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Calling Frequencies:

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  • Randy Tipton
    My thoughts: I will attempt to explain the use of the WSJT calling frequencies as I understand them and see how others think they should be used or how they
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 14, 2006
      My thoughts:

      I will attempt to explain the use of the WSJT calling frequencies as I
      understand them and see how others think they should be used or how they
      presently use them for random hour, routine use and special contests.

      First of all let me state that individual stations can and will use them
      differently but it would seem there should be a "best practices" that is
      widely used.

      The recognized calling frequencies in NA are 50.260 and 144.140 MHz.
      Stations who use other frequencies for calling limit their listening
      audience.

      During Random Hour, most stations choose to use the "simplex" method. This
      is the logical method since the RH session is designed to provide users with
      the maximum number of pings to copy during the hour. However the offset
      method is also popular and many chose to use it during the RH period. The
      Simplex Method does require the use of "Random Hour Messages" or total
      confusion results from the use of messages TX 3 - TX 5. The RH messages or
      simply appended on the fly in the panes for TX3 - TX5. The appended message
      is some form of the prefix or suffix of the station being called.

      Example: If WA5UFH is working N9EGT messages from WA5UFH to N9EGT would look
      like: EGT R26 or EGT R27 or EGT RRR or EGT 73. Now N9EGT know without a
      doubt when receiving EGT RRR it is intended for his station and the contact
      is complete.

      If a contest where grids are exchanged UFH REL19 would be used for my
      report.

      If QRM is a problem users can call using the "Offset Method" to remove
      themselves from the calling frequency during contacts. Also QRM issues are
      addressed in the RH manual.

      For most other use of the calling frequencies the off-set method of calling
      is probably better used than simplex in my opinion. This method in NA uses
      two standards.

      Example: Where WA5UFH is calling CQ on 50.260 MHz and listening on 50.275
      CQU15 WA5UFH or CQ 275 WA5UFH

      Note: If I was looking for contacts on 50.245 I would use CQD15 or CQ .245

      I prefer to use the CQ XXX WA5UFH with JT6M mode and the Up|Dn with FSK441.
      (my personal preference)

      The advantage of using the "Off-set" method is "Sh Msg" can be used with
      more confidence and the calling frequency is left open during the contact
      process. The use of the Sh message will speed up the contact and that is
      always nice. During contests I feel like the off-set method is probably best
      however if nobody answers your calls for a period of time, a simplex call
      might just reward you with a contact.

      Stations with a "Birdie" on the call frequency will find the "off-set"
      method a nice solution.

      I have no problems with stations using the simplex methods outside of RH and
      will answering simplex cq's. What does annoy me is hearing Sh / Non Sh
      messages used because I don't know who they are attended for. Several times
      lately I have answered stations on 50.260 only to copy a RRR or R26 and not
      know if it was intended for my station. Of course sometimes you can figure
      it out provided it fits what you were expecting to hear or by comparing the
      DF etc. However this is not necessary if RH messages were used. I do think
      we should all attempt to use "Random Hour Messages" if operating simplex on
      the calling frequency or we find our sked frequency suddenly occupied.

      This note was intended to generate a friendly discussion. How do you use the
      calling frequencies?

      Tip (WA5UFH)
    • Bryce Ofstie
      I m inclined to agree that, on the calling frequencies, it would be good etiquette to use the Random Hour message format at all times. Essentially meaning no
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 15, 2006
        I'm inclined to agree that, on the calling frequencies, it would be good
        etiquette to use the Random Hour message format at all times. Essentially
        meaning no Short Hand messages on the calling frequencies. I think it is
        easier to determine 'who' from DF if there are only a couple others on
        frequency, not so easy (or accurate) when there are a dozen. So the outcome
        of packing the band full of signals may lead to the elimination of the Short
        Hand message.

        I use simplex during Random Hours specifically because I am interested in
        maximizing the number I hear as well as the number I work. Outside of
        Random Hour, especially during contests when things may be crowded, I am
        more likely to use offsets or schedules because I'm looking for the contact
        rather than who else is on frequency. I'm also more likely ,at any time, to
        use offsets on 2m than on 6m. I guess my logic is that I'm not going to
        miss hearing as many (because there are fewer to be heard) and it typically
        takes longer to complete on 2m so why not move off to a spot where I can be
        sure of who is answering on the first ping, rather than second guessing
        myself and double checking with 2 or 3 pings before I switch messages.

        My 2 cents.

        73,
        Bryce, KI0LE

        http://www.cpinternet.com/~ki0le/
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