Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Canadian citizen extradited to China could be put to death

Expand Messages
  • World View
    Canadian citizen extradited to China could be put to death Tue, 27 Jun 2006- CBC http://www.cbc.ca/story/world/national/2006/06/27/cdn-china.html Uzbekistan
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Canadian citizen extradited to China could be put to death
      Tue, 27 Jun 2006- CBC
      http://www.cbc.ca/story/world/national/2006/06/27/cdn-china.html


      Uzbekistan has extradited a Canadian citizen to China, where he faces
      a death sentence.

      Huseyincan Celil was sentenced to death in China for human rights work.

      The 37-year-old was sentenced in absentia for founding a political
      party to work on behalf of the Uighur people, a minority ethnic group
      in the Xinjiang province.

      A father of six, Celil fled China in the mid-1990s. He came to Canada
      in 2001 from Turkey as a refugee and became a Canadian citizen.

      The Burlington, Ont., resident has been held in an Uzbekistan jail
      since March. He was arrested in March while trying to renew his
      visitor's visa in the capital Tashkent.

      A spokesperson for Foreign Affairs said the department informed
      Celil's family of the development on Monday and is trying to confirm
      where Celil is being held.

      Celil and his wife have three children in Ontario and he has three
      more in China, a family friend told the Hamilton Spectator in April.

      The same friend said Celil was in Uzbekistan in an attempt to try to
      get his three children out of China, but didn't explain how.

      ===

      China: Rights Groups Accuse Beijing Of Suppressing Uyghurs,
      Smothering Islam
      By Grant Podelco
      http://www.rferl.org/featuresarticle/2005/04/a3857708-6fd0-4de1-843b-b3010171ae5e.html


      Two U.S.-based human rights groups are accusing China of misusing the
      country's laws to crack down on the Muslim Uyghur community, the
      largest non-Chinese ethnic minority in the region. In a joint report,
      Human Rights Watch and Human Rights in China say the systematic
      repression of religion continues in the western Xinjiang Autonomous
      Province as a matter of "considered state policy." In its first public
      reaction to the report, China says ethnic groups in Xinjiang enjoy all
      religious freedoms according to the constitution.

      "They don't want Islam to become an organizing force for political
      thinking," Adams said. "I think that's it in a nutshell. The fear is
      that people who have a heightened Islamic identity may start banding
      together. They may start thinking alike. This is not about radical
      Islam, although the Chinese government tries to make it out to be.
      This is about normal Islam, about normal religious identity."

      HRW says China has used the post-11 September 2001 environment to
      claim that individuals disseminating peaceful religious and cultural
      messages in Xinjiang are terrorists. It notes that, in 2002, Beijing
      successfully lobbied Washington to support its efforts to place the
      East Turkestan Islamic Movement on the United Nations' list of
      terrorist organizations.

      *********************************************************************

      WORLD VIEW NEWS SERVICE

      To subscribe to this group, send an email to:
      wvns-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

      NEWS ARCHIVE IS OPEN TO PUBLIC VIEW
      http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/wvns/
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.