Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: New to WSJT and MS ops

Expand Messages
  • kd8atf
    Thanks all for your help dont have alot of money (18 here soon to be 19YRs old) but I like qrp and I like a challenge....it may not work at all but yet again i
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 3, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks all for your help dont have alot of money (18 here soon to be 19YRs old) but I like qrp and I like a challenge....it may not work at all but yet again i may get get a lucky shot once in get a qso never know HIHI! but I will look for a brick in add it to a very small wishlist for my bday once again tnx in 73

      --- In wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com, "Bill VanAlstyne W5WVO" <w5wvo@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Ryan,
      >
      > Here’s the thing that many newbies to meteor scatter (m/s) don’t understand: When you compare it to the “usual” propagation mode on 6m â€" sporadic-E â€" there is a huge difference in propagation efficiency. While very strong meteor trails can happen, they are very few and far between. Most of the meteor trails that hams use with the WSJT software are extremely weak â€" probably 95% of them, in fact. With a discone, you won’t even see signals propagated by these minimal trails because they are too weak. And unless you have a real high-gain yagi antenna, 5 watts on transmit is not going to put out enough of a signal to be heard by anybody, barring very unusual conditions.
      >
      > You CAN make contacts on 6 meters running 5 watts to a discone during a very strong sporadic-E opening; these occur frequently during the late spring and summer months. But m/s is a weaker-signal mode â€" not as weak a mode as moonbounce, but still pretty weak compared to sporadic-E. If you like running QRP to a minimal antenna, you will be able to make some contacts on 6 meters during strong summer openings, but your success on m/s will be nearly non-existent.
      >
      > Finally, if the “discone” you’re talking about is a purpose-built 6-meter discone, you may have some OK results with it (on sporadic-E only), but if, as I suspect, it is one of those wide-band discones such as are available at Radio Shack for VHF/UHF monitoring... That antenna just barely works on 6 meters. It is scarcely better than a dummy load. I know, because I used one when I first started out on 6 meters. I ran 100 watts into one and struggled to make maybe 70-80 contacts during June of 2003, before getting a yagi put up. I doubt I would have made more than a handful of contacts with it running 5 watts, though. Some, for sure; sporadic-E is amazing sometimes. But any meteor-scatter contact you make running 5 watts to a discone (which BTW is a vertically polarized antenna, and you should be running a horizontally polarized antenna for meteor scatter) would be a one-off event. Very rare.
      >
      > The minimum configuration for real success running meteor-scatter â€" and by that I mean being able to make contacts regularly with stations you see on Ping Jockey that are within a 1,000-mile range of you â€" is about 100 watts to a 3-element yagi up at least 20 feet. That would be considered a reasonable entry-level station for meteor scatter work. Add to that a small medium-power amplifier (like the TE Systems 0552G at 400 watts) and a 5-element yagi up 35-40 feet, and you have a pretty reasonable middle-of-the-road meteor-scatter station. Go to a kilowatt driving a 7-element yagi (or maybe a stacked pair of 5-elements, up at least 40 feet), and you start to find that meteor-scatter is really fun, because you can work just about everybody in your range, and you can start to try to work similarly-equipped big stations that are out near the maximum distance possible on meteor scatter (1,350 to 1,400+ miles).
      >
      > So here’s your progression, if you really want to do this:
      >
      > Step 1 is to lose the discone. Save it for monitoring airport tower traffic. If you can’t put up a yagi yet, put up a homemade dipole (ten feet long) and get it as high as you can. It will work much better than a discone for virtually everything. Given your location, you will want to orient it so it is broadside to the northeast and southwest, more or less. That will give you good coverage through the eastern US.
      >
      > Step 2 is to get some power going. If 5 watts is all your rig will generate on 6 meters, try to find a small “brick” amplifier that will get you up to at least 100 watts. There are lots of them on the market and on used equipment sites. (NOTE: If you are philosophically committed to running no more than 5 watts (QRP), then meteor scatter might not be for you.)
      >
      > Then get on Ping Jockey and try making some contacts with stations about 500-700 miles away. You will definitely have regular success!
      >
      > Step 3 is to get a yagi. Lots of places to find used ones, and there are modification papers around for making them better than they were originally designed. (I wrote one.) When buying a rotator, bite the bullet and get a good one. You will want to have it for when you upgrade to larger antennas â€" which you will. :-) Buying the smallest rotator (like a TV rotator) that will turn a 3-element yagi is a foolish economy in almost all cases. The smallest rotator I would consider recommending is the Yaesu G-450A. If possible, however, get something stronger. I’m partial to Yaesu rotators, but there are several other good brands.
      >
      > Hope this helps! Just trying to give you the real facts here, Ryan. Hope to see you on the rocks soon â€" but at your distance (1,552 miles) we would both have to be running some pretty big stuff and get really lucky. That distance is in world-record territory for meteor scatter. Probably not going to happen.
      >
      > 73,
      > Bill W5WVO
      > DM65qh New Mexico
      >
      >
      > From: Al
      > Sent: Monday, January 03, 2011 00:41
      > To: 'kd8atf' ; wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com ; Barry Garratt
      > Subject: Re: [wsjtgroup] New to WSJT and MS ops
      >
      >
      >
      > GE Ryan and the rest of the group:
      > I can only agree with Barry 110%!! Here I am at 25 feet, 100 watts into a loop - granted I am in an RV with lots of noise in an RV park, but even at your home QTH, you would want to 'upgrade' as Barry mentioned.
      > Best 73,
      > Al
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Barry Garratt
      > To: 'kd8atf' ; wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, January 02, 2011 3:01 PM
      > Subject: RE: [wsjtgroup] New to WSJT and MS ops
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Ryan,
      >
      >
      > Happy New Year and welcome to the group. IÂ'm sure youÂ'll get lots of answers to your question and not all will agree with mine. IÂ'll start with an analogy. Think of meteor scatter like fishing. You can go out with just some line and a bare hook with no bait and maybe youÂ'll get lucky but mostly youÂ'll come home empty handed. You can take some bait and depending on what fish are around youÂ'll do better. Or you can go out with a full tackle box so you can change lures or bait depending on what youÂ're fishing for.
      >
      >
      > With your current station you are like the guy with a bare hook. YouÂ'll be hard pressed most of the time to make any contacts. If you can get up say a 3 element yagi and up your power to maybe 50 watts or better yet 100 watts youÂ'll do so much better. YouÂ'll be amazed actually. To really have some fun and work the longer haul contacts youÂ'll want 300 watts or better and at least a 5 element yagi up as high as you can get it. But if you can only get the yagi up 20 ft. or so that will work just fine too. YouÂ're in a good location because there is a lot of activity in your area. That is to say the eastern part of the country. ItÂ's a whole different world out here where I am.
      >
      >
      > Hope this helps a bit and remember the main thing is to fun.
      >
      >
      > Barry KS7DX
      >
      > Las Vegas, NV DM26ic
      >
      >
      > From: wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com [mailto:wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kd8atf
      > Sent: Saturday, January 01, 2011 11:56 PM
      > To: wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [wsjtgroup] New to WSJT and MS ops
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello HNY all,
      >
      > Im new to worki ng with WSJT in general so may new some help here but I was wondering if an FT-817 at 5w to a discone would do the job on 6m MS I know it would be hard but from what I have read 6m is the easiest. I have have received one cq on fsk441. But anyway new op here to this mode so any help is welcomed lol.
      >
      > 73 de kd8atf
      > Fort Ashby WV FM09om
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.