPA or apply for E-rate funding by
                    contacting the Universal Service Administrative Company’s (USAC)
                    Schools and Libraries Division (SLD) at www.sl.universalservice.org.
                    SLD also operates a client service bureau to answer questions at
                    1-888-203-8100 or via e-mail through the SLD Web site.
                  • Nancy Willard
                    Like I said ­ no educators. BUT Anne Collier is top notch. And she has been spending time with ed tech visionaries. She has also presented at NECC and
                    Message 9 of 18 , Nov 11 2:05 PM
                      Like I said ­ no educators.

                      BUT Anne Collier is top notch. And she has been spending time with ed tech
                      visionaries. She has also presented at NECC and attended other
                      presentations. You can read Anne¹s blog here: http://www.netfamilynews.org/.
                      I recommend signing up for her weekly newsletter.

                      Larry Magid has a PhD in educational policy. But more recently, he has been
                      working as a journalist. He is chair of the education subcommittee. They had
                      a meeting addressing education. I was a presenter. Also presenting: Mike
                      Donlin from Seattle School District - ed tech and safe schools- also creator
                      of really good cyberbullying curriculum:
                      http://www.seattleschools.org/area/prevention/cbms.html. Patti Agatston -
                      Cobb County schools ­ safe schools ­ one of the risk prevention
                      professionals in the country who is focusing on cyberbullying:
                      http://www.cyberbullyhelp.com/ . They also had a presentation from Common
                      Sense Media ­ also a dynamite organization in this area.
                      http://www.commonsense.com/internet-safety-guide/. One person they wanted to
                      present ­ but he could not - is Jim Teicher, CyberSmart
                      http://www.cybersmartcurriculum.org/.

                      For the record all the researchers and the high level bullying prevention
                      folks who are addressing cyberbullying connect with each other ­ we
                      collaborate, exchange research discuss issues. And cyberbullying is NOT an
                      Internet safety issue. It is a bullying concern that needs to be addressed
                      in the context of bullying prevention. One time I was on a panel at a
                      conference about cyberbullying and everyone else on the panel was from an
                      ³Internet safety organization.² There was one school administrator and Art,
                      an educator, was on the panel. But I was the only one on the panel with a
                      professional background working with at risk youth (M.S. in special ed with
                      a focus on at risk youth). They were all talking about this from the
                      perspective of ³Internet safety² and I was trying to educate the folks that
                      these are bullying issues ­ not Internet safety issues.

                      Anne and Larry have written a great document on Internet safety 3.0. It is
                      here:
                      http://www.connectsafely.org/Commentaries-Staff/online-safety-30-empowering-
                      and-protecting-youth.html. Also their sites Connect Safely
                      http://www.connectsafely.org/ and Safe Kids http://www.safekids.com/ have
                      top notch information.

                      Note the coverage by Adam Theirer, also on the working group, here:
                      http://techliberation.com/2009/08/25/collier-magids-online-safety-3-0-a-refr
                      eshing-approach-to-internet-safety/. Fortunately, Adam is also a co-chair ­
                      of the protection technologies subcommittee.

                      I have known Hemu for many years now and know he has a ³good head² when it
                      comes to these issues. It was his leadership that led to the establishment
                      of the Berkman task force that issued the report on the research that has
                      helped to debunk all of the fear-mongering about Internet dangers.

                      Tim Lordan¹s title says ³education² but he basically provides education ­ or
                      tries to ­ to members of Congress. He also is on the right path. Marsali
                      with IKeepSafe started as a DOJ-funded organization and their first
                      materials Faux Paws, were, IMHO, really bad. But she is also on the right
                      path of understanding and the newer material on her site is good.

                      I avoid committees, just in case you are wondering.

                      Nancy



                      > The Working Group reports to the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for
                      > Communications and Information and Congress. Within a year of convening
                      > its first meeting, the group will submit a report of its findings and
                      > make recommendations on how to increase online safety measures.
                      >
                      > Hemanshu Nigam and Anne Collier will act as Co-Chairs of the Group.
                      >
                      > Private sector members of the working group include:
                      >
                      > Ms. Parry Aftab, WiredSafety
                      > Ms. Elizabeth Banker, Yahoo! Inc.
                      > Mr. Christopher Bubb, AOL
                      > Ms. Anne Collier, Net Family News, Inc./ConnectSafely.org
                      > Mr. Bradon Cox, NetChoice Coalition
                      > Ms. Caroline Curtin, Microsoft
                      > Mr. Brian Cute, Afilias U.S.A.
                      > Mr. Jeremy Geigle, Arizona Family Council
                      > Ms. Marsali Hancock, Internet Keep Safe Coalition
                      > Mr. Michael Kaiser, National Cyber Security Alliance
                      > Mr. Christopher Kelly, Facebook
                      > Ms. Hedda Litwin, Cyberspace Law Counsel of the National Association of
                      > Attorneys General
                      > Mr. Brian Knapp, Loopt, Inc.
                      > Mr. Timothy Lordan, Internet Education Foundation
                      > Mr. Larry Magid, SafeKids.com/ConnectSafely.org
                      > Mr. Brian Markwalter, Consumer Electronics Association
                      > Mr. Michael McKeehan, Verizon Communications, Inc.
                      > Dr. Samuel McQuade, III, Rochester Institute of Technology
                      > Ms. Orit Michiel, Motion Picture Association of America, Inc.
                      > Mr. John Morris, Center for Democracy & Technology
                      > Mr. Jonathon Nevett, Network Solutions, LLC
                      > Mr. Hemanshu Nigam, News Corporation | MySpace
                      > Ms. Jill Nissen, Ning, Inc.
                      > Mr. Jay Opperman, Comcast Corporation
                      > Mr. Kevin Rupy, United States Telecom Association
                      > Mr. John Shehan, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
                      > Mr. K. Dane Snowden, CTIA - the Wireless Association
                      > Mr. Adam Thierer, Progress & Freedom Foundation
                      > Ms. Patricia Vance, Entertainment Software Rating Board
                      > Mr. Ralph Yarro, The CP80 Foundation
                      > Federal Government Participants of the Working Group Include:
                      >
                      > Robert Cannon, Federal Communications Commission
                      > Cheryl Petty Garnett, U.S. Department of Education
                      > Monique Perez Roth, U.S. Department of Justice
                      > Nat Wood, Federal Trade Commission
                      >
                      > -
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      --
                      Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                      Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                      http://csriu.org
                      http://cyberbully.org
                      http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                      http://csriu.wordpress.com
                      nwillard@...

                      Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                      Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                      Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                      Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Art Wolinsky
                      ... Good? No. It is what it is. It s just looking at the ripples that were created by it and seeing the glass as half full. When given a lemon, make
                      Message 10 of 18 , Nov 11 2:51 PM
                        At 02:03 PM 11/11/2009, you wrote:
                        >So you think the Megan Meiers story was good because it led to the creation
                        >of an Internet safety task force. I think it was exceptionally BAD because
                        >it VERY LIKELY led other young people to commit suicide!!!!!

                        Good? No. It is what it is. It's just looking
                        at the ripples that were created by it and seeing
                        the glass as half full. When given a lemon, make
                        lemonade. Other cliches, anyone?

                        As far as being VERY LIKELY to have lead to other
                        suicides, it would seem to me that someone would
                        have looked into that. I think it would be
                        relatively easy for someone in the suicide
                        prevention community to do a study. Was there a
                        statistically significant increase in teen
                        suicides after the incident? It was certainly in the news long enough.

                        >The Menendez/Wasserman Schultz legislation, as currently drafted, will not
                        >fund the kinds of initiatives that will effectively address the very
                        >legitimate concerns of the young people who are at higher risk online.

                        Higher risk for what? Suicide? How about this
                        quote from the Menendez article? "For a school
                        full of professionals to turn their back on her
                        and never send a letter - they had to know
                        something was going on with my daughter," said
                        Cynthia Logan, whose daughter, Jessie, had sent a
                        photo of herself to her boyfriend. "She took her
                        own life when no one would help her stop the
                        harassment." The bill seeks to prevent this by
                        providing resources and training to schools to
                        keep THIS sort of thing and the Jeffrey Johnston
                        sort of thing from happening.

                        Let's agree to disagree on this one. Just as
                        with ANY professional development, it is not the
                        process that leads up to the awarding of a
                        contract, it is the quality of professional
                        development delivered that will make the difference.

                        >Gee, maybe I need to move to New Jersey to get
                        >Sen Menendez¹s staff to listen to me.

                        Yeah, that's the ticket.

                        Art

                        Art Wolinsky
                        OEO 3DWriting.com
                        Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                        Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                        awolinsky@...
                        (609) 618-4433

                        I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                        I will surely learn a great deal today.
                      • Nancy Willard
                        Admittedly impossible to ³prove² a connection between news coverage and individual instances of suicide. However as I recall, timing-wise and I could be
                        Message 11 of 18 , Nov 11 4:12 PM
                          Admittedly impossible to ³prove² a connection between news coverage and
                          individual instances of suicide. However as I recall, timing-wise and I
                          could be wrong about this, but I think Jessie Logan committed suicide during
                          the time when there was a lot of press coverage of Megan Meiers.

                          Here is what the suicide prevention community says. Reporting on Suicide:
                          Recommendations for the Media ­ report issued by the Centers for Disease
                          Control and Prevention, National Institute of Mental Health, Office of the
                          Surgeon General Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration,
                          American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, American Association of
                          Suicidology, Annenberg Public Policy Center.
                          http://www.sprc.org/library/sreporting.pdf.

                          Specifically these guidelines state: ³The cause of an individual suicide is
                          invariably more complicated than a recent painful event such as the break-up
                          of a relationship or the loss of a job.²

                          In Megan¹s case, this was a several hour nasty fight. The news coverage did
                          not address concerns associated with the fact that a 13 year old emotionally
                          vulnerable girl was allowed to develop an online romantic relationship with
                          a 16 year boy who no one knew in person and who did not even have a
                          telephone.
                          http://suburbanjournals.stltoday.com/articles/2007/11/13/news/sj2tn20071110-
                          1111stc_pokin_1.ii1.tx;
                          http://suburbanjournals.stltoday.com/articles/2007/12/03/news/doc47543edb763
                          a7031547461.txt; http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2008/11/lori-drew-pla-3/.
                          And further, the last thing she said to her mother, who got angry with her
                          for her involvement in this fight, was ³You are my mom, you are supposed to
                          be on my side.² I used to be a teacher of emotionally disturbed children
                          just slightly younger than Megan and, based on that professional expertise,
                          I strongly suspect that there were lots more things going on this this young
                          person¹s very tragic situation.

                          But of greater concern, from the guidelines: ³Dramatizing the impact of
                          suicide through descriptions and pictures of grieving relatives, teachers or
                          classmates or community expressions of grief may encourage potential victims
                          to see suicide as a way of getting attention or as a form of retaliation
                          against others.²

                          It is essential to stop trying to encourage Internet safety ­ or federal
                          legislation - by communicating that suicide is an option for youth to
                          consider.
                          http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/local/Broad-coalition-talks-cyberbullying-
                          on-Hill-8381360-64160742.html.

                          John Halligan, whose son Ryan also committed suicide in the context of
                          cyberbullying does a presentation for students that is focused on
                          encouraging bystanders to speak up. John has studied the issues of suicide
                          and bullying prevention and has, I am told by other professionals, an
                          exceptionally good way to approach this. But he has taken the time to
                          become an expert in suicide prevention. He is not using grieving parents as
                          a way to get press coverage and pass legislation.

                          In 2007, I published the first book on cyberbullying that presents a
                          comprehensive approach for school officials to respond to this concern that
                          is grounded in effective bullying prevention, with provisions to ensure the
                          greatest likelihood of success. As I said, these are not Internet safety
                          concerns, they are bullying prevention concerns. These are concerns that
                          need to be addressed by the safe schools personnel ­ in comprehensive
                          programs, that are grounded in the research insight, and use effective
                          evaluation measures to ensure effectiveness. I also really focus strongly on
                          how schools can help provide those students who have been targeted with
                          guidance leading to resilience to handle the situations. I really like a new
                          suicide prevention program called Sources of Strength ­ and I have
                          recommendations on how to use this program with the young people who have
                          been targets. I will soon be releasing more materials on this soon.

                          What I have tried to communicate to the staff of Sen Menendez and Rep
                          Wasserman Schultz is that the current language of the bills is not going to
                          do what needs to be done. We do not need funding going to the Internet
                          safety organizations, like Wired Safety, IKeepSafe, and I-Safe to create yet
                          more ³Internet safety education.² We need funding going to states in the
                          form of block grants to establish a multidisciplinary task force ­ at the
                          state level ­ that includes education (safe schools, ed tech, health),
                          justice (juvenile justice and Internet crime), and mental health. And then
                          we need discretionary grants to go to youth risk prevention programs ­
                          schools, agencies, organizations ­ to implement new initiatives to address
                          these concerns. And this needs to be done in a manner that ensures the
                          programs are grounded in accurate research insight and are using effective
                          risk prevention approaches ­ with a heavy emphasis on evaluation.

                          The first version of the Menendez legislation, which was announced to the
                          Internet safety community by Parry Aftab¹s lobbyist so I assume Parry had
                          something to do with this, was to have a congressionally appointed task
                          force decide what kinds of Internet safety education programs should be
                          funded ­ and then provide funding ­ to the same organizations that would
                          likely have been on the task force. Can you spell ³conflict of interest?²
                          Within the Internet safety community, I am the one who threw a fit about
                          this. And the legislation was changed somewhat. But it is still primarily
                          directed at providing funding to the vested interests ­ those Internet
                          safety organizations with DC lobbyists.

                          And if the language is not changed, I will seek to encourage educators to
                          object. As readers of this message have likely detected, this position has
                          placed me at odds with some of those in the Internet safety community ­ the
                          ones who after a meeting with Sen Menendez, a colleague of mine described as
                          ³salivating Pavlovian dogs.²

                          Nancy






                          > At 02:03 PM 11/11/2009, you wrote:
                          >> >So you think the Megan Meiers story was good because it led to the creation
                          >> >of an Internet safety task force. I think it was exceptionally BAD because
                          >> >it VERY LIKELY led other young people to commit suicide!!!!!
                          >
                          > Good? No. It is what it is. It's just looking
                          > at the ripples that were created by it and seeing
                          > the glass as half full. When given a lemon, make
                          > lemonade. Other cliches, anyone?
                          >
                          > As far as being VERY LIKELY to have lead to other
                          > suicides, it would seem to me that someone would
                          > have looked into that. I think it would be
                          > relatively easy for someone in the suicide
                          > prevention community to do a study. Was there a
                          > statistically significant increase in teen
                          > suicides after the incident? It was certainly in the news long enough.
                          >
                          >> >The Menendez/Wasserman Schultz legislation, as currently drafted, will not
                          >> >fund the kinds of initiatives that will effectively address the very
                          >> >legitimate concerns of the young people who are at higher risk online.
                          >
                          > Higher risk for what? Suicide? How about this
                          > quote from the Menendez article? "For a school
                          > full of professionals to turn their back on her
                          > and never send a letter - they had to know
                          > something was going on with my daughter," said
                          > Cynthia Logan, whose daughter, Jessie, had sent a
                          > photo of herself to her boyfriend. "She took her
                          > own life when no one would help her stop the
                          > harassment." The bill seeks to prevent this by
                          > providing resources and training to schools to
                          > keep THIS sort of thing and the Jeffrey Johnston
                          > sort of thing from happening.
                          >
                          > Let's agree to disagree on this one. Just as
                          > with ANY professional development, it is not the
                          > process that leads up to the awarding of a
                          > contract, it is the quality of professional
                          > development delivered that will make the difference.
                          >
                          >> >Gee, maybe I need to move to New Jersey to get
                          >> >Sen Menendez¹s staff to listen to me.
                          >
                          > Yeah, that's the ticket.
                          >
                          > Art
                          >
                          > Art Wolinsky
                          > OEO 3DWriting.com
                          > Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                          > Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                          > awolinsky@... <mailto:awolinsky%403dwriting.com>
                          > (609) 618-4433
                          >
                          > I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                          > I will surely learn a great deal today.
                          >

                          --
                          Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                          Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                          http://csriu.org
                          http://cyberbully.org
                          http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                          http://csriu.wordpress.com
                          nwillard@...

                          Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                          Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                          Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                          Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Art Wolinsky
                          ... There are areas agreement and disagreement. I ve stated my points simply and will leave it at that. However, characterizing the participants of the
                          Message 12 of 18 , Nov 12 4:48 AM
                            At 07:12 PM 11/11/2009, you wrote:
                            >As readers of this message have likely detected, this position has
                            >placed me at odds with some of those in the Internet safety community ­ the
                            >ones who after a meeting with Sen Menendez, a colleague of mine described as
                            >"salivating Pavlovian dogs."

                            There are areas agreement and disagreement. I've
                            stated my points simply and will leave it at
                            that. However, characterizing the participants
                            of the meeting as "salivating Pavlovian dogs" is
                            grossly inaccurate and inappropriate comment for
                            that person have made and for you to post here,
                            unless you agree with that assessment and want to
                            post it as your opinion as well.

                            I'll keep this brief, because I don't want saliva to short out the keyboard.

                            Art


                            Art Wolinsky
                            OEO 3DWriting.com
                            Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                            Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                            awolinsky@...
                            (609) 618-4433

                            I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                            I will surely learn a great deal today.
                          • Nancy Willard
                            That was the comment made and this happens to be my opinion of about 90% of the lobbyists in DC. But at that point in time, the legislation was going to
                            Message 13 of 18 , Nov 12 7:33 AM
                              That was the comment made and this happens to be my opinion of about 90% of
                              the lobbyists in DC.

                              But at that point in time, the legislation was going to establish a
                              congressionally-appointed task force that would make a report on ³best
                              practices² in Internet safety education. Reportedly, no one in this group
                              appeared to have an understanding of the concept of ³scientifically-based
                              best practices.² There are no scientifically-based best practices in
                              Internet safety education. I would certainly not suggest that my approaches
                              have achieved this status. But no one else¹s have either. Then the
                              legislation was going to provide funding for Internet safety organizations ­
                              some of whom would have served to the task force. Reportedly, again I was
                              not present, there was a discussion about how to avoid the appearances of a
                              conflict of interest.

                              Then when I pointedly pointed out the major conflict of interest in an
                              email, people realized this was not going to fly. The language was changed
                              to what is now in the Menendez bill. This new bill actually is closer to
                              what is needed. But this time, the legislation would fund an organization to
                              identify best practices ­ and give the organization 3 months to do this.
                              Actually would not take 3 months. It would take 1 sentence. ³There are no
                              scientifically-based best practices to address Internet safety.²

                              Of significant concern is that DOJ would be responsible for this. And DOJ
                              funded an evaluation of Isafe that determined it was effective asking
                              questions like ³How much do you know about cyber bullying?² And ³How much
                              do you know about Internet predators?² With the available responses being:
                              ³Nothing at all. A little. Some. A lot.² This is clearly not effective
                              evaluation of instruction. And yet based on this evaluation, DOJ considers
                              Isafe to have been proven effective:
                              http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/topics/crime-prevention/school-safety/effective
                              -programs.htm

                              The Menendez legislation did expand the entities that could receive the
                              funds to include schools, agencies, and organizations. But then we have Rep
                              Wasserman Schultz¹s amended bill. And she went back to what has always been
                              the essential underlying objective of this legislation. Rep. Wasserman
                              Schultz specifically stated: Our bill will establish a competitive grant
                              program so that non-profit Internet safety organizations can work together
                              with schools and communities to educate students, teachers, and parents
                              about these online dangers.

                              So there are the following problems with this legislation:

                              It still appears that the underlying intent is to provide funding for
                              Internet safety organizations to create and deliver Internet safety
                              education. It is inappropriate for the federal government to control the
                              creation of curriculum and provision of professional development. It is
                              especially of concern that DOJ, which must focus on the high risk concerns,
                              in control of instruction which must have a broader approach ­ digital media
                              safety and literacy. The private sector can handle this aspect of what needs
                              to be done.

                              It is highly likely that the ³Internet safety education² approaches that
                              would be funded under this bill will be the same types of fear-based
                              messaging ­ fear of online predators, fear of teens committing suicide ­
                              that are still predominant. And these kinds of messages are directly
                              interfering with our ability to shift schools into 21st Learning communities
                              infused with web 2.0 interactive technologies.

                              It is really, really important that we do address the concerns of the young
                              people who are at greater risk online. We will not be able to effectively
                              accomplish this through ³education.² It is necessary to have such education
                              (provided by the private sector) AND targeted risk prevention programs. Most
                              ³Internet safety education organizations² do not currently have the
                              professional capacity to develop and implement effective risk prevention and
                              intervention programs. Several are shifting so that they would have this
                              capacity. But this is what we need federal funding to address.

                              There are no scientifically based best practices. So we need other
                              provisions to ensure that the programs funded would have a significant
                              likelihood of success.

                              I have tried to provide guidance to change the language of the bills. But I
                              do not have the relationships with the staff people that the DC lobbyists or
                              Parry have. Because I live in Oregon.

                              I also have spoken out against the fear-based messaging that many of the
                              Internet safety organizations supporting this legislation are still
                              presenting, so this has placed me at odds with them.

                              This is a difficult situation.

                              Nancy



                              > At 07:12 PM 11/11/2009, you wrote:
                              >> >As readers of this message have likely detected, this position has
                              >> >placed me at odds with some of those in the Internet safety community ­ the
                              >> >ones who after a meeting with Sen Menendez, a colleague of mine described as
                              >> >"salivating Pavlovian dogs."
                              >
                              > There are areas agreement and disagreement. I've
                              > stated my points simply and will leave it at
                              > that. However, characterizing the participants
                              > of the meeting as "salivating Pavlovian dogs" is
                              > grossly inaccurate and inappropriate comment for
                              > that person have made and for you to post here,
                              > unless you agree with that assessment and want to
                              > post it as your opinion as well.
                              >
                              > I'll keep this brief, because I don't want saliva to short out the keyboard.
                              >
                              > Art
                              >
                              > Art Wolinsky
                              > OEO 3DWriting.com
                              > Technology Director - Online Internet Institute
                              > Educational Technology Director - WiredSafety.org
                              > awolinsky@... <mailto:awolinsky%403dwriting.com>
                              > (609) 618-4433
                              >
                              > I am perfectly capable of learning from my mistakes.
                              > I will surely learn a great deal today.
                              >
                              >
                              >


                              --
                              Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                              Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                              http://csriu.org
                              http://cyberbully.org
                              http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                              http://csriu.wordpress.com
                              nwillard@...

                              Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                              Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                              Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                              Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)






                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • BBracey@aol.com
                              I don t have a dog in this fight. I do attend the meetings of the council and I wish that Nancy Willard was able to attend and to address her concerns. Most of
                              Message 14 of 18 , Nov 12 8:45 AM
                                I don't have a dog in this fight. I do attend the meetings of the
                                council and I wish that Nancy Willard was able to attend and to address
                                her concerns. Most of us working stiffs cannot afford to attend the
                                numerous meetings, concalls, symposiums and events.


                                I take issue with her on a couple of points but believe we need
                                everyone from different points of view to pay attention . be involved
                                and to watchdog the legislation.

                                I don't think that Parry Aftab is using the parents who volunteer to
                                tell the story of the children they have lost no more than Nancy is
                                using the story of the substitute who had such a trial. I think we
                                learn from a lot of sources and that both sets of information and the
                                cases are legitimate for us to learn about.

                                Nancy says
                                It still appears that the underlying intent is to provide funding for
                                Internet safety organizations to create and deliver Internet safety
                                education.

                                If this is true, it is a start. I don't believe this is the only
                                purpose for the legislation. The companies want well informed,
                                participants in their online service groups , and have to be very
                                careful of inappropriateness in their offerings, and of the way in
                                which the paraticipatory culture is "managed>" That may not be an
                                appropriate description, but they are legally responsible for the
                                goings on , on line. Nancy may be a better expert on this , but the
                                sense that I have of the overwhelming response from the interested
                                businesses is a
                                part of their mission and online commitment to safety on the Internet.
                                It comes in all flavors.


                                It is inappropriate for the federal government to control the
                                creation of curriculum and provision of professional development. It is
                                especially of concern that DOJ, which must focus on the high risk
                                concerns,
                                in control of instruction which must have a broader approach digital
                                media
                                safety and literacy. The private sector can handle this aspect of what
                                needs
                                to be done.

                                As a member of the NIIAC we believed the private sector was going to
                                give the nation broadband. That was in 1995.. didn't happen.

                                Nancy says
                                It is highly likely that the ³Internet safety education² approaches that
                                would be funded under this bill will be the same types of fear-based
                                messaging fear of online predators, fear of teens committing suicide
                                that are still predominant.

                                Highly likely that there will be a number of approaches. Each entity
                                has a different approach based on their experts and resources.
                                I am sorry that Nancy is not one of the experts, but it is Washngton .
                                She would almost have to be embedded in the city as the meetings are
                                fast, frequent and furious. The last meeting was November 5th. Any of
                                us can attend and be a part of the open comment for the topic of the
                                meeting.


                                Nancy says

                                And these kinds of messages are directly
                                interfering with our ability to shift schools into 21st Learning
                                communities
                                infused with web 2.0 interactive technologies.

                                It is not, in my opinion the messages that interfere, but the fear that
                                the schools have that they would be liable, same fear that the
                                businesses have. 2.0 is just a stopping point , we are way beyond that
                                in supercomputing and other technology initiatives and that is why the
                                businesses want to be careful , they too can be sued.

                                I have always appreciated Nancy's due diligence and outreach. We are
                                friends I think. For a long time she was the only voice.
                                Bill Belsey, Nancy Willard, Parry Aftab, all different approaches but
                                necessary.

                                Can't we all get along? Why should we be afraid of the Dept. of Justice
                                I want to know, there are three groups weighing in on the study and the
                                Dept of Education has a group of people who attend as well as the
                                Federal Trade Commission. My sister is the EEOC person a the FTC. I
                                think we need them all.
                                Stakeholders
                                Students
                                Parents of Students
                                Teachers
                                Educational Admin
                                Businesspeople
                                Government
                                NGOs
                                Citizens
                                w/grown or no children
                                Media
                                Additional group breakouts for demographic overlays
                                Age
                                Race
                                Gender Education

                                I know that we have educational groups who also attend these meetings
                                and who sponsor workshops
                                Government has to paint the picture with a wide brush.

                                Email sometimes work to various legislators, as do visits to the hill,
                                real letters work too.

                                I really think that the problem with education is deeper, we have not
                                transformed educational practices, we just in many cases shoehorned
                                then in. All of the people attending the meetings are not evil . One
                                great thing that I always loved is that there are many parents who
                                attend. And I kind of liked being able to hear the concerns of the
                                people in law enforcement. ( even if they were wearing guns). One real
                                advocate for the Teen Angels is a person at FTC. Not my sister. They
                                know stories that we educators don't know and have a national
                                perspective.

                                Then there is ISTE, SITE, AACE and our own groups. We all have to think
                                long and hard about the participatory culture.

                                Information helps.



                                Bonnie Bracey Sutton
                                230 G Street SW
                                Washington DC 20024
                              • Nancy Willard
                                ... I have no idea what you mean by “council.” Do you mean the NTIA Online safety working group? If so, their function is not to focus on this legislation.
                                Message 15 of 18 , Nov 12 9:50 AM
                                  >
                                  > I don't have a dog in this fight. I do attend the meetings of the
                                  > council and I wish that Nancy Willard was able to attend and to address
                                  > her concerns. Most of us working stiffs cannot afford to attend the
                                  > numerous meetings, concalls, symposiums and events.
                                  >
                                  I have no idea what you mean by “council.” Do you mean the NTIA Online
                                  safety working group? If so, their function is not to focus on this
                                  legislation. They are writing a report.

                                  > Nancy says
                                  > It still appears that the underlying intent is to provide funding for
                                  > Internet safety organizations to create and deliver Internet safety
                                  > education.
                                  >
                                  > If this is true, it is a start. I don't believe this is the only
                                  > purpose for the legislation. The companies want well informed,
                                  > participants in their online service groups , and have to be very
                                  > careful of inappropriateness in their offerings, and of the way in
                                  > which the paraticipatory culture is "managed>" That may not be an
                                  > appropriate description, but they are legally responsible for the
                                  > goings on , on line. Nancy may be a better expert on this , but the
                                  > sense that I have of the overwhelming response from the interested
                                  > businesses is a
                                  > part of their mission and online commitment to safety on the Internet.
                                  > It comes in all flavors.
                                  >
                                  I may be confused, but I think you are talking again about the working
                                  group. Yes, there are very good companies in this group and yes, they have
                                  consistently demonstrated a high degree of concern about the well-being of
                                  young people. Hemu Nigam of MySpace, who is co-chair of the working group
                                  being at the top of my list for “highly responsible.”

                                  But this working group has no relationship whatsoever to the pending
                                  legislation. It is my hope that the working group will make recommendations
                                  for effective legislation.

                                  The intent of the currently pending legislation was stated by Rep Wasserman
                                  Schultz – to provide funding for Internet safety organizations to provide
                                  Internet safety education. I think we need funding for risk prevention
                                  programs – schools, agencies, and organizations – to address the concerns of
                                  the young people who are at higher risk – who we will NOT effectively reach
                                  through education.

                                  > It is inappropriate for the federal government to control the
                                  > creation of curriculum and provision of professional development. It is
                                  > especially of concern that DOJ, which must focus on the high risk
                                  > concerns,
                                  > in control of instruction which must have a broader approach digital
                                  > media
                                  > safety and literacy. The private sector can handle this aspect of what
                                  > needs
                                  > to be done.
                                  >
                                  > As a member of the NIIAC we believed the private sector was going to
                                  > give the nation broadband. That was in 1995.. didn't happen.
                                  >
                                  There is a VAST, VAST, VAST difference between the federal government
                                  providing support for “conduit” and the feds controlling the “content” of
                                  curriculum. 20 U.S.C. § 3403 (b) provides that the U.S. Department of
                                  Education may not “exercise any direction, supervision, or control over the
                                  curriculum, program of instruction, ... of any educational institution,
                                  school, or school system, ... or over the selection or content of library
                                  resources, textbooks, or other instructional materials by any educational
                                  institution or school system. ...” The very sound reason for this is to
                                  avoid having the federal government control over what students learn.

                                  The organizations already providing very excellent resources that have NOT
                                  received any federal funding are CyberSmart, Common Sense Media, Connect
                                  Safely, Safe Kids. Right now, the majority of the organizations that are
                                  providing the kinds of inaccurate fear-based messaging that is causing
                                  problems in shifting to 21st century schools are the organizations that have
                                  received DOJ funding. But even some of these organizations have “seen the
                                  light” and are changing.

                                  > Nancy says
                                  > It is highly likely that the ³Internet safety education² approaches that
                                  > would be funded under this bill will be the same types of fear-based
                                  > messaging fear of online predators, fear of teens committing suicide
                                  > that are still predominant.
                                  >
                                  > Highly likely that there will be a number of approaches. Each entity
                                  > has a different approach based on their experts and resources.
                                  > I am sorry that Nancy is not one of the experts, but it is Washngton .
                                  > She would almost have to be embedded in the city as the meetings are
                                  > fast, frequent and furious. The last meeting was November 5th. Any of
                                  > us can attend and be a part of the open comment for the topic of the
                                  > meeting.
                                  >
                                  Not if the entities providing education are funded through DOJ – because DOJ
                                  is the agency that decides who will get funded. Now if DOJ would remove all
                                  of the inaccurate, fear-based information on their site, I would possibly
                                  feel more comfortable. DOJ does absolutely need to be involved – in
                                  addressing the concerns of the young people who are at a higher degree of
                                  risk, because sometimes these issues become criminal concerns. I am starting
                                  to make some inroads into law enforcement. I am presenting next week at a
                                  conference hosted by the Illinois AG and as just invited to a summit on
                                  child prostitution and self-exploitation hosted by the National District
                                  Attorneys Association. I am hoping to be able to get myself into a position
                                  where I can make recommendations on their messaging.

                                  > Nancy says
                                  >
                                  > And these kinds of messages are directly
                                  > interfering with our ability to shift schools into 21st Learning
                                  > communities
                                  > infused with web 2.0 interactive technologies.
                                  >
                                  > It is not, in my opinion the messages that interfere, but the fear that
                                  > the schools have that they would be liable, same fear that the
                                  > businesses have. 2.0 is just a stopping point , we are way beyond that
                                  > in supercomputing and other technology initiatives and that is why the
                                  > businesses want to be careful , they too can be sued.
                                  >
                                  I have checked with NSBA and they know of no case even filed against a
                                  school district based on what students have done online while at school.
                                  Speak Up told me that in their student focus groups, the students say that
                                  after teachers receive Internet safety education they place further
                                  restrictions on their Internet use. A colleague just told me of a teacher
                                  who set up a safe closed social network for her student on Ning. But a
                                  parent found out and went to the school board telling them that this teacher
                                  was placing her students at risk for online predation – and board believed
                                  the parent and the teacher was told to stop. Shall I continue?

                                  > I have always appreciated Nancy's due diligence and outreach. We are
                                  > friends I think. For a long time she was the only voice.
                                  > Bill Belsey, Nancy Willard, Parry Aftab, all different approaches but
                                  > necessary.
                                  >
                                  I have never been the only voice.

                                  > Can't we all get along?
                                  >
                                  Well, this was my perspective, until some of the Internet safety
                                  organizations worked with Rep Wasserman Schultz to have her tell the House
                                  judiciary subcommittee that I have “no credibility.” So I did not start the
                                  nastiness. I am really just trying to get the legislation to a point where
                                  it will be effective.

                                  > Why should we be afraid of the Dept. of Justice
                                  > I want to know, there are three groups weighing in on the study and the
                                  > Dept of Education has a group of people who attend as well as the
                                  > Federal Trade Commission. My sister is the EEOC person a the FTC. I
                                  > think we need them all.
                                  >
                                  Yes, what I have advocated is that the legislation provide block grants for
                                  states to establish a multidisciplinary task force to develop strategies to
                                  address these issues. And I advocate the same in local communities. I am not
                                  afraid of DOJ. The role they play is critically important. They have to be
                                  totally involved. THEY JUST SHOULD NOT BE FUNDING THE CREATION OF INTERNET
                                  SAFETY CURRICULUM!!!!! (Blast, how many times do I need to say this?)
                                  >
                                  > I know that we have educational groups who also attend these meetings
                                  > and who sponsor workshops
                                  > Government has to paint the picture with a wide brush.
                                  >
                                  > Email sometimes work to various legislators, as do visits to the hill,
                                  > real letters work too.
                                  >
                                  Real easy for someone from Oregon to do visits on the hill. I have tried to
                                  communicate – but apparently the folks supporting this legislation have
                                  successfully advised the staff not to listen to me.

                                  > I really think that the problem with education is deeper, we have not
                                  > transformed educational practices, we just in many cases shoehorned
                                  > then in. All of the people attending the meetings are not evil . One
                                  > great thing that I always loved is that there are many parents who
                                  > attend. And I kind of liked being able to hear the concerns of the
                                  > people in law enforcement. ( even if they were wearing guns). One real
                                  > advocate for the Teen Angels is a person at FTC. Not my sister. They
                                  > know stories that we educators don't know and have a national
                                  > perspective.
                                  >
                                  Please separate these issues. I have great hopes for the outcome of the NTIA
                                  working group. They have excellent leadership. But they have no
                                  relationship to the current legislation.

                                  > Then there is ISTE, SITE, AACE and our own groups. We all have to think
                                  > long and hard about the participatory culture.
                                  >
                                  Yes, clearly, the educational groups need to be taking more “ownership” of
                                  these issues. This will help to ensure that the universal education students
                                  receive is balanced and accurate.

                                  Nancy

                                  --
                                  Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                                  Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                                  http://csriu.org
                                  http://cyberbully.org
                                  http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                                  http://csriu.wordpress.com
                                  nwillard@...

                                  Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                                  Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                                  Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                                  Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)






                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • BBracey@aol.com
                                  Internet Safety I am not fighting with Nancy. There are so many groups working toward this effort. Funny as a DC resident I am the one person who cannot go to
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Nov 12 10:07 AM
                                    Internet Safety

                                    I am not fighting with Nancy. There are so many groups working toward
                                    this effort.
                                    Funny as a DC resident I am the one person who cannot go to my
                                    Congressperson and get results. Shadow Senator
                                    is why.

                                    I believe that our educational groups need to be proactive and that
                                    they could send various educated members to the various committees to
                                    testify, but that's just my opinion. I know there is a different
                                    opinion in this administration about vendors and lobbyists.

                                    We have ISTE and a lot more groups CoSN,the chiefs the association of
                                    school principals etc I don't think Nancy should advocate alone.
                                    I do think some of the groups are paying attention. The National
                                    Educational Technology Plan was not well commented on, of course I know
                                    we all are busy, that was one place where we could have made a big
                                    difference. Talking to the FCC was also an option.
                                    I go to the meetings, but there are few educators, probably the time
                                    and the place but they have begun to do webinars.

                                    ISTE offered members the right to ask for the speakers and topics, that
                                    was another place.

                                    I am not picking on Nancy, just saying we have ways to be effective and
                                    email is not the only way.

                                    I will be in Oregon, Portland area for the Supercomputing conference,
                                    Nancy if you want to meet perhaps we can think outloud together.

                                    Email can be cruel. Bonnie Bracey Sutton

                                    Parry is a Diva, that doesn't bother me. We all have different
                                    personalities. I respect her work and her personality.
                                  • Nancy Willard
                                    I think we probably should end this thread, so I will not comment further. Perfectly appropriate for others to continue. But I will not discuss this again
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Nov 12 12:52 PM
                                      I think we probably should end this thread, so I will not comment further.
                                      Perfectly appropriate for others to continue. But I will not discuss this
                                      again unless there is a need for action.

                                      I try very hard NOT to be a diva and to make sure that everything I say is
                                      grounded in research insight and effective risk prevention. But obviously I
                                      have made some enemies among those who, in my opinion, are not using
                                      effective risk prevention approaches or presenting accurate information. So
                                      if you wish, please consider me a failure for my lack of ability to
                                      effectively communicate. And if you think this is something I enjoy or want
                                      to do, please realize this is not. I feel a bit like that guy in China who
                                      stood in front of the line of tanks ­ or the kid I was in junior high who
                                      was regularly called ³Weirdo Willard.²

                                      IF legislation passes to provide $125 Million for education to address
                                      ³Internet danger² - grounded in concerns of online predators and teens
                                      committing suicide because of what has happened online - then this will set
                                      us back in establishing 21st Century schools.

                                      AND IF legislation as currently drafted passes, it will not effectively
                                      address the very real concerns of the minority of at risk youth who are also
                                      at risk online.

                                      AND BASED on the way DOJ has addressed the education issues so far, the
                                      thought of them deciding which Internet education messages to fund and which
                                      not to fund gives me great concern BECAUSE it is highly unlikely that DOJ is
                                      going to fund the creation of messages that effectively address the safety
                                      concerns in the context of overall citizenship and literacy. DOJ is
                                      rightfully focused on the teens who are at greater risk and they are not
                                      educators or librarians. I do not expect them to have this kind of
                                      expertise.

                                      SO, if the time comes when I need to launch some opposition to this
                                      legislation, I hope that some of you will agree with me and will be willing
                                      to communicate this.

                                      All best and ³over and out.²

                                      Nancy


                                      > Internet Safety
                                      >
                                      > I am not fighting with Nancy. There are so many groups working toward
                                      > this effort.
                                      > Funny as a DC resident I am the one person who cannot go to my
                                      > Congressperson and get results. Shadow Senator
                                      > is why.
                                      >
                                      > I believe that our educational groups need to be proactive and that
                                      > they could send various educated members to the various committees to
                                      > testify, but that's just my opinion. I know there is a different
                                      > opinion in this administration about vendors and lobbyists.
                                      >
                                      > We have ISTE and a lot more groups CoSN,the chiefs the association of
                                      > school principals etc I don't think Nancy should advocate alone.
                                      > I do think some of the groups are paying attention. The National
                                      > Educational Technology Plan was not well commented on, of course I know
                                      > we all are busy, that was one place where we could have made a big
                                      > difference. Talking to the FCC was also an option.
                                      > I go to the meetings, but there are few educators, probably the time
                                      > and the place but they have begun to do webinars.
                                      >
                                      > ISTE offered members the right to ask for the speakers and topics, that
                                      > was another place.
                                      >
                                      > I am not picking on Nancy, just saying we have ways to be effective and
                                      > email is not the only way.
                                      >
                                      > I will be in Oregon, Portland area for the Supercomputing conference,
                                      > Nancy if you want to meet perhaps we can think outloud together.
                                      >
                                      > Email can be cruel. Bonnie Bracey Sutton
                                      >
                                      > Parry is a Diva, that doesn't bother me. We all have different
                                      > personalities. I respect her work and her personality.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >


                                      --
                                      Nancy Willard, M.S., J.D.
                                      Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use
                                      http://csriu.org
                                      http://cyberbully.org
                                      http://cyber-safe-kids.com
                                      http://csriu.wordpress.com
                                      nwillard@...

                                      Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats: Responding to the Challenge of Online Social
                                      Aggression, Threats, and Distress (Research Press)

                                      Cyber-Safe Kids, Cyber-Savvy Teens: Helping Young People Learn to Use the
                                      Internet Safely and Responsibly (Jossey-Bass)






                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Kelly Kuntz
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Nov 17 6:12 AM
                                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.