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Test taking

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  • skmackie
    Is there a way to improve test taking abilities. I just took a test in Organic Chemistry and my grade was okay but I want better than okay. The test was much
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 16 2:35 PM
      Is there a way to improve test taking abilities. I just took a test in Organic Chemistry and my
      grade was okay but I want better than okay. The test was much longer than I anticipated, like
      1.5 - 2 hours long. Much of what I marked incorrectly I knew but somehow it didn't make it
      to the page. This must happen a lot with most people.

      Any suggestions appreciated.

      Sheryl
    • cmartin336@aol.com
      Test taking should be trained. Therefore the best would be, to start early enough and prepare tests oneself. There are books available with problems and their
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 17 3:15 AM
        Test taking should be trained. Therefore the best would be, to start early enough and prepare tests oneself. There are books available with problems and their solutions. From them one can collect some problems and try to solve them in a limited time.
        If one does that every month, then one is fit.

        regards
        Claus

        -----Urspr√ľngliche Mitteilung-----
        Von: skmackie@...
        An: wwbc@yahoogroups.com
        Verschickt: Mo., 16.Okt.2006, 23:35
        Thema: [wwbc] Test taking

        Is there a way to improve test taking abilities. I just took a test in Organic

        Chemistry and my

        grade was okay but I want better than okay. The test was much longer than I

        anticipated, like

        1.5 - 2 hours long. Much of what I marked incorrectly I knew but somehow it

        didn't make it

        to the page. This must happen a lot with most people.



        Any suggestions appreciated.



        Sheryl











        Also see the collabarative Mentat Wiki at http://ludism.org/mentat for

        information on how to become a better thinker.



        Yahoo! Groups Links



        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wwbc/


        mailto:wwbc-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • skmackie
        Hi Breen, I m taking organic at the college level. I didn t do as well as I could because I noted that I knew a lot of answers that I either missed putting
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 17 9:51 AM
          Hi Breen,

          I'm taking organic at the college level. I didn't do as well as I could because I noted that I
          knew a lot of answers that I either missed putting down or wrote down incorrectly on the
          exam.

          Is mind mapping where you memorize things by associating them with a physical location?

          S

          --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, "Breen at Blueyonder" <breen@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Sheryl,
          >
          > There are many techniques to help you do better in exams. They are mostly 'traditional'
          methods, although of course you could combine them with mind maps techniques or
          other ways of thinking.
          >
          > However what you have to do it read through the various hints and techniques, then
          pick out those things that will help you. For example, here's a set of exam advice;
          > http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/learning/online/examtips/examprep.html
          > Everything there is sensible. However there are several things there that I could not do.
          As one example, one piece of advice is, I quote;
          > a.. Don't start writing out your answer straight away. Spend a few minutes writing brief
          notes (or a spider diagram, etc.) showing key points you will cover, and possibly how you
          plan to structure your answer.
          >
          > HOWEVER I am nervous in exams, so what I try to do is simply start writing immediately,
          on the first question I know will crop up and I know I can do, to 'get a few marks'. Then
          this relaxes me and I can start to then look at the rest of the paper.
          >
          > Good advice also usually says to take a long time at the start mapping out your strategy,
          what questions you will answer, etc. That page talks about 'spider diagrams'. Well almost
          no one does that. At most students spend a minute or 2 looking at the paper. If you take
          10 minutes, you'll look around see everyone else scribbling away, and that will upset you.
          >
          > Other advice usually says to stop studying a long time before the exam. That page says,
          I quote, "Try to finish formal revision a couple of days before first exam." Now it's great
          advice. But I could never stop revision TWO WHOLE DAYS before the exam. I think almost
          NO student does that. But there does come a point, which I think differs for each student,
          when it's no point trying to learn anything new. (For me that might be anytime the evening
          before. Sometimes it's midnight, sometimes it's 10pm.) So it's great advice, but you have
          to decide at what point YOU will stop .
          >
          > All the advice is like that. You have to decide which to adopt. For example, here's a
          DIFFERENT set of pre-exam and exam advice.
          > http://www.open.ac.uk/study-strategies/revision/pages/the_exam_itself.asp
          > A little bit of that is specific to the Open University, however it's all good advice. You got
          to pick and choose those methods which help you.
          >
          > (Then combine them with mind map techniques.)
          >
          > Now if you asked ME to give you one personal piece of advice, which would be more
          important than anything else, I would say the following.
          >
          > IF you have a specimen exam paper for the exam, any work you do on that will be
          extremely beneficial. If all you can do is look through it, look at the solutions, and get a
          feel for what the structure of the exam will be, then do that. If you can do a mock exam
          and 'study' the speciman exam paper, them mores the better.
          >
          > If you don't get a speciman exam paper, or if you've done the above, the next best thing
          is to use PAST EXAM PAPERS. The same applies, i.e. ANYTHING you can do with that, even
          if it's briefly looking over the last years paper and getting a feel for what type of questions
          they will ask, will help you a lot.The more work you do, the better. (Usually for annual
          exams, going back 3 years is about as much as is sensible, after that the earlier papers are
          less beneficial.)
          >
          > Okay, now I've made an assumption that you're talking about an annual exam. However
          you're only said you've taken a 'test', it could be a mid-term test. But much of the general
          exam advice will still apply.
          >
          > You also haven't said what level you're studying at. I gave two university links, with
          advice for doing exams for undergraduates. But the advice all applies to any level, once
          you adapt it to yourself.
          >
          > You're said you do organic chemisty. Well all of the advice above applies to any subject.
          >
          > Finally, it may be you already know all of the above, and you're specific problem was
          performance during the exam/test. However the better prepared you are, the better you
          will do and the calmer you will be.
          >
          > But look at that Open University link. It has some notes on anxiety and concerns about
          exams. Whatever level you are studying at, whether it's high school or before that or after
          that or university level or private school, the general advice still holds.
          >
          > I hope that helps. Without knowing exactly why you feel you haven't done as well as you
          could have, I can't say any more.
          >
          > Preparation, preparation, preparation.
          >
          > Good luck.
          > Breen
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Lee Mills
          I majored in psyc, and tests show that you can improve your scores by as much as 25% by listening to Mozart before taking a test. Heavy metal will cause your
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 17 12:50 PM
            I majored in psyc, and tests show that you can improve
            your scores by as much as 25% by listening to Mozart
            before taking a test. Heavy metal will cause your
            scores to go down. Also, it's been shown that your
            first impulse on an answer is usually the right
            one-over 80% of the time, if I remember correctly.

            I had a friend in college who would study and study
            and then freeze at a question. I calmly told her,
            "Lindsey, you know this." She stopped a moment, then
            gave the correct answer. (She was trying too hard and
            stressing herself out.) She used this same technique
            on herself when she went to test. When she panicked,
            she just stopped and said calmly to herself, "Lindsey,
            you know this." She told me that the answers came back
            to her more easily this way (she made an A).

            With most material, it's best to do an overview read,
            then go back and hit specifics you need more help with
            individually until you have them, then do another
            overview. I was Dean's List and Phi Theta Kappa, etc.,
            and this worked really well for me, enough I didn't
            have to spend near the study time others did (took
            seven finals in one week once).

            You might also invest in a course like Kevin Trudeau's
            Mega Memory-you can pick this up very reasonably on
            ebay, and it works.

            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com
          • Breen at Blueyonder
            Hello Sheryl, There are many techniques to help you do better in exams. They are mostly traditional methods, although of course you could combine them with
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 17 1:04 PM
              Hello Sheryl,

              There are many techniques to help you do better in exams. They are mostly 'traditional' methods, although of course you could combine them with mind maps techniques or other ways of thinking.

              However what you have to do it read through the various hints and techniques, then pick out those things that will help you. For example, here's a set of exam advice;
              http://www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/learning/online/examtips/examprep.html
              Everything there is sensible. However there are several things there that I could not do. As one example, one piece of advice is, I quote;
              a.. Don't start writing out your answer straight away. Spend a few minutes writing brief notes (or a spider diagram, etc.) showing key points you will cover, and possibly how you plan to structure your answer.

              HOWEVER I am nervous in exams, so what I try to do is simply start writing immediately, on the first question I know will crop up and I know I can do, to 'get a few marks'. Then this relaxes me and I can start to then look at the rest of the paper.

              Good advice also usually says to take a long time at the start mapping out your strategy, what questions you will answer, etc. That page talks about 'spider diagrams'. Well almost no one does that. At most students spend a minute or 2 looking at the paper. If you take 10 minutes, you'll look around see everyone else scribbling away, and that will upset you.

              Other advice usually says to stop studying a long time before the exam. That page says, I quote, "Try to finish formal revision a couple of days before first exam." Now it's great advice. But I could never stop revision TWO WHOLE DAYS before the exam. I think almost NO student does that. But there does come a point, which I think differs for each student, when it's no point trying to learn anything new. (For me that might be anytime the evening before. Sometimes it's midnight, sometimes it's 10pm.) So it's great advice, but you have to decide at what point YOU will stop .

              All the advice is like that. You have to decide which to adopt. For example, here's a DIFFERENT set of pre-exam and exam advice.
              http://www.open.ac.uk/study-strategies/revision/pages/the_exam_itself.asp
              A little bit of that is specific to the Open University, however it's all good advice. You got to pick and choose those methods which help you.

              (Then combine them with mind map techniques.)

              Now if you asked ME to give you one personal piece of advice, which would be more important than anything else, I would say the following.

              IF you have a specimen exam paper for the exam, any work you do on that will be extremely beneficial. If all you can do is look through it, look at the solutions, and get a feel for what the structure of the exam will be, then do that. If you can do a mock exam and 'study' the speciman exam paper, them mores the better.

              If you don't get a speciman exam paper, or if you've done the above, the next best thing is to use PAST EXAM PAPERS. The same applies, i.e. ANYTHING you can do with that, even if it's briefly looking over the last years paper and getting a feel for what type of questions they will ask, will help you a lot.The more work you do, the better. (Usually for annual exams, going back 3 years is about as much as is sensible, after that the earlier papers are less beneficial.)

              Okay, now I've made an assumption that you're talking about an annual exam. However you're only said you've taken a 'test', it could be a mid-term test. But much of the general exam advice will still apply.

              You also haven't said what level you're studying at. I gave two university links, with advice for doing exams for undergraduates. But the advice all applies to any level, once you adapt it to yourself.

              You're said you do organic chemisty. Well all of the advice above applies to any subject.

              Finally, it may be you already know all of the above, and you're specific problem was performance during the exam/test. However the better prepared you are, the better you will do and the calmer you will be.

              But look at that Open University link. It has some notes on anxiety and concerns about exams. Whatever level you are studying at, whether it's high school or before that or after that or university level or private school, the general advice still holds.

              I hope that helps. Without knowing exactly why you feel you haven't done as well as you could have, I can't say any more.

              Preparation, preparation, preparation.

              Good luck.
              Breen






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lee Mills
              While I think most of the advice given here is well-meaning, I also think it serves to actually complicate a process which Naila is trying to simplify. I
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 17 4:26 PM
                While I think most of the advice given here is well-meaning, I also
                think it serves to actually complicate a process which Naila is trying
                to simplify. I totally disagree that you have to give up your life to
                study for college. I carried 6 hours more than the full course load
                and ran my own business while I went to college, and I still had time
                for other things. Granted, I didn't go out every night, but I had a
                life. (A degree is also no guarantee you'll earn a living, but that's
                another argument.)

                If you have learning disabilities, then you do have an extra
                burden-maybe more than one-but that doesn't apply to everyone, and
                Naila doesn't mention any problems of this nature. One suggestion that
                was made that was good was the one about highlighting text. The mind
                thinks in pictures, and it's also been proven that colors like blue or
                green help cement information in better than plain black and white, so
                either use these color highlighters or copy the information onto cards
                of this color.

                I knew a seminary student who memorized the entire Old and New
                Testaments by using this system. He copied each verse on a different
                colored index card, and had it all memorized within 6 months time.
                That's an incredible amount of info to retain in that amount of time,
                especially given that he worked full time and went to seminary at the
                same time. I think this might be of real help to you, given that
                chemistry is a pretty dry subject. If a person can memorize all those
                begats and the book of Leviticus (I always thought it should have been
                spelled 'Leviticuss' given how hard it is to read), then it should
                work great for stuff like chemistry.

                This would also require very little money if you didn't want to invest
                in the Trudeau memory course. I know when you're going to school every
                dollar can count. Good luck. *S*


                --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, Lee Mills <lmilziz@...> wrote:
                >
                > I majored in psyc, and tests show that you can improve
                > your scores by as much as 25% by listening to Mozart
                > before taking a test. Heavy metal will cause your
                > scores to go down. Also, it's been shown that your
                > first impulse on an answer is usually the right
                > one-over 80% of the time, if I remember correctly.
                >
                > I had a friend in college who would study and study
                > and then freeze at a question. I calmly told her,
                > "Lindsey, you know this." She stopped a moment, then
                > gave the correct answer. (She was trying too hard and
                > stressing herself out.) She used this same technique
                > on herself when she went to test. When she panicked,
                > she just stopped and said calmly to herself, "Lindsey,
                > you know this." She told me that the answers came back
                > to her more easily this way (she made an A).
                >
                > With most material, it's best to do an overview read,
                > then go back and hit specifics you need more help with
                > individually until you have them, then do another
                > overview. I was Dean's List and Phi Theta Kappa, etc.,
                > and this worked really well for me, enough I didn't
                > have to spend near the study time others did (took
                > seven finals in one week once).
                >
                > You might also invest in a course like Kevin Trudeau's
                > Mega Memory-you can pick this up very reasonably on
                > ebay, and it works.
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do You Yahoo!?
                > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                > http://mail.yahoo.com
                >
              • Breen at Blueyonder
                Hello Sheryl, ... No, it isn t. Mind Maps are a technique that Tony Buzan made popular. (The concept existed before he came along, but he s written books where
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 17 6:18 PM
                  Hello Sheryl,

                  > Is mind mapping where you memorize things by associating them with a physical location?

                  No, it isn't. Mind Maps are a technique that Tony Buzan made popular. (The concept existed before he came along, but he's written books where he outlines his own set of rules to show people how to use them.)

                  In brief, you write down the central idea or concept in the center, in a circle, then you draw lines branching out, in tree structures. Against each line you write words.

                  The main idea is that this is non linear, so instead of taking notes on a page, you write the notes where each word is a key idea on the mind map.

                  The link in the other posting, http://www.topicscape.com/mindmaps/ has some examples.

                  The only thing I don't know is how to adapt mind maps to organic chemistry. (However you can use them for everything, including organising your study or your personal time, etc.)

                  Regards, Breen

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Tyler Sperry
                  ... Sheryl, there are lots of tips the folks here can offer -- and they might all help -- but where you might get the greatest benefits will depend on decoding
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 18 1:25 AM
                    skmackie wrote:
                    > Is there a way to improve test taking abilities. I just took a test in Organic Chemistry and my
                    > grade was okay but I want better than okay. The test was much longer than I anticipated, like
                    > 1.5 - 2 hours long. Much of what I marked incorrectly I knew but somehow it didn't make it
                    > to the page.
                    >

                    Sheryl, there are lots of tips the folks here can offer -- and they
                    might all help -- but where you might get the greatest benefits will
                    depend on decoding that last sentence above. Which is to say, is the
                    information you needed readily available outside of a test environment?
                    Sometimes when we say "I knew that" what we're really doing is
                    recognizing that something is familiar, not that we "knew" it in a
                    useful way (ie, without hints).

                    One way to check on that would be to get together with a friend in a
                    relaxed setting and while maintaining that relaxed feeling (watching a
                    television show, talking about other things over a meal, etc.), have
                    your friend read a couple of sample questions to you. That way you can
                    test if it's the stress of the test process that's the issue instead of
                    your study habits.

                    If it is the stress of the test environment, then doing drills as was
                    previously suggested would be a useful exercise to build up your mental
                    test muscles.

                    If you're looking for better study approaches, mind maps might make a
                    big difference. By putting your notes into a colorful, visual format,
                    you can make it faster and easier to review and also easier to remember
                    items. There's a good introduction to mind maps here:
                    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mindmapping>

                    You can also check your library for one of Tony Buzan's books such as
                    "Use Both Sides of Your Brain" or "The Mind Map Book". (The former has
                    somewhat dated scientific information, but the study info is solid and
                    it has a decent introduction to mindmapping.)

                    Cheers,
                    Tyler
                  • cmartin336@aol.com
                    One other recommendation: There is a software program, with which one can create concept maps and thereafter use this concept map to memorise the total content
                    Message 9 of 9 , Oct 18 1:34 AM
                      One other recommendation:

                      There is a software program, with which one can create concept maps and thereafter use this concept map to memorise the total content of this map.

                      This tool is excellent, to learn technical things and also natural sciences.

                      Here is the website:

                      www.recallplus.com

                      There are also many study tips on this website.

                      regards

                      Claus

                      -----Urspr√ľngliche Mitteilung-----
                      Von: tyler@...
                      An: wwbc@yahoogroups.com
                      Cc: skmackie@...
                      Verschickt: Mi., 18.Okt.2006, 10:25
                      Thema: Re: [wwbc] Test taking

                      skmackie wrote:

                      > Is there a way to improve test taking abilities. I just took a test in

                      Organic Chemistry and my

                      > grade was okay but I want better than okay. The test was much longer than I

                      anticipated, like

                      > 1.5 - 2 hours long. Much of what I marked incorrectly I knew but somehow it

                      didn't make it

                      > to the page.

                      >



                      Sheryl, there are lots of tips the folks here can offer -- and they

                      might all help -- but where you might get the greatest benefits will

                      depend on decoding that last sentence above. Which is to say, is the

                      information you needed readily available outside of a test environment?

                      Sometimes when we say "I knew that" what we're really doing is

                      recognizing that something is familiar, not that we "knew" it in a

                      useful way (ie, without hints).



                      One way to check on that would be to get together with a friend in a

                      relaxed setting and while maintaining that relaxed feeling (watching a

                      television show, talking about other things over a meal, etc.), have

                      your friend read a couple of sample questions to you. That way you can

                      test if it's the stress of the test process that's the issue instead of

                      your study habits.



                      If it is the stress of the test environment, then doing drills as was

                      previously suggested would be a useful exercise to build up your mental

                      test muscles.



                      If you're looking for better study approaches, mind maps might make a

                      big difference. By putting your notes into a colorful, visual format,

                      you can make it faster and easier to review and also easier to remember

                      items. There's a good introduction to mind maps here:

                      <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mindmapping>



                      You can also check your library for one of Tony Buzan's books such as

                      "Use Both Sides of Your Brain" or "The Mind Map Book". (The former has

                      somewhat dated scientific information, but the study info is solid and

                      it has a decent introduction to mindmapping.)



                      Cheers,

                      Tyler









                      Also see the collabarative Mentat Wiki at http://ludism.org/mentat for

                      information on how to become a better thinker.



                      Yahoo! Groups Links



                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wwbc/


                      mailto:wwbc-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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