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Re: to memorize chess games

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  • lacivert
    Claus You are right. Playing blindfold chess is a strong way to improve your memory, but it is difficult for beginners and intermediate players. Another good
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 26, 2006
      Claus

      You are right. Playing blindfold chess is a strong way to improve
      your memory, but it is difficult for beginners and intermediate
      players. Another good alternative is trying to solve problems on
      diagrams without using a chess board. This is good even for very
      beginners provided that they choose simple problems.

      Using mnenomic techniques without a solid heuristic and as well as a
      very deep understanding of chess are rather a waste of time.

      Cheers,
      Umut


      --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, cmartin336@... wrote:
      >
      Best practice would be, to play chess blindly against an opponent.
      I doubt, that there would be any mnemonic technique of any help.
      >
      > regards
      >
      > Claus
      >
    • sml_reinhard
      I do not think that playing blindfold chess does improve your overall memory at all. It may improve your chess memory, but what real use is this? To the second
      Message 2 of 10 , May 8, 2006
        I do not think that playing blindfold chess does improve your overall
        memory at all. It may improve your chess memory, but what real use is
        this?

        To the second point:
        I think that with some tweaking memory techniques can be used
        (Especially for blindfold chess, but for standard time controls, too)
        too great effect even by a beginner.
        A 'very deep understanding of the game' (Whatever that is, I myself am
        a 2200+ player (Internet only, but many titled players [Mostly FMs,
        but some IMs, too] have been beaten by me)and a deep understanding of
        whatsoever principles is kind of a myth. It is more of a feeling for
        the position.
        But memory techniques would be used to help the mind where it needs
        help: By guiding the short-term-memory through the mist an djungle of
        variations, to reproduce calculated variations and positions at the
        last branch etc... According to my experience the restriction in
        calculating ability is not because of spatio-visual ability (I can
        calculate one straight variation quite deep without problems) but
        because of the act of juggling with so many variations an
        subvariations. Here memory techniques, properly adapted, can really
        help. Of that I am sure.
        I am working on the matter. As a competitor in memory sports I have
        some experience in that regard (Effectiveness of techniques under time
        pressure etc...).

        Best regards,

        Simon

        --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, "lacivert" <lacivert@...> wrote:
        >
        > Claus
        >
        > You are right. Playing blindfold chess is a strong way to improve
        > your memory, but it is difficult for beginners and intermediate
        > players. Another good alternative is trying to solve problems on
        > diagrams without using a chess board. This is good even for very
        > beginners provided that they choose simple problems.
        >
        > Using mnenomic techniques without a solid heuristic and as well as a
        > very deep understanding of chess are rather a waste of time.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Umut
        >
        >
        > --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, cmartin336@ wrote:
        > >
        > Best practice would be, to play chess blindly against an opponent.
        > I doubt, that there would be any mnemonic technique of any help.
        > >
        > > regards
        > >
        > > Claus
        > >
        >
      • lacivert
        Simon, For one reason or more, I will try to give you a short but yet to- the-point answer: almost everything—-I say almost because it is better to err on
        Message 3 of 10 , May 17, 2006
          Simon,

          For one reason or more, I will try to give you a short but yet to-
          the-point answer: almost everything—-I say almost because it is
          better to err on the right side of things—-is a matter of scale.

          I am not trying to be ironic but give you a real answer. After
          thinking for a while if you still disagree with what I say, I will
          give you a detailed answer why I think as such.

          Cheers,
          Umut



          --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, "sml_reinhard" <sml.reinhard@...> wrote:
          >
          > I do not think that playing blindfold chess does improve your
          overall
          > memory at all. It may improve your chess memory, but what real use
          is
          > this?
          >
          > To the second point:
          > I think that with some tweaking memory techniques can be used
          > (Especially for blindfold chess, but for standard time controls,
          too)
          > too great effect even by a beginner.
          > A 'very deep understanding of the game' (Whatever that is, I
          myself am
          > a 2200+ player (Internet only, but many titled players [Mostly FMs,
          > but some IMs, too] have been beaten by me)and a deep understanding
          of
          > whatsoever principles is kind of a myth. It is more of a feeling
          for
          > the position.
          > But memory techniques would be used to help the mind where it needs
          > help: By guiding the short-term-memory through the mist an djungle
          of
          > variations, to reproduce calculated variations and positions at the
          > last branch etc... According to my experience the restriction in
          > calculating ability is not because of spatio-visual ability (I can
          > calculate one straight variation quite deep without problems) but
          > because of the act of juggling with so many variations an
          > subvariations. Here memory techniques, properly adapted, can really
          > help. Of that I am sure.
          > I am working on the matter. As a competitor in memory sports I have
          > some experience in that regard (Effectiveness of techniques under
          time
          > pressure etc...).
          >
          > Best regards,
          >
          > Simon
          >
          > --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, "lacivert" <lacivert@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Claus
          > >
          > > You are right. Playing blindfold chess is a strong way to
          improve
          > > your memory, but it is difficult for beginners and intermediate
          > > players. Another good alternative is trying to solve problems on
          > > diagrams without using a chess board. This is good even for very
          > > beginners provided that they choose simple problems.
          > >
          > > Using mnenomic techniques without a solid heuristic and as well
          as a
          > > very deep understanding of chess are rather a waste of time.
          > >
          > > Cheers,
          > > Umut
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, cmartin336@ wrote:
          > > >
          > > Best practice would be, to play chess blindly against an
          opponent.
          > > I doubt, that there would be any mnemonic technique of any help.
          > > >
          > > > regards
          > > >
          > > > Claus
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • elio perez
          What about using associations? imagine a play whatever like the DOG PLAy and watch yours pieces like a big dogs, something that facilite you see the position
          Message 4 of 10 , May 17, 2006
            What about using associations?
            imagine a play whatever like the DOG PLAy and watch
            yours pieces like a big dogs, something that facilite
            you see the position of the pieces over the board. Use
            hot names for better recal like (slave sex play?)

            --- lacivert <lacivert@...> wrote:

            > Simon,
            >
            > For one reason or more, I will try to give you a
            > short but yet to-
            > the-point answer: almost everything—-I say almost
            > because it is
            > better to err on the right side of things—-is a
            > matter of scale.
            >
            > I am not trying to be ironic but give you a real
            > answer. After
            > thinking for a while if you still disagree with what
            > I say, I will
            > give you a detailed answer why I think as such.
            >
            > Cheers,
            > Umut
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, "sml_reinhard"
            > <sml.reinhard@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > I do not think that playing blindfold chess does
            > improve your
            > overall
            > > memory at all. It may improve your chess memory,
            > but what real use
            > is
            > > this?
            > >
            > > To the second point:
            > > I think that with some tweaking memory techniques
            > can be used
            > > (Especially for blindfold chess, but for standard
            > time controls,
            > too)
            > > too great effect even by a beginner.
            > > A 'very deep understanding of the game' (Whatever
            > that is, I
            > myself am
            > > a 2200+ player (Internet only, but many titled
            > players [Mostly FMs,
            > > but some IMs, too] have been beaten by me)and a
            > deep understanding
            > of
            > > whatsoever principles is kind of a myth. It is
            > more of a feeling
            > for
            > > the position.
            > > But memory techniques would be used to help the
            > mind where it needs
            > > help: By guiding the short-term-memory through the
            > mist an djungle
            > of
            > > variations, to reproduce calculated variations and
            > positions at the
            > > last branch etc... According to my experience the
            > restriction in
            > > calculating ability is not because of
            > spatio-visual ability (I can
            > > calculate one straight variation quite deep
            > without problems) but
            > > because of the act of juggling with so many
            > variations an
            > > subvariations. Here memory techniques, properly
            > adapted, can really
            > > help. Of that I am sure.
            > > I am working on the matter. As a competitor in
            > memory sports I have
            > > some experience in that regard (Effectiveness of
            > techniques under
            > time
            > > pressure etc...).
            > >
            > > Best regards,
            > >
            > > Simon
            > >
            > > --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, "lacivert"
            > <lacivert@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Claus
            > > >
            > > > You are right. Playing blindfold chess is a
            > strong way to
            > improve
            > > > your memory, but it is difficult for beginners
            > and intermediate
            > > > players. Another good alternative is trying to
            > solve problems on
            > > > diagrams without using a chess board. This is
            > good even for very
            > > > beginners provided that they choose simple
            > problems.
            > > >
            > > > Using mnenomic techniques without a solid
            > heuristic and as well
            > as a
            > > > very deep understanding of chess are rather a
            > waste of time.
            > > >
            > > > Cheers,
            > > > Umut
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, cmartin336@ wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > Best practice would be, to play chess blindly
            > against an
            > opponent.
            > > > I doubt, that there would be any mnemonic
            > technique of any help.
            > > > >
            > > > > regards
            > > > >
            > > > > Claus
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >


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