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Re: [wwbc] variation on the Journey method

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  • George Wade
    My journey would be by canoe or barge through some canals and along rivers through Europe. It might be necessary for me to undertake the trip to be able to use
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 8, 2002
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      My journey would be by canoe or barge through some canals and along
      rivers through Europe. It might be necessary for me to undertake
      the trip to be able to use it, or to get photos and slap them on a
      map the size of our living room wall.

      A journey by car or bus would be negative and by plane would be
      "zero" - no emotion.

      Even better would be a long sailing cruise. I just can't get
      imagination going this year; it must be time to go on a real
      cruise: strictly for the work of recording the jouney, of course. A
      journey of 10,000 stopping points. Hmmm.

      I did my first new foreign language lesson on Saturday. It is
      satisfyingly difficult and will be a nice challenge.

      George

      On Sunday, September 8, 2002, at 05:27 , johncoghlan69 wrote:

      > Fellow Members,
      >
      > I have just thought of an elegant variation of the Journey method.
      > Perhaps it has been written about already - as I doubt I'm the first
      > to think about this.
      >
      > Instead of imagining a road or whatever one is walking on, with
      > various sites along the road, one can do this: think of, say, ten
      > important cities you've visited or want to visit. Then in each city,
      > envision a rough map. Go clockwise from the West to the East then back
      > to the West. Visit, say, ten landmarks. Ten cities with ten pegs could
      > form the basis of an interesting system, especially if used with other
      > methods.
      >
      > For example, one could think of Paris. One could start with the Eiffel
      > Tower, go to the Place de la Concorde, go to the Louvre, then on to
      > the Champs Elysees or the Arc de Triomphe. After that, there could be
      > Place Pigalle and so on.
      >
      > As well, I'd like to know how people combine techniques to expand the
      > Majors or Journey system using a secondary or tertiary system. For
      > example, there is the SM3 system. I see each system as intermeshing
      > gears. For example, one could use the Dominic system for 1-100, the
      > Majors system for another list of 1-100, and the Journey system for a
      > third. Then meshing the three together, one could conceivably build a
      > system with 10,000 pegs. Have others tried such a thing? Is it
      > worthwhile? What is the best way of doing this?
      >
      > All the best,
      >
      > John (Ottawa, Canada)
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • jcwmbes
      Hi John Great ideas. I have used the major system (1-100) in seperate towns, and it is really easy to keep the hundreds seperate (easier than SEM3). Obviously
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 8, 2002
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        Hi John
        Great ideas.
        I have used the major system (1-100) in seperate towns, and it is
        really easy to keep the hundreds seperate (easier than SEM3).
        Obviously context is important, and the towns I used were ones I know
        well. This would probably still not be so good for speed memory, as
        there will be a greater risk of interference than the good old
        journey system.
        There must be many ways of making routes or pegs more scalable, so
        that once you have learned one, it can be used in different contexts
        without having to spend too much time preparing.
        I like your clockwise major city idea. At least by learning the
        system, one can have a mental tour of 100 well organised and
        interesting places.
        Regards
        JohnC




        --- In wwbc@y..., "johncoghlan69" <johncoghlan69@y...> wrote:
        > Fellow Members,
        >
        > I have just thought of an elegant variation of the Journey method.
        > Perhaps it has been written about already - as I doubt I'm the
        first
        > to think about this.
        >
        > Instead of imagining a road or whatever one is walking on, with
        > various sites along the road, one can do this: think of, say, ten
        > important cities you've visited or want to visit. Then in each
        city,
        > envision a rough map. Go clockwise from the West to the East then
        back
        > to the West. Visit, say, ten landmarks. Ten cities with ten pegs
        could
        > form the basis of an interesting system, especially if used with
        other
        > methods.
        >
        > For example, one could think of Paris. One could start with the
        Eiffel
        > Tower, go to the Place de la Concorde, go to the Louvre, then on to
        > the Champs Elysees or the Arc de Triomphe. After that, there could
        be
        > Place Pigalle and so on.
        >
        > As well, I'd like to know how people combine techniques to expand
        the
        > Majors or Journey system using a secondary or tertiary system. For
        > example, there is the SM3 system. I see each system as intermeshing
        > gears. For example, one could use the Dominic system for 1-100, the
        > Majors system for another list of 1-100, and the Journey system for
        a
        > third. Then meshing the three together, one could conceivably build
        a
        > system with 10,000 pegs. Have others tried such a thing? Is it
        > worthwhile? What is the best way of doing this?
        >
        > All the best,
        >
        > John (Ottawa, Canada)
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