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Imam Jamil Moved to Federal Custody

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  • World View
    THE PEACE AND JUSTICE FOUNDATION 11006 Veirs Mill Rd, STE L-15, PMB 298 Silver Spring, MD. 20902 19 Rajab 1428 AH (August 3, 2007) Assalaamu Alaikum (Greetings
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 8 1:01 PM
      THE PEACE AND JUSTICE FOUNDATION
      11006 Veirs Mill Rd, STE L-15, PMB 298
      Silver Spring, MD. 20902

      19 Rajab 1428 AH
      (August 3, 2007)

      Assalaamu Alaikum
      (Greetings of Peace):

      By now many of you receiving this have heard about the transfer of
      Imam Jamil Abullah Al-Amin, from the state run maximum security
      prison in Reidsville, Georgia, to federal custody. When Br. Issa
      Smith, a long time member of the National Ummah, the jama'at
      formerly led by Imam Jamil - and a long time friend and brother-in-
      Islam of this writer - called to inform me of the transfer, we both
      opined that it was probably for the better.

      Georgia officials capriciously labled Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin
      a "security threat to the institution," while admitting there had
      never been any incidents involving the Imam that would justify such
      a designation.

      This label, nevertheless, was used to justify keeping the Imam in a
      custodial state of 23 HOUR LOCKDOWN since his trial and conviction
      several years ago. In this custodial state he has not only been
      denied normal access to other huma beings, he has even been denied
      his right to the obligatory (for a Muslim male) congregational jumah
      salat (the Friday prayer service). In the opinion of many, these and
      other unnecessary impediments constituted both "cruel and unusual
      punishment" (even for a "convicted felon"); an unwarranted violation
      of Imam Jamil's constitutional rights!

      While Georgia State officials are loathe to admit this, Imam Jamil's
      transfer into federal custody comes as a result of the increasing
      public pressure that officials in Atlanta and Reidsville have been
      under. And this is why we believe the Imam's transfer may be a good
      thing. While he very well may end up being transfered much farther
      away from his family and lawyers, the onerous custodial conditions
      that he's been under may cease.

      Imam Jamil was reportedly transfered into federal custody on
      Wednesday morning. While his exact whereabouts are not known with
      certainty, he is believed to be somewhere in Oklahoma - probably at
      a federal diagnostic center, being put through a battery of tests
      and examinations, before being assigned to a federal prison. May
      ALLAH (swt) make it easy for him. Insha'Allah, we will keep our
      readers posted on any major developments, insha'Allah.

      *********************************************************************

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    • World View
      INMATE ONCE KNOWN AS H. RAP BROWN TRANSFERRED TO FEDERAL CUSTODY GREG BLUESTEIN Associated Press
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 19, 2007
        INMATE ONCE KNOWN AS H. RAP BROWN TRANSFERRED TO FEDERAL CUSTODY
        GREG BLUESTEIN
        Associated Press
        http://www.jacksonville.com/apnews/stories/080207/D8QOVTSG0.shtml


        ATLANTA - The 1960s black militant jailed for alegedly killing a
        deputy has been transferred into federal custody, Georgia corrections
        officials said Thursday.

        Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin, a 63-year-old once known as H. Rap Brown, was
        transferred after state officials decided his high profile status
        presented "unique issues" that the prison system could no longer
        handle, said spokeswoman Yolanda Thompson.

        "No specific incident served as a trigger," said Thompson. "We assess
        our inmate population daily, and we assess the needs of our inmates.
        This is an ongoing case, involving the best interest of our overall
        population. And he's a very high-profile inmate."

        Al-Amin is now waiting at the Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma,
        said Felicia Ponce, a Bureau of Prisons spokeswoman.

        He has been serving a life sentence without parole for the March 2002
        shooting death of Fulton County Sheriff's Deputy Ricky Kinchen, 38.
        The Georgia Supreme Court denied his request to overturn his
        conviction in May 2004.

        Kinchen was killed and his partner, Deputy Aldranon English, was
        wounded when they went to serve a Cobb County warrant to Al-Amin on
        March 16, 2000. The warrant was for failing to appear in court for
        charges of driving a stolen car and impersonating a police officer.
        Al-Amin was captured by U.S. marshals in Alabama four days after the
        shootings.

        His family and friends have claimed that state prison wardens had
        mistreated Al-Amin.

        In August 2005, a group of about of his supporters protested outside
        the headquarters of the Georgia Department of Corrections, claiming
        that Al-Amin was being subjected to solitary confinement
        23-hours-a-day and forced to submit to humiliating strip searches in
        front of female guards.

        A state prison spokesman had said Al-Amin was under lockdown because
        of his security risk level, which is based on an inmate's criminal
        history and behavior in prison, and denied that Al-Amin would be
        subjected to strip searches in front of female guards.

        Many still know Al-Amin as H. Rap Brown, a 1960s militant who served
        as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. In 1967,
        he characterized violence as a vital tool for blacks, "as American as
        cherry pie."

        Brown changed his name when he converted to the Dar-ul Islam movement
        in the 1970s while serving a five-year sentence for his role in a
        robbery that ended in a shootout with New York police.

        He later emerged as a leader of one of the nation's largest black
        Muslim groups, the National Ummah. The movement, which has formed 36
        mosques around the nation, is credited with revitalizing
        poverty-stricken pockets such as Atlanta's West End, where he owned a
        grocery store.

        *********************************************************************

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