Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Grounding my wind sensor mast

Expand Messages
  • William DePriest
    Hey everyone, I have searched and searched and searched the net for an answer to my question and I can t seem to find a good one. I have mounted my wired wind
    Message 1 of 15 , Jul 14 5:18 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hey everyone,

      I have searched and searched and searched the net for an answer to my question and I can't seem to find a good one.

      I have mounted my wired wind sensor to a 13ft galvanized steel pole and attached that to the deck on my house (as high as I can get without having to get on the roof of my townhouse.)  The height is about 19ft total.  This height is roughly 10-15ft BELOW my roof-line.  I have a satellite dish mounted on my roof and several large trees (over 150ft) near me.  My neighbor also has some sort of antenna mounted on his deck and just about every other house has metal deck furniture/umbrellas as well.

      My question is this... Is it necessary to ground the mast if it is not (by a long shot) the tallest object in the area?  Is it worth paying an electrician to properly ground it?  Does grounding it make it a more attractive target for lightning?  


      Thanks in advance to anyone who can help!
    • KNHBRIST1
      Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run in
      Message 2 of 15 , Jul 14 3:15 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a serial surge protector in line just in case.
        Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from complete console failures to fried serial ports.
        Steve

        --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hey everyone,
        >
        > I have searched and searched and searched the net for an answer to my
        > question and I can't seem to find a good one.
        >
        > I have mounted my wired wind sensor to a 13ft galvanized steel pole and
        > attached that to the deck on my house (as high as I can get without having
        > to get on the roof of my townhouse.) The height is about 19ft total. This
        > height is roughly 10-15ft BELOW my roof-line. I have a satellite dish
        > mounted on my roof and several large trees (over 150ft) near me. My
        > neighbor also has some sort of antenna mounted on his deck and just about
        > every other house has metal deck furniture/umbrellas as well.
        >
        > My question is this... Is it necessary to ground the mast if it is not (by
        > a long shot) the tallest object in the area? Is it worth paying an
        > electrician to properly ground it? Does grounding it make it a more
        > attractive target for lightning?
        >
        >
        > Thanks in advance to anyone who can help!
        >
      • William DePriest
        Thanks for the reply... I too have a serial surge protector, but running wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn t acceptable to
        Message 3 of 15 , Jul 14 3:59 PM
        • 0 Attachment

          Thanks for the reply...  I too have a serial surge protector, but running wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.

          I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went to Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in.  He said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at least bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.

          On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@...> wrote:

           

          Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a serial surge protector in line just in case.
          Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from complete console failures to fried serial ports.
          Steve



          --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey everyo...

        • KNHBRIST1
          Agreed, that is a long time to wait for updates from the console. My 2310 is about ever 2 minutes or 2.5 minutes. I have a Inspeed Vortex Wind sensor that is
          Message 4 of 15 , Jul 14 7:19 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Agreed, that is a long time to wait for updates from the console. My 2310 is about ever 2 minutes or 2.5 minutes. I have a Inspeed Vortex Wind sensor that is direct hard wired in to the computer, so I do get wind readings almost real time, so I do not miss any gusts at all.
            Really nice to watch the gauge in gusty conditions, forget what WUHU uses for the update rate for the Inspeed, but it is like watching a speedometer , it is that smooth and quick on updates for wind speed.
            Steve

            --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks for the reply... I too have a serial surge protector, but running
            > wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't
            > acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.
            >
            > I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went to
            > Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in. He
            > said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at least
            > bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.
            >
            > On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired
            > mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run
            > in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a
            > serial surge protector in line just in case.
            > Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from
            > complete console failures to fried serial ports.
            > Steve
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Hey everyo...
            >
          • flag_buff
            Hi William, If you are handy with a soldering iron, you CAN modify the WS2300 to send data WIRELESS at much greater rates (i.e. every 2.5 seconds). Here s a
            Message 5 of 15 , Jul 14 8:18 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi William,

              If you are handy with a soldering iron, you CAN modify the WS2300 to send data WIRELESS at much greater rates (i.e. every 2.5 seconds).  Here's a step-by-step article that you can follow.  Be sure to read the "Discuss" tab as some people have turned up some errors in the diagrams...

              http://www.wikihow.com/Modify-a-Lacrosse-Ws2300-for-Frequent-Wireless-Updates 

              I can now use "Rapid Update" and see my wind speeds AS they happen - not 0.2mph 2 minutes after the house-swaying gust!  ;-)

              ~ Jon G.


              --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@...> wrote:
              >
              > Agreed, that is a long time to wait for updates from the console. My 2310 is about ever 2 minutes or 2.5 minutes. I have a Inspeed Vortex Wind sensor that is direct hard wired in to the computer, so I do get wind readings almost real time, so I do not miss any gusts at all.
              > Really nice to watch the gauge in gusty conditions, forget what WUHU uses for the update rate for the Inspeed, but it is like watching a speedometer , it is that smooth and quick on updates for wind speed.
              > Steve
              >
              > --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest wdepriest@ wrote:
              > >
              > > Thanks for the reply... I too have a serial surge protector, but running
              > > wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't
              > > acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.
              > >
              > > I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went to
              > > Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in. He
              > > said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at least
              > > bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.
              > >
              > > On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" steve_03222@ wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired
              > > mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run
              > > in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a
              > > serial surge protector in line just in case.
              > > Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from
              > > complete console failures to fried serial ports.
              > > Steve
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@>
              > > wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Hey everyo...
              > >
              >
            • David Lipper
              I have faced the same dilemma, and opted to perform the 8-second hack as described here: http://www.lissproductions.org/wuhu_manual/lacrosse_23xx_wireless_mod
              Message 6 of 15 , Jul 14 8:31 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                I have faced the same dilemma, and opted to perform the 8-second hack as described here:
                http://www.lissproductions.org/wuhu_manual/lacrosse_23xx_wireless_mod

                I now have a WS-2300 operating wirelessly with frequent updates, albeit I have to change batteries more frequently (maybe 6-9 months).
                I am not that great with a soldering iron, so performing surgery on the main sensor board was uncomfortable, but it all worked.

                On 2010-07-14 18:59, William DePriest wrote:  

                Thanks for the reply...  I too have a serial surge protector, but running wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.

                I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went to Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in.  He said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at least bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.

                On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                 

                Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a serial surge protector in line just in case.
                Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from complete console failures to fried serial ports.
                Steve



              • Jon Golubiewski
                Hi David, I m glad the hack worked! I had translated the hack from an Italian link ( http://www.fabriziosalvadori.com/modifica%20ws2300.htm), then
                Message 7 of 15 , Jul 14 11:06 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi David,

                  I'm glad the hack worked!  I had translated the hack from an Italian link (http://www.fabriziosalvadori.com/modifica%20ws2300.htm), then photographed and made each step more verbose (as the original instructions were quite sparse). 

                  There is an error in step 14 of the Wiki article (photo "180px-ws2300_step7_b.jpg" from your article) of where the 100nF capacitor is connected.  Compare with the final photo:  http://www.wikihow.com/images/1/1b/Ws2300_bottoom_Finished_963.jpg

                  Several other discrepancies are pointed out in the discussion tab:
                  http://www.wikihow.com/Discussion:Modify-a-Lacrosse-Ws2300-for-Frequent-Wireless-Updates

                  I'll have to look it over and correct the images (I WISH I could remember the program I used to make those annotations with!), but I just wanted you (and anyone else following this) to be aware...  MAINLY, so you don't go bonkers trying to get it to work!  :-p

                  But, yes - I got it to work, you did, and evidently several others have as well!  But, I'm going to defer kudos to the original Italian author!  :-D

                  ~ Jon G.

                  On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 11:31 PM, David Lipper <glenvilleweather@...> wrote:
                   

                  I have faced the same dilemma, and opted to perform the 8-second hack as described here:
                  http://www.lissproductions.org/wuhu_manual/lacrosse_23xx_wireless_mod

                  I now have a WS-2300 operating wirelessly with frequent updates, albeit I have to change batteries more frequently (maybe 6-9 months).
                  I am not that great with a soldering iron, so performing surgery on the main sensor board was uncomfortable, but it all worked.



                  On 2010-07-14 18:59, William DePriest wrote:
                   

                  Thanks for the reply...  I too have a serial surge protector, but running wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.

                  I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went to Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in.  He said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at least bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.

                  On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@...> wrote:

                   

                  Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a serial surge protector in line just in case.
                  Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from complete console failures to fried serial ports.
                  Steve




                • William DePriest
                  Steve, You mentioned that you have lost equipment from a lightning strike 1/4mi away... Is that even with it being grounded?
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jul 15 4:25 AM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Steve, 

                    You mentioned that you have lost equipment from a lightning strike 1/4mi away... Is that even with it being grounded?

                    On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 10:19 PM, KNHBRIST1 <steve_03222@...> wrote:
                     

                    Agreed, that is a long time to wait for updates from the console. My 2310 is about ever 2 minutes or 2.5 minutes. I have a Inspeed Vortex Wind sensor that is direct hard wired in to the computer, so I do get wind readings almost real time, so I do not miss any gusts at all.
                    Really nice to watch the gauge in gusty conditions, forget what WUHU uses for the update rate for the Inspeed, but it is like watching a speedometer , it is that smooth and quick on updates for wind speed.


                    Steve

                    --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks for the reply... I too have a serial surge protector, but running
                    > wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't
                    > acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.
                    >
                    > I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went to
                    > Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in. He
                    > said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at least
                    > bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.
                    >
                    > On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired
                    > mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run
                    > in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a
                    > serial surge protector in line just in case.
                    > Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from
                    > complete console failures to fried serial ports.
                    > Steve
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hey everyo...
                    >


                  • William DePriest
                    Oh boy! I have soldered just once before, to modify a CAT5 cable, but this looks to be A LOT more complicated and precise. Are all the needed pieces
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jul 15 4:28 AM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Oh boy!  I have soldered just once before, to modify a CAT5 cable, but this looks to be A LOT more complicated and precise.  Are all the needed pieces (resistors, etc.) available at Radio Shack?  Perhaps I will buy another Thermo/Hygro sensor from Great Big Outlets to have as backup in case this modification goes wrong!

                      On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 11:18 PM, flag_buff <NH4x4Jeep@...> wrote:
                       

                      Hi William,

                      If you are handy with a soldering iron, you CAN modify the WS2300 to send data WIRELESS at much greater rates (i.e. every 2.5 seconds).  Here's a step-by-step article that you can follow.  Be sure to read the "Discuss" tab as some people have turned up some errors in the diagrams...

                      http://www.wikihow.com/Modify-a-Lacrosse-Ws2300-for-Frequent-Wireless-Updates 

                      I can now use "Rapid Update" and see my wind speeds AS they happen - not 0.2mph 2 minutes after the house-swaying gust!  ;-)

                      ~ Jon G.




                      --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Agreed, that is a long time to wait for updates from the console. My 2310 is about ever 2 minutes or 2.5 minutes. I have a Inspeed Vortex Wind sensor that is direct hard wired in to the computer, so I do get wind readings almost real time, so I do not miss any gusts at all.
                      > Really nice to watch the gauge in gusty conditions, forget what WUHU uses for the update rate for the Inspeed, but it is like watching a speedometer , it is that smooth and quick on updates for wind speed.
                      > Steve
                      >
                      > --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest wdepriest@ wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Thanks for the reply... I too have a serial surge protector, but running
                      > > wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't
                      > > acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.
                      > >
                      > > I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went to
                      > > Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in. He
                      > > said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at least
                      > > bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.
                      > >
                      > > On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" steve_03222@ wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired
                      > > mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run
                      > > in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a
                      > > serial surge protector in line just in case.
                      > > Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from
                      > > complete console failures to fried serial ports.
                      > > Steve
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@>
                      > > wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Hey everyo...
                      > >
                      >


                    • KNHBRIST1
                      I have a wooden mast. Steve
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jul 15 9:06 AM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I have a wooden mast.
                        Steve

                        --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, William DePriest <wdepriest@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Steve,
                        >
                        > You mentioned that you have lost equipment from a lightning strike 1/4mi
                        > away... Is that even with it being grounded?
                        >
                        > On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 10:19 PM, KNHBRIST1 <steve_03222@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Agreed, that is a long time to wait for updates from the console. My 2310
                        > > is about ever 2 minutes or 2.5 minutes. I have a Inspeed Vortex Wind sensor
                        > > that is direct hard wired in to the computer, so I do get wind readings
                        > > almost real time, so I do not miss any gusts at all.
                        > > Really nice to watch the gauge in gusty conditions, forget what WUHU uses
                        > > for the update rate for the Inspeed, but it is like watching a speedometer ,
                        > > it is that smooth and quick on updates for wind speed.
                        > >
                        > > Steve
                        > >
                        > > --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com<wuhu_software_group%40yahoogroups.com>,
                        > > William DePriest <wdepriest@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Thanks for the reply... I too have a serial surge protector, but running
                        > > > wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't
                        > > > acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.
                        > > >
                        > > > I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went
                        > > to
                        > > > Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in. He
                        > > > said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at
                        > > least
                        > > > bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.
                        > > >
                        > > > On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in
                        > > wired
                        > > > mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always
                        > > run
                        > > > in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a
                        > > > serial surge protector in line just in case.
                        > > > Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from
                        > > > complete console failures to fried serial ports.
                        > > > Steve
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com<wuhu_software_group%40yahoogroups.com>,
                        > > William DePriest <wdepriest@>
                        > > > wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Hey everyo...
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • John Liss
                        Thanks for the update Jon, I removed the bulk of the content from the page and just left the wiki url. I d rather have it pointing to a more recent source
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jul 15 11:36 AM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Thanks for the update Jon, I removed the bulk of the content from the page and just left the wiki url.
                          I'd rather have it pointing to a 'more recent source' than have users go down a wrong road.

                          -John

                          On 7/15/2010 12:06 AM, Jon Golubiewski wrote: Hi David,

                          I'm glad the hack worked!  I had translated the hack from an Italian link (http://www.fabriziosalvadori.com/modifica%20ws2300.htm), then photographed and made each step more verbose (as the original instructions were quite sparse). 

                          There is an error in step 14 of the Wiki article (photo "180px-ws2300_step7_b.jpg" from your article) of where the 100nF capacitor is connected.  Compare with the final photo:  http://www.wikihow.com/images/1/1b/Ws2300_bottoom_Finished_963.jpg

                          Several other discrepancies are pointed out in the discussion tab:
                          http://www.wikihow.com/Discussion:Modify-a-Lacrosse-Ws2300-for-Frequent-Wireless-Updates

                          I'll have to look it over and correct the images (I WISH I could remember the program I used to make those annotations with!), but I just wanted you (and anyone else following this) to be aware...  MAINLY, so you don't go bonkers trying to get it to work!  :-p

                          But, yes - I got it to work, you did, and evidently several others have as well!  But, I'm going to defer kudos to the original Italian author!  :-D

                          ~ Jon G.

                          On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 11:31 PM, David Lipper <glenvilleweather@...> wrote:
                           

                          I have faced the same dilemma, and opted to perform the 8-second hack as described here:
                          http://www.lissproductions.org/wuhu_manual/lacrosse_23xx_wireless_mod

                          I now have a WS-2300 operating wirelessly with frequent updates, albeit I have to change batteries more frequently (maybe 6-9 months).
                          I am not that great with a soldering iron, so performing surgery on the main sensor board was uncomfortable, but it all worked.



                          On 2010-07-14 18:59, William DePriest wrote:
                           

                          Thanks for the reply...  I too have a serial surge protector, but running wireless with the 2308 means updates every 5 mins or more, which isn't acceptable to me, especially in a gusty storm.

                          I talked with a handyman at work who recommended grounding it so I went to Lowes and got a 8 ft grounding rod, 4 awg copper wire and put it in.  He said I probably don't have to worry, but a ground like this would at least bleed off the static buildup which could attract a strike.

                          On Jul 14, 2010 6:16 PM, "KNHBRIST1" <steve_03222@...>wrote:

                           

                          Not an answer to your question, but a comment. The weather station in wired mode can be damaged by a lightning strike up to 1/4 mile away. I always run in wireless mode anytime there is a potential for lightning. I also put a serial surge protector in line just in case.
                          Many of us here have had damage by nearby lightning strikes ranging from complete console failures to fried serial ports.
                          Steve




                        • Mark Paul
                          I have had my lacrosse 2317 for a few years now and it is directly wired to the sensors via about 50 feet of extra phone cable to its outside location. It is
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jul 31 12:05 PM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I have had my lacrosse 2317 for a few years now and it is directly wired to the sensors via about 50 feet of extra phone cable to its outside location. It is connected to my computer with a USB serial converter. It seems that once a week or so WUHU will simply lose communication with the Main unit located right next to the computer and the only way to get it back up is to reset the computer, does anyone else have this problem. Also when there is a thunderstorm with a lot of lighting it seems to knock out communication between the Therm sensor and the main unit even though it is directly wired and I hate when that happens because then I have to completely reset the unit to get communications to resume and I lose all my data. Now that being said I tried to put a normal phone line surge protector in the line to stop and surges from coming up the line and into the computer USB or the 2317 main unit. When I did this the communications would never come through almost like the surge protector was blocking the data communication, does anyone have a setup like this where they were successful in adding some type of surge protection?
                          • kevbert002_5
                            I am starting to see this problem with a 2350 connected to the PC via the La Crosse supplied serial to USB adapter. What happens is that the unit seems to
                            Message 13 of 15 , Aug 1, 2010
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I am starting to see this problem with a 2350 connected to the PC via the La Crosse supplied serial to USB adapter.
                              What happens is that the unit seems to communicate with the PC fine for a few days. Then for no apparent reason the console stops communicating with the PC and no errors are displayed in the WUHU logs, yet the PC continues to run. I stop WUHU and then when I try to start WUHU again I get the message that the serial port is currently in use and so cannot connect. A reboot of the PC resolves the problem.

                              --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Paul" <mpbn80@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I have had my lacrosse 2317 for a few years now and it is directly wired to the sensors via about 50 feet of extra phone cable to its outside location. It is connected to my computer with a USB serial converter. It seems that once a week or so WUHU will simply lose communication with the Main unit located right next to the computer and the only way to get it back up is to reset the computer, does anyone else have this problem. Also when there is a thunderstorm with a lot of lighting it seems to knock out communication between the Therm sensor and the main unit even though it is directly wired and I hate when that happens because then I have to completely reset the unit to get communications to resume and I lose all my data. Now that being said I tried to put a normal phone line surge protector in the line to stop and surges from coming up the line and into the computer USB or the 2317 main unit. When I did this the communications would never come through almost like the surge protector was blocking the data communication, does anyone have a setup like this where they were successful in adding some type of surge protection?
                              >
                            • KNHBRIST1
                              I have tried a few different USB to Serial adapters and the only one I found that works error free is the IO Gear one. As for surge protectors I put an inline
                              Message 14 of 15 , Aug 1, 2010
                              • 0 Attachment
                                I have tried a few different USB to Serial adapters and the only one I found that works error free is the IO Gear one. As for surge protectors I put an inline serial surge protector at the computer and I have not had any problems with that blocking any communications.
                                Steve
                              • wuhu_software
                                USB adapters are generally unreliable. Assuming that you are using XP, I would recommend the one from IOGear available at newegg.com. IOGEAR GUC232A USB1.1 to
                                Message 15 of 15 , Aug 1, 2010
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  USB adapters are generally unreliable.  Assuming that you are using XP, I would recommend the one from IOGear available at newegg.com.

                                  IOGEAR GUC232A USB1.1 to Serial/ PDA Converter Cable 

                                  If you are using a newer OS like Windows 7, I would recommend a real serial port card. These are also available from Newegg.

                                  The telephone surge protector is not designed to be used with RS-232 communications. What you need is an inline serial surge protector.

                                  Serial Surge Protector 


                                  --- In wuhu_software_group@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Paul" <mpbn80@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I have had my lacrosse 2317 for a few years now and it is directly wired to the sensors via about 50 feet of extra phone cable to its outside location. It is connected to my computer with a USB serial converter. It seems that once a week or so WUHU will simply lose communication with the Main unit located right next to the computer and the only way to get it back up is to reset the computer, does anyone else have this problem. Also when there is a thunderstorm with a lot of lighting it seems to knock out communication between the Therm sensor and the main unit even though it is directly wired and I hate when that happens because then I have to completely reset the unit to get communications to resume and I lose all my data. Now that being said I tried to put a normal phone line surge protector in the line to stop and surges from coming up the line and into the computer USB or the 2317 main unit. When I did this the communications would never come through almost like the surge protector was blocking the data communication, does anyone have a setup like this where they were successful in adding some type of surge protection?
                                  >
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.