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ARAR SUES CANADA FOR $400M

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    ARAR FAMILY SUES GOVERNMENT FOR $400M CBC, 4/22/04 http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2004/04/22/canada/arar040422 OTTAWA - Maher Arar and his family are suing the
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2, 2004
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      ARAR FAMILY SUES GOVERNMENT FOR $400M
      CBC, 4/22/04
      http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2004/04/22/canada/arar040422

      OTTAWA - Maher Arar and his family are suing the Canadian government
      for $400-million, according to the National Post.

      The suit claims authorities breached Arar's charter rights and were
      guilty of racism when they pursued an investigation into his alleged
      extremist links in 2002.

      The court filing contains several allegations, including negligence,
      negligent investigation, defamation, false imprisonment, assault and
      abuse of public office.

      Other parties named in the suit include CSIS, the RCMP and Foreign
      Affairs department officials in Syria and in New York.

      The family says the authorities employed illegal and unconstitutional
      means to conduct a biased investigation on the basis of unreliable
      information.

      A Syrian-born Canadian citizen, Arar is seeking $50 million in
      damages and $20 million in punitive damages, as well as unspecified
      special damages, interest and costs, the newspaper reported. Eleven
      family members including his wife, Monia Mazigh, are seeking $30
      million each in damages.

      Mazigh is running in the next federal election for the New Democrats
      in the riding of Ottawa South...

      ======================
      RIGHTS REPORT BLASTS CANADA
      Ottawa Sun, 4/15/04
      http://www.canoe.com

      Canada is on a list of countries believed to deport terror suspects
      to states that torture prisoners, violating international law.

      A study by Human Rights Watch cites the case of Canadian Maher Arar,
      who was tortured in Syria before being released without charge.

      Although Arar was deported by the U.S., it is alleged the Americans
      were acting on Canadian information.

      It concludes that diplomatic assurances -- where one country promises
      another it won't use torture on an extradited suspect -- have no
      value.

      LEGAL VIOLATION

      "The Arar case reinforces Human Rights Watch's concern that
      diplomatic assurances may be used to return persons suspected of
      having information about terrorism-related activities to countries
      where torture is routinely used, specifically to extract such
      information," reads the report.

      And that violates international law, the group concludes in a 39-page
      report titled Empty Promises: Diplomatic Assurances No Safeguard
      against Torture.

      Canada and other countries are increasingly using diplomatic
      assurances as a means to end-run the rule of law and basic human
      rights, said Riad Saloojee, executive director of the Canadian
      Council on American-Islamic Relations.

      "I don't think these diplomatic assurances mean much at all."

      ALSO SEE:

      ARAR CASE PUTS CANADA ON RIGHTS GROUP'S LIST
      Canadian Press, 4/15/04
      http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?
      pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1081980906782&call
      _pageid=968332188774&col=968350116467

      Canada is on a list of countries believed to deport terror suspects
      to states that torture prisoners, violating international law.

      A study by the worldwide advocacy group Human Rights Watch
      specifically cites the case of Canadian Maher Arar, who was tortured
      in Syria before being released without charge.

      Although Arar was deported to Syria by the United States, it is
      alleged the Americans were acting on information received from
      Canadian security and intelligence agencies and perhaps with their
      approval.

      It concludes that diplomatic assurances - where one country promises
      another that it will not use torture on an extradited suspect - have
      no value: "The Arar case reinforces Human Rights Watch's concern that
      diplomatic assurances may be used to return persons suspected of
      having information about terrorism-related activities to countries
      where torture is routinely used ... to extract such information."

      That violates international law, the group concludes in a 39-page
      report titled, Empty Promises: Diplomatic Assurances No Safeguard
      against Torture.

      Reached in Ottawa, Riad Saloojee, executive director of the Canadian
      Council on American-Islamic Relations, said, "I don't think these
      diplomatic assurances mean much ... We don't have to resort to
      illegal treatment or presuming people are guilty and we certainly
      don't have to resort to torture..."

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