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Re: [wsjtgroup] US Government uses MS propagation for remote sensors

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  • Larry
    Steve, Listened last night and this morning for a while. Can hear pings every few seconds and sounds almost like FSK441. This might prove to be a good
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 5, 2008
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      Steve,

      Listened last night and this morning for a while. Can hear pings every
      few seconds and sounds almost like FSK441. This might prove to be a good
      indicator of meteor activity. would be nice to have software that would
      at least decode the station ID/location.

      Larry

      Larry - W7IUV
      DN07dg
      http://w7iuv.com



      Steve McDonald wrote:
      > Larry - they are on 40.529.3. Likely they are really on 40.530 but I listen
      > to them with my rx in the usb mode. You can hear the master stations and the
      > slaves pinging data to each other on meteors nicely here in the PNW.
      >
      > Steve / VE7SL
      >
    • Dave hartzell
      I have a paper somewhere (that I can t find now) describing the SNOTEL network. Its actually quite interesting. From memory (and a little googling), I recall
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 5, 2008
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        I have a paper somewhere (that I can't find now) describing the SNOTEL
        network. Its actually quite interesting.

        From memory (and a little googling), I recall that the sensing nodes
        use omidirectional antennas and transmit about 100 watts, and the
        master nodes use 1500 watts via directional antennas to enable 2-way
        communications. I wonder what FEC and/or ACKs they need and how many
        repeats! I think they're using FSK as well. SNOTEL uses 40.530 and
        41.530 MHz, but I'm not sure which frequency is paired with the master
        nodes or the remote nodes.

        The paper to which I'm referring is a few years old, but describes
        about 5-6 meteor scatter networks. There might actually be other
        meteor burst networks in operation today. The military was very
        interested in the technology, and a few companies (Radyne?) have (or
        had) commercial products for it.

        There are a few books on meteor burst communications. Here is one
        that I have been trying to get, without the high price, of course!
        ;-)

        http://www.amazon.com/Meteor-Burst-Communications-Theory-Practice/dp/0471522120/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1199554868&sr=8-2

        A few months ago I posted a note to this group asking about setting up
        a beacon network, but there might already be such a thing that would
        be useful to us (SNOTEL)...

        73,
        Dave
        n0tgd

        On Jan 5, 2008 7:47 AM, Larry <larry@...> wrote:
        >

        > Steve,
        >
        > Listened last night and this morning for a while. Can hear pings every
        > few seconds and sounds almost like FSK441. This might prove to be a good
        > indicator of meteor activity. would be nice to have software that would
        > at least decode the station ID/location.
        >
        > Larry
        >
        >
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