Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

NJ0W: Change of itinerary, plus some operating notes on grids

Expand Messages
  • Bill VanAlstyne W5WVO
    David, NJ0W, has asked me to publish this change in his trip-ending itinerary: He is going to skip the DN20/21 stop Wed PM/Thur AM, as it is redundant for DN20
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 4, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      David, NJ0W, has asked me to publish this change in his trip-ending itinerary:
       
      He is going to skip the DN20/21 stop Wed PM/Thur AM, as it is redundant for DN20 and both grids are on the Interstate, and thus are easily activated at some future time as needed without much advanced planning.

      New schedule:

      Mon PM/Tue AM DN01/02/11/12
      Tue PM/Wed AM DN00/01/10/11
      Wed PM/Thu AM DN10/20/DM19/29
      Thu PM/Fri AM DM17/18/27/28

      David needs some better luck getting to confluences in this part of the country, as he’s struck out the last three attempts due to locked gates and other man-made and natural barriers. His luck has to change!
       
      As has been the case thus far, when a confluence is discovered to be inaccessible, one pair of grids is activated from its boundary line during the evening, and the other pair the next morning. Where possible, this information will be posted on PJ at the beginning of the operating period, probably by David himself. But if David is offline (not on PJ), you must confirm where David is operating from by correctly decoding his grid locator string sent in his Tx2 or Tx3 message. For vertical grid pairs (e.g., DN00 and DN01), the string will comprise the block ID and the two grid numbers, south to north, without repeating the block ID. For example, the boundary between DN00 and DN01 is “DN0001”. The boundary between DM27 and DM28 is “DM2728”. 
       
      For horizontal grid pairs (e.g., DN00 and DN10), the string will comprise the block ID and the two grid numbers, west to east, without repeating the block ID. For example, the boundary between DN00 and DN10 is “DN0010”. The boundary between DM17 and DM27 is “DM1727”.  When a pair of contiguous grids fall across two different block IDs, the same rule is applied: that is, the block ID of the western grid square is transmitted, followed by the western grid number and the eastern grid number. The eastern grid’s block ID characters are NOT transmitted even though they are different. The operator must infer from reference to a map what the eastern block ID is and log it accordingly. For example, the boundary between DM92 and EM02 would be transmitted as “DM9202”.
       
      A confluence grid locator string will contain only one block ID and two grid numbers as well, despite the fact that four grids and possibly one, two, or four grid block IDs are being activated simultaneously. The expression of the four-grid array in this system assumes the southwest grid is first, the northwest grid second, the southeast third, and the northeast grid last. ONLY THE SOUTHWEST AND THE NORTHEAST GRID NUMBERS WILL BE ACTUALLY TRANSMITTED. For a worst-case example – where all four grid block IDs as well as all four grid numbers are different – the confluence of DL99, DM90, EL09, and EM00 would be transmitted as “DL9900”. Look up DL99 on a grid map and see that the grid diagonally to the northeast of DL99 is EM00, and you will know that David is on the confluence of those four grids. On the other hand, if you copy him sending “DL9909”, your inspection of the map will reveal that he did not make it to the confluence, activating only DL99 and EL09 from somewhere on the boundary of those two grids.
       
      That’s the code! Get it, learn it, and avoid disappointing QSL card screw-ups.
       
      As has also been the case thus far, David on some occasions will not have cell phone coverage and Internet connectivity. When this happens, certain operating practices need to be sensibly altered. In the main, when there is no PJ coordination-by-list happening, it is simply illogical to use single-tone shorthands for messages when several stations are all transmitting at the same time. Even through use of the DF parameter to try to identify which station is which, it is impossible to be certain at all times who you just heard. So, use common sense and don’t use STs when the frequency is crowded and random-operation conditions are in vogue. Your QSO might take a few minutes longer, but both you and David will be certain you had a clean QSO. It’s worth it.
       
      73 and a HUGE HEAP OF THANKS to David for making this very difficult Grid DXpedition a success despite the expected interruptions from Murphy – all of which have been dealt with expeditiously and with great aplomb by David. Well done!
       
      Bill W5WVO
       
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.