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Re: [wsjtgroup] Re:Keeping PC clock on time

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  • Bill VanAlstyne W5WVO
    The BIOS (hardware) clock exists only to provide a last-ditch approximation of the correct time when the software RTC has been initialized due to rebooting.
    Message 1 of 26 , Apr 6 7:05 AM
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      The BIOS (hardware) clock exists only to provide a last-ditch approximation of the correct time when the software RTC has been initialized due to rebooting. That's the only time the hardware clock is read. It can be set manually through the BIOS user interface at boot time, but such setting is only an approximation, good to within a second or two at best. And there is no way to "keep it accurate" while the PC is running; it is not consulted during PC run-time in any case, so there is no need to.
       
      The software clock -- the clock displayed on your PC screen -- is potentially very accurate, and of course can be updated regularly with NTP and SNTP clients like D4 and others, as well as manually through the GUI. However, it is subject to the vagaries of CPU loading. If the computer is being asked to do way more simultaneously than it can do without losing RTC cycles, then it will lose RTC cycles. My experience with modern, fast machines using Intel multi-core processors loaded moderately with OS and user software suggests that the software RTC usually requires correction only at wide intervals -- days or even weeks. And then it's only a matter of a few hundred milliseconds at most. Load it up to the gills with simultaneously-running huge bloated applications and services, however, and that can change.
       
      If the software RTC is losing seconds a day, it's usually an indication that the CPU is (or was, for some period of time) way overloaded. Overloading produces its own problems, of course, but if you're willing to live on the edge, you can keep the RTC accurate with a utility such as D4 that resets the RTC every few minutes.
       
      Bill W5WVO
       

      Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2010 6:10 AM
      Subject: RE: [wsjtgroup] Re:Keeping PC clock on time

       

      If your BIOS is losing time you might try replacing the CMOS battery

      73 Matt
      W5LL

      -----Original Message-----
      From: wsjtgroup@yahoogrou ps.com [mailto:wsjtgroup@yahoogrou ps.com] On Behalf
      Of Bato, Andras
      Sent: Tuesday, April 06, 2010 6:54 AM
      To: wsjtgroup@yahoogrou ps.com
      Subject: [wsjtgroup] Re:Keeping PC clock on time

      Gentlemen,

      I have a problem.

      There's no software which would keep BIOS clock exact!

      Not long ago I took part in a contest with a DOS version of K1EA's CT
      logger but I had forgotten to
      check what the exact time was when the contest began..

      Severeal Qs of mine was cancelled, because of time differences!

      Does anyone have idea how to keep BIOS clock exact?

      gl de ha6nn
      Andras

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    • Joe Taylor
      Hello to all, I m home again, but not yet unpacked and re-organized... Many thanks to all stations we worked from KP4AO -- and our apologies to the many more
      Message 2 of 26 , Apr 20 7:56 AM
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        Hello to all,

        I'm home again, but not yet unpacked and re-organized...

        Many thanks to all stations we worked from KP4AO -- and our apologies to
        the many more who called without completing a QSO. The Arecibo
        telescope's short moon windows were frustrating for all, ourselves
        included.

        The "wall" of stations calling was simply incredible. A rough estimate
        suggests that we may have worked something like 20% of the callers
        potentially workable on SSB, 10% of those workable on CW, and only a few
        percent of those workable on JT65. I guess we'll have to do it again,
        in due course...

        From memory: our log shows nearly 240 completed QSOs with some 57 DXCC
        entities, in a total of 8 operating hours. Later, when I have the log
        in front of me and get caught up at home, I'll be able to report
        breakdowns of SSB, CW, and JT65B QSOs and say something about the QSO
        rates in each mode.

        We made recordings of the whole 432 MHz EME sub-band for for most of the
        time KP4AO was on the air. In due course it will be possible to "tune
        the band" carefully, many times, picking out callsigns. If/when this is
        done, I'll be happy to post a list of received callsigns.

        Here's a request for all:

        1. If you worked us with a setup significantly smaller than is normally
        required for EME, please send me a short note describing your antenna,
        receiver, and Tx power.

        2. If you copied us with a small setup, please send me details on your
        antenna and receiver.

        I know we worked and were heard by some pretty small setups, and I'd
        like to document some of them for a write-up in QST.

        Many thanks, and see you on the moon!

        -- 73, Joe, K1JT

        Members of the Arecibo Observatory Amateur Radio Club who constructed
        and operated the KP4AO station for this event:

        Angel, WP3R
        Pedro, NP4A
        Angel, WP4G
        Jim, WA3FET
        Joe, K1JT

        Additional guest operator: Pat, AA6EG
      • Joe Taylor
        Many thanks to all who sent reports of small antennas used to copy KP4AO, and QRP systems used to work us. In case you haven t seen them, be sure to check out
        Message 3 of 26 , Apr 22 6:58 AM
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          Many thanks to all who sent reports of small antennas used to copy
          KP4AO, and QRP systems used to work us.

          In case you haven't seen them, be sure to check out the OK1TEH reception
          of KP4AO in JT65B with a "rubber ducky" antenna at

          http://ok1teh.nagano.cz/emepic/kp4ao_at_ok1teh_eme.png

          and also the AF1T/W1MKY "pickle dipole" at the end of the excellent
          video at

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZutOfYLPIMY


          As I mentioned here before, we made recordings of the whole 432 MHz EME
          sub-band for much of the time KP4AO was on the air. With appropriate
          software (e.g., SpectraVue or Linrad) it's possible to "tune the band"
          in these recordings, picking out callsigns. I spent an hour doing this,
          last evening. Here's a sorted list of the CW calls I scribbled down as
          I listened:

          9A5SG 9H1BT AE6EQ DF1HF DF1VB DF3RL DJ1RPL DJ5BV DJ8MS DK2ZF
          DK7AN DK9TF DL3HXS DL5RDI DL6SH DL7FF E73O F2CT F5SE/P F6BCU
          G3LQR HB9BZA IK1HWG IK6EIW K1DS K1DY K2TXB K4RTS K6AAW K6TSK
          K7NT K7XC K7XQ KB8U KE7L KH7Y KL7HFQ LA0BY LU1C N2NQI N4SCS
          N8OL NA6MF OH3HLJ OH6NVQ OK1VVT OK1YK OK2GMO OK2UYZ OM5CM
          ON5OF PA2CHR PA3DOL RW6AG SF6X SM7GEP SP3YDE SP6ITF UR6IWZ
          UT5CW UT5JCW VE2JWH W1FKF W1MKY W2CNS W3EP W3KWH W3SZ W4DEX
          W7CS W7IY WA2ODO WA3DRC WA3XX WA9KRT WB2SIH WB6JZY WW1M YL2HA
          YL2OK YT2RA

          No double-checking has been done, and almost surely there are mistakes
          or typos in this hastily-assembled list. But you get the idea...

          I probably will not have time to do more of this in the next week or so.
          If anyone else is interested in listening to our recordings, perhaps
          to see if your signal is there, let me know and I will post them for
          public access. Fair warning: the files are *big*, about 1 GB each. And
          you'll need to know how (or learn how) to use SpectraVue, Linrad, or
          another such program.

          -- 73, Joe, K1JT
        • TdM LABs
          Publish them, Joe. I would like to play with them. Jeremy www.w7eme.org
          Message 4 of 26 , Apr 22 8:54 AM
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            Publish them, Joe. I would like to play with them.

            Jeremy
            www.w7eme.org

            Joe Taylor wrote:
            > Many thanks to all who sent reports of small antennas used to copy
            > KP4AO, and QRP systems used to work us.
            >
            > In case you haven't seen them, be sure to check out the OK1TEH reception
            > of KP4AO in JT65B with a "rubber ducky" antenna at
            >
            > http://ok1teh.nagano.cz/emepic/kp4ao_at_ok1teh_eme.png
            >
            > and also the AF1T/W1MKY "pickle dipole" at the end of the excellent
            > video at
            >
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZutOfYLPIMY
            >
            >
            > As I mentioned here before, we made recordings of the whole 432 MHz EME
            > sub-band for much of the time KP4AO was on the air. With appropriate
            > software (e.g., SpectraVue or Linrad) it's possible to "tune the band"
            > in these recordings, picking out callsigns. I spent an hour doing this,
            > last evening. Here's a sorted list of the CW calls I scribbled down as
            > I listened:
            >
            > 9A5SG 9H1BT AE6EQ DF1HF DF1VB DF3RL DJ1RPL DJ5BV DJ8MS DK2ZF
            > DK7AN DK9TF DL3HXS DL5RDI DL6SH DL7FF E73O F2CT F5SE/P F6BCU
            > G3LQR HB9BZA IK1HWG IK6EIW K1DS K1DY K2TXB K4RTS K6AAW K6TSK
            > K7NT K7XC K7XQ KB8U KE7L KH7Y KL7HFQ LA0BY LU1C N2NQI N4SCS
            > N8OL NA6MF OH3HLJ OH6NVQ OK1VVT OK1YK OK2GMO OK2UYZ OM5CM
            > ON5OF PA2CHR PA3DOL RW6AG SF6X SM7GEP SP3YDE SP6ITF UR6IWZ
            > UT5CW UT5JCW VE2JWH W1FKF W1MKY W2CNS W3EP W3KWH W3SZ W4DEX
            > W7CS W7IY WA2ODO WA3DRC WA3XX WA9KRT WB2SIH WB6JZY WW1M YL2HA
            > YL2OK YT2RA
            >
            > No double-checking has been done, and almost surely there are mistakes
            > or typos in this hastily-assembled list. But you get the idea...
            >
            > I probably will not have time to do more of this in the next week or so.
            > If anyone else is interested in listening to our recordings, perhaps
            > to see if your signal is there, let me know and I will post them for
            > public access. Fair warning: the files are *big*, about 1 GB each. And
            > you'll need to know how (or learn how) to use SpectraVue, Linrad, or
            > another such program.
            >
            > -- 73, Joe, K1JT
            >
            > _______________________________________________
            > Moon mailing list
            > Moon@...
            > http://www.moonbounce.info/mailman/listinfo/moon
            >
            > Please enter/update your standings:
            > http://www.vhf-dx.net/top.html
            >
            > When you decide to remain anonymous I may consider this unpolite and remove you from the list
            >
            >
          • K8TB
            Is there anyplace on the net that explains how the 430 line array antenna works? Bing/Google don t show much. I m intriguided with that antenna fed with
            Message 5 of 26 , Apr 22 3:10 PM
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              Is there anyplace on the 'net that explains how the 430 line array
              antenna works? Bing/Google don't show much. I'm intriguided with that
              antenna fed with waveguide!

              Thank you Tom K8TB
            • Joe Taylor
              For a good laugh, you might want to see what we were confronted with when we switched to JT65B on the final day of KP4AO EME operations:
              Message 6 of 26 , Apr 23 8:49 AM
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                For a good laugh, you might want to see what we were confronted with
                when we switched to JT65B on the final day of KP4AO EME operations:

                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/KP4AO_JT65B_1.png

                JT65 is supposed to be a weak-signal mode, and by WSJT standards most of
                these signals are anything but weak! We did our best to pick out and
                reply to some of the weaker ones, during the all-too-short time we
                allocated to JT65.

                I have not yet had time to go carefully through our JT65B recordings to
                decode all signals. To give you an idea of what's possible, here's what
                I decoded a few minutes ago, from a single one of the one-minute wave files:

                UTC Sync dB DT DF W Message KV?
                -------------------------------------------------------------------
                203300 0 -10 1.9 -640 4 # KP4AO G6HKS IO92 OOO 1 0
                203300 5 -11 2.4 -231 13 * KP4AO PA3DOL JO22 1 0
                203300 4 -12 1.8 -221 4 * KP4AO HA0HO KN07 1 0
                203300 1 -22 1.5 -3 18 * KP4AO SQ7DQX JO91 1 0
                203300 2 -16 2.0 366 7 * KP4AO SP1JPQ JO73 1 0

                203300 0 -18 1.8 471 9 * KP4AO W6OUU DN22 1 0
                203300 2 -4 1.6 822 4 * KP4AO AF6O DM14 1 0
                203300 4 -12 1.7 1690 3 * KP4AO DF6SM JN58 1 0
                203300 2 -14 1.8 1879 10 * KP4AO YL3HA KO26 1 0
                203300 0 -14 1.7 2030 3 * KP4AO NA6MF CM87 1 0

                203300 1 -17 4.3 2369 3 * KP4AO KR7O DM07 1 0
                203300 5 -10 1.7 2412 3 * KP4AO DJ8MS JO63 1 0
                203300 4 -8 1.7 2879 3 * KP4AO DH1WM JN49 1 0
                203300 3 -7 0.7 2935 3 * KP4AO LU1C GF05 1 0
                203300 2 -17 1.8 3261 1 * KP4AO W8PAT EN81 1 0

                203300 0 -13 2.0 3312 9 * KP4AO EB3DYS JN11 1 0
                203300 6 -15 2.2 3522 3 # KP4AO SK4AO JP70 OOO 1 0

                Note that with all this QRM, numbers listed for "Sync" and "dB" may not
                be reliable.


                I've received many requests for the wideband recordings from KP4AO, so a
                selection of them have now been posted on the WSJT web site at the
                following URLs:

                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/EME_1.wav 4/16 startup
                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/EME_2.wav 4/16 CW
                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/EME_3.wav 4/16 CW
                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/EME_4.wav 4/17 SSB
                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/EME_5.wav 4/17 SSB
                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/EME_6.wav 4/17 SSB
                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/EME_7.wav 4/17 CW
                http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/EME_8.wav 4/17 CW

                Files number 2-7 are all about 1 GB in size. File 1 is about 0.7 GB and
                file 8 only 41 MB. You may want to start with the shortest file,
                EME_8.wav, to get a feeling for what they all contain.

                With SpectraVue you should check "Invert Spectrum" on the "Wave File
                Input Setup" screen, and enter 432040000 in the "File Center Frequency"
                box. SpectraVue gives you date and time markers on the waterfall, so
                you can tell where you are (however, I've noticed that on 4/17 the times
                are certainly not correct). The data is blanked during KP4AO
                transmissions. The extremely strong KP4AO echo immediately follows each
                blanked interval.

                I prefer listening to these files with Linrad. This superb program is
                well worth the time required to learn how to use it effectively. If you
                already have some familiarity with the program, here's what you need to
                do to listen to the KP4AO files:

                1. Create a file "adwav" with a line naming each of the EME_?.wav files
                2. Start Linrad, select the desired file, enter "A" for weak-signal CW
                3. Answer "Y" to "Interpret as I/Q data?"
                4. Answer "Y" to "Invert frequency scale?"
                5. Enter "432.040" in the frequency control box

                Beyond these few hints to get you started, you're on your own with both
                SpectraVue and Linrad. I will appreciate it if you send me a list of
                all callsigns you hear in these recordings.

                With best wishes from the KP4AO gang,

                -- 73, Joe, K1JT
              • Joe Taylor
                I ve now found time to go through the 22 audio files we saved when using JT65B at KP4AO. As a reminder, here s what it looked like on our screen with WSJT set
                Message 7 of 26 , Apr 29 8:03 AM
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                  I've now found time to go through the 22 audio files we saved when using
                  JT65B at KP4AO. As a reminder, here's what it looked like on our screen
                  with WSJT set to its widest passband, about 4 kHz:

                  http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/KP4AO_JT65B_1.png

                  Going though these files carefully, one at a time, I decoded the
                  following 63 stations calling KP4AO. Completed QSOs are marked *. Most
                  stations were copied multiple times.

                  9A9T AE6EQ AF6O* CT1FFU DF3RL DF6SM* DH1WM DH4FAJ DJ8MS
                  DL5RDI EA2ASB EA3XU EA4CYQ* EB3DYS ES3RF* G4ZFJ* G6HKS
                  G8FJG HA0HO HB9DKM HB9DRI IK1FJI IK7EZN IV3CYT K3GAU
                  K5LA K6HLH K8SIX KI7JA KR7O KU7Z LU1C NA6MF N9XG* OE3SJA
                  OM3BC OY4TN OZ1MAX OZ2LD PA3CMC PA3DOL PY2BS RN3QRY S51WX*
                  SK4AO SM4LMV SP1JPQ SP3XBO SQ7DQX SV2DCD* SV2RM* UA4FRL* UT5JCW
                  W1FKF W1ICW* W7EME W7ID W8PAT W9GA WB2RVX WD4JHD WF1F*
                  YL2HA YL2OK* YL3HA* YO5PLD YU1EXY

                  These stations were found between about 432.045 and .049, where we
                  announced we would be lietening. Many more stations were calling
                  outside this frequency range, especially in the range 432.050 to .060,
                  our listening range for SSB and CW.


                  Here's a copy of the Linrad screen when listening to one of our wideband
                  recordings:

                  http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/KP4AO_Linrad.png

                  The scale at top is frequency in Hz above 432.000 MHz. Dark horizontal
                  strips in the upper waterfall show the KP4AO transmissions; bright spots
                  at about 44000 Hz after these are the KP4AO echo. Most stations calling
                  us are between 432.050 and 432.060, as requested. The very strong JT65
                  station at 432.064 is working someone else.

                  I've not yet listened gone through our wideband recordings to attempt
                  making a list of all callsigns heard on SSB and CW. My partial list
                  continues to grow, however; it now contains 202 callsigns (CW only);
                  here's the list:

                  9A1CAL 9A1CAW 9A1CMS 9A5AA 9A5SG 9A9T 9H1BT
                  AA5TB AE6EQ AF1T AF6RF CT1DMK DF0MU DF1HF
                  DF1VB DF3RL DG8YHH DG9BEW DG9YIH DJ1RPL
                  DJ2QV DJ5BV DJ6JJ DJ8MS DK2ZF DK5MB DK6AS
                  DK7AN DK9TF DL2HWA DL3HXS DL4HRM DL5MAE DL5RDI
                  DL6SH DL7FF DL8GAP DL9JY E73O EB3DYS F2CT
                  F5SE/P F6BCU F6FHP F8GBY F6KIF G3LQR G4ALH
                  G4CCH G4CEN G4NOK G4YTL GM4ISM GM4JJJ GW8IZR
                  HB9BZA I1NDP I2FHW IK1HWG IK6EIW K0TV K1DM
                  K1DS K1DY K1NY K2TXB K4RT K4RTS K5DOG K6AAW
                  K6TSK K7NT K7XC K7XQ K7XQ KA9A KB8U KE7L KH7Y
                  KL7HFQ LA0BY LU1C LU7DZ LZ1DX LZ1DP LZ1OA
                  N0OY N1VT N2NQI N4AO N4FRE N4GJV N4SCS N6DIQ
                  N6DIT N8OL NA6MF NU6S OE2CAL OE2WPO OE2XRM
                  OH2PO OH3A OH3HLJ OH4LA OH6NVQ OK1DST OK1KIR
                  OK1KPA OK1TDO OK1VVT OK1YK OK1ZHS OK2GMO
                  OK2JCZ OK2JNM OK2KJT OK2KOG OK2KVM OK2NMA
                  OK2PMS OK2TT OK2UYZ OK2VSO OK2VWX OK2ZI
                  OM1GX OM1TL OM3LQ OM5CM OM5LD ON5OF OZ1BCG
                  OZ5W PA2CHR PA3DOL PA3DZL RA3XX RW6AG S51ZO
                  S53RM S56X S57M SF6X SM3MQU SM4IVE SM6CEN
                  SM7GEP SM7SJR SP3YDE SP6ITF UN8L UR6IWZ UT2EG
                  UT5CW UT5JCW VE2DFO VE2JWH VE3KRP VE4MA W1FKF
                  W1JR W1KSZ W1MKY W2CNS W2WD W3EP W3KWH
                  W3SZ W4DEX W4RBO W4XP W4ZRZ W6AT W6FM W6YFK
                  W7CS W7IUV W7IY W7MEM W7OE W8TXT WA1ZMS
                  WA2ODO WA3DRC WA3GFZ WA3XX WA9KRT WB2SIH
                  WB6JZY WB7QBS WD5AGO WW1M YL2HA YL2OK YO2BCT
                  YO2IS YO2KDT YO2LAM YO2LCP YO7IV YT2RA YT5MW

                  There are surely some mistakes or typos here.


                  A total of 106 SSB QSOs, 122 CW QSOs, and 14 JT65B QSOs are in our log.
                  You can check to see if your call is in the log by going to
                  http://dx.qsl.net/logs/logs.html . QSL information is also posted there.

                  Once again, thanks to all who sent us reports on this most enjoyable
                  event! We're sorry we could not work you all in the time available!

                  -- 73, Joe, K1JT
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