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rapid input

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  • jwmeritt <JWMeritt@aol.com>
    I m looking around for methods of rapid (significantly faster than normal, whatever that is) methods of cerebrial input. Photoreading looks fast enough, but
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 9, 2002
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      I'm looking around for methods of rapid (significantly faster than
      normal, whatever that is) methods of cerebrial input. Photoreading
      looks fast enough, but there should be other methods. Yes, I know
      about the "Superlearning/accelerated learning" systems, but it looks
      like there is a bottleneck if you have to read it aloud first in order
      to record things for the memorization.

      Suggestions?
    • jwmeritt <JWMeritt@aol.com>
      ... order ... aside from Powerpoint presentations (automatic transition set at 1 second, slide show) or computer based training (know any free ones? Brings
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 10, 2002
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        --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, "jwmeritt <JWMeritt@a...>"
        <JWMeritt@a...> wrote:
        > I'm looking around for methods of rapid (significantly faster than
        > normal, whatever that is) methods of cerebrial input. Photoreading
        > looks fast enough, but there should be other methods. Yes, I know
        > about the "Superlearning/accelerated learning" systems, but it looks
        > like there is a bottleneck if you have to read it aloud first in
        order
        > to record things for the memorization.
        >
        > Suggestions?

        aside from Powerpoint presentations (automatic transition set at 1
        second, slide show) or computer based training (know any free ones?
        Brings back memories of Renyold's book Ability Quotient). What are
        opinions towards stereoreading
        (http://exploreit.net/stereoreading/index.htm)?

        Jim
      • klinger5757 <btemp@shaw.ca>
        ... looks like there is a bottleneck if you have to read it aloud first in order to record things for the memorization. ... bruno writes: Sorry, but I
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 23, 2002
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          --- <JWMeritt@a...> wrote:
          > I'm looking around for methods of rapid (significantly faster than
          > normal, whatever that is) methods of cerebrial input. Photoreading
          > looks fast enough, but there should be other methods. Yes, I know
          > about the "Superlearning/accelerated learning" systems, but it
          looks like there is a bottleneck if you have to read it aloud first
          in order to record things for the memorization.
          >
          > Suggestions?

          ------

          bruno writes:

          Sorry, but I personally don't believe there is such as thing as a
          rapid input method of learning. But let me elaborate.
          NEW INFORMATION:
          New information by its very nature will take a long time to
          assimilate. There can be no short cuts to clearly understanding
          terms and concepts. This takes time. If one is familiar with mind
          techniques, then this time can be shortened considerably. There are
          no secret methods and in the end hard work is inevitable.
          FAMILIAR INFORMATION:
          If one is already familiar with the information <SCHEMA> to be
          learned, then again learning time will be shortened. You have
          previously made associations [whether consciously/subconsiously]
          and you now have somewhat of a STRUCTURE upon which to understand and
          organize additional information. A good idea is to mind map what you
          already know <structure> to what you want to add <restructure> where
          possible. Doing this will always aid you in knowing [by way of
          analogy]on which shelves the books you want to access are on.
          MIND TECHNIQUES:
          The mind techniques mentioned earlier are the basic Journey, Locci,
          Story, etc {see: mindtools.com). Go to this site for more info on
          how to incorporate these visualizations into learning.
          ESOTERIC TECHNIQUES:
          Much in Superlearning is esoteric at best. Photoreading is in my
          opinion a scam if purported to be of benefit in the initial stages of
          learning. By learning I mean acutally INPUTTING information into
          memory. It can be of benefit as a sort of power surveying technique,
          however. Furthermore, it might be useful as a power REVIEW. That
          is to say once an item is learned THOROUGHLY <as in overlearning>, one
          can speed through flash cards for example based on time performance.
          2 seconds per item (on computerized flash cards) is the longest you
          want to take here. 1 second or faster means you've reached mastery
          level; at least by my standards. Photoreading or in this case
          photorecognition occurs at fractions of a second and under a second.
          RECOMMEND:
          I have read many books about how to study/learn as well as books on
          power reading, speed reading [as well as software reading programs].
          There is only one book I can heartily recommend which covers both
          better than anything else written. If you understand the concepts
          presented in this book [with mneumonic techniques] you will truly
          become a power learner. It's a lost little book sitting on a lonely
          shelf somewhere in a bookstore. Written by Howard Stephen Berg,
          entitled, "Super Reading Secrets"...speed reading tips of the world's
          fastest reader [which is to say speed COMPREHENDING tips].
          $5.99 USD. BTW don't get his course, this book is better!,

          bruno
        • Elliott <elliott.bignell@t-online.de>
          After my experiments last year, I m inclined to agree. There s an odd trance feeling when trying to read this way, and fragments of information seem to get
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 24, 2002
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            After my experiments last year, I'm inclined to agree. There's an
            odd "trance" feeling when trying to read this way, and fragments of
            information seem to get through - I sometimes had odd dreams after -
            but I couldn't identify any real benefit. "Activating" the
            information seems no different to ordinary range-reading, in
            retrospect. ANY method which causes your brain to skip details like
            punctuation is, I reckon, inherently dangerous. English, especially,
            can support large changes in meaning through subtle changes in
            punctuation and word order.

            Elliott

            --- In wwbc@yahoogroups.com, "klinger5757 <btemp@s...>" <btemp@s...>
            wrote:

            Photoreading is in my opinion a scam if purported to be of benefit in
            the initial stages of learning
          • cmartin336@aol.com
            Hi, there are now available software programs, which prepare an abstract from texts, so that one can quickly check, if a text is really worth to be read or
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 24, 2002
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              Hi,

              there are now available software programs, which prepare an abstract from
              texts, so that one can quickly check, if a text is really worth to be read
              or not.

              Has anybody already exprerience with such programs ?

              regards

              Claus


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Danny Thompson
              ... I think there may be something to it, but I dislike it for two reasons. I have had experience with this, and noticed some interesting things. A couple of
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 27, 2002
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                > Sorry, but I personally don't believe there is
                > such as thing as a
                > rapid input method of learning. But let me
                > elaborate.

                I think there may be something to it, but I dislike it
                for two reasons.

                I have had experience with this, and noticed some
                interesting things. A couple of times while
                "photoreading" I'd be cruising along then suddenly
                KNOW I's skipped a page, flip back and get them, then
                continue on.

                First, the whole premise of photreading is that you
                dump the info straight into the subconscious, which
                based on personal experience I think might actually
                work. However, dumping it straight into the
                subconscious with out the benefit of the fitler of
                conscious thought, the information siimply becomes a
                "TRUTH" to the subconscious.

                I much prefer to think about the information I learn.
                To decide whether or not I believe something, all of
                which happens at a conscious level, through active
                thought.

                Second, the result of learning something through
                "photoreading," ultimately is that not all of the
                information being available to the conscious mind.

                The material that is activated is information from the
                text that the subconscious feels has some relevance to
                you at that particular time. Anything else is not
                brought to your attention, not activated, but still
                absorbed by the subconscious.

                You know something is right at a gut level, but rarely
                are able to cite the source material. In the end, I
                used photoreading to read dictionaries and thesauruses
                to build vocabulary, but not for much else.

                =====
                __________________________________________________________
                If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing. --Ben Franklin
                __________________________________________________________

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              • Cabbot Sanders
                Good point you made, Danny! I feel the same way. ... From: Danny Thompson [mailto:daovinci@yahoo.com] Sent: Friday, December 27, 2002 9:18 AM To:
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 3, 2003
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                  Good point you made, Danny! I feel the same way.

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Danny Thompson [mailto:daovinci@...]
                  Sent: Friday, December 27, 2002 9:18 AM
                  To: wwbc@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [wwbc] Re: rapid input

                  > Sorry, but I personally don't believe there is
                  > such as thing as a
                  > rapid input method of learning. But let me
                  > elaborate.

                  I think there may be something to it, but I dislike it
                  for two reasons.

                  I have had experience with this, and noticed some
                  interesting things. A couple of times while
                  "photoreading" I'd be cruising along then suddenly
                  KNOW I's skipped a page, flip back and get them, then
                  continue on.

                  First, the whole premise of photreading is that you
                  dump the info straight into the subconscious, which
                  based on personal experience I think might actually
                  work. However, dumping it straight into the
                  subconscious with out the benefit of the fitler of
                  conscious thought, the information siimply becomes a
                  "TRUTH" to the subconscious.

                  I much prefer to think about the information I learn.
                  To decide whether or not I believe something, all of
                  which happens at a conscious level, through active
                  thought.

                  Second, the result of learning something through
                  "photoreading," ultimately is that not all of the
                  information being available to the conscious mind.

                  The material that is activated is information from the
                  text that the subconscious feels has some relevance to
                  you at that particular time. Anything else is not
                  brought to your attention, not activated, but still
                  absorbed by the subconscious.

                  You know something is right at a gut level, but rarely
                  are able to cite the source material. In the end, I
                  used photoreading to read dictionaries and thesauruses
                  to build vocabulary, but not for much else.

                  =====
                  __________________________________________________________
                  If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten,
                  either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing. --Ben
                  Franklin
                  __________________________________________________________

                  __________________________________________________
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                  Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now.
                  http://mailplus.yahoo.com


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