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Meteor Scatter and vertical polarization

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  • Les Rayburn
    Assuming that most folks who run WSJT Meteor Scatter run horizontal polarization, would there be a penalty to using a vertically polarized 2 Meter antenna,
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2014
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      Assuming that most folks who run WSJT Meteor Scatter run horizontal
      polarization, would there be a penalty to using a vertically polarized 2
      Meter antenna, specifically for meteor propagation? I know that I'd lose
      up to 20db using terrestrial modes like GW or Tropo...but does that
      still apply to meteors?


      --
      --
      73,

      Les Rayburn, N1LF
      121 Mayfair Park
      Maylene, AL 35114
      EM63nf

      6M VUCC #1712
      AMSAT #38965
      Grid Bandits #222
      Southeastern VHF Society
      Central States VHF Society Life Member
      Six Club #2484

      Active on 6 Meters thru 1296, 10GHz & Light
    • tony everhardt
      Until I finish building my eme station I m willing to try some vertical scatter too. It s all I have right now. 4x13B2 (52 elements). My schedule is very
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2014
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        Until I finish building my eme station I'm willing to try some vertical scatter too. It's all I have right now. 4x13B2 (52 elements). My schedule is very limited but I am willing.

        N8WAC


        On Sunday, June 1, 2014 10:24 AM, "Les Rayburn les@... [wsjtgroup]" <wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


         
        Assuming that most folks who run WSJT Meteor Scatter run horizontal
        polarization, would there be a penalty to using a vertically polarized 2
        Meter antenna, specifically for meteor propagation? I know that I'd lose
        up to 20db using terrestrial modes like GW or Tropo...but does that
        still apply to meteors?

        --
        --
        73,

        Les Rayburn, N1LF
        121 Mayfair Park
        Maylene, AL 35114
        EM63nf

        6M VUCC #1712
        AMSAT #38965
        Grid Bandits #222
        Southeastern VHF Society
        Central States VHF Society Life Member
        Six Club #2484

        Active on 6 Meters thru 1296, 10GHz & Light



      • Alexandre Moleiro
        You are reflecting signals not on the meteors themselves but on the ionized trail, so I guess it s like E-Skip. Polarization gets changed, rotates, etc. So you
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 1, 2014
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          You are reflecting signals not on the meteors themselves but on the ionized trail, so I guess it's like E-Skip. Polarization gets changed, rotates, etc. So you should be OK as long as you have enough gain.

          73 de Alex - CT1GVN


          On Sunday, June 1, 2014 3:24 PM, "Les Rayburn les@... [wsjtgroup]" <wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


           
          Assuming that most folks who run WSJT Meteor Scatter run horizontal
          polarization, would there be a penalty to using a vertically polarized 2
          Meter antenna, specifically for meteor propagation? I know that I'd lose
          up to 20db using terrestrial modes like GW or Tropo...but does that
          still apply to meteors?

          --
          --
          73,

          Les Rayburn, N1LF
          121 Mayfair Park
          Maylene, AL 35114
          EM63nf

          6M VUCC #1712
          AMSAT #38965
          Grid Bandits #222
          Southeastern VHF Society
          Central States VHF Society Life Member
          Six Club #2484

          Active on 6 Meters thru 1296, 10GHz & Light



        • Lance Collister, W7GJ
          Hello Les, One of the reasons that horizontally polarized antennas are the norm is because you get approximately 3 dB more ground gain with a horizontally
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 1, 2014
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            Hello Les,

            One of the reasons that horizontally polarized antennas are the norm is because you
            get approximately 3 dB more ground gain with a horizontally polarized antenna, and
            that main ground gain lobe is lower in elevation than with a single vertically
            polarized yagi. For the longer distances, you really need the lowest angle of
            radiation you can make, which means putting up a horizontally polarized antenna as
            high as you can.

            I know some meteor scatter people insist that they have good success by slightly
            elevating their yagis to point up at 5 to 15 degrees elevation, which does reduce
            local noise reception and provide a broader antenna lobe with closer to the free
            space gain of the yagi. However, for the more distant contacts, you are always
            better off with the antenna aimed at the horizon so you have the lowest lobe, and
            also the most extra ground gain. For closer contacts, the meteor paths will be
            higher, usually stronger, and well covered by the several higher elevation ground
            gain lobes created by the antenna being aimed at the horizon.

            As far as a mismatch on polarization on meteor scatter signals themselves, the
            polarization changes very quickly. I have not watched it on 2m, but on I have seen
            it on 6m, and the FSK441 waterfall screen is a great place to watch the fading during
            longer meteor bursts. Although usually difficult to HEAR (especially on a SSB or CW
            signal), you can readily SEE the very rapid fluctuations in signal strength on a
            transmission of constant signal strength (such as an FSK441 transmission). So, the
            rapidly changing polarization provides ample opportunity for reception of messages by
            a linearly polarized yagi.

            GL and VY 73, Lance


            On 6/1/2014 2:24 PM, Les Rayburn les@... [wsjtgroup] wrote:
            > Assuming that most folks who run WSJT Meteor Scatter run horizontal
            > polarization, would there be a penalty to using a vertically polarized 2
            > Meter antenna, specifically for meteor propagation? I know that I'd lose
            > up to 20db using terrestrial modes like GW or Tropo...but does that
            > still apply to meteors?
            >
            >


            --
            Lance Collister, W7GJ
            (ex WA3GPL, WA1JXN, WA1JXN/C6A, ZF2OC/ZF8, E51SIX, 3D2LR, 5W0GJ, E6M, TX5K)
            P.O. Box 73
            Frenchtown, MT 59834-0073
            USA
            TEL: (406) 626-5728
            QTH: DN27ub
            URL: http://www.bigskyspaces.com/w7gj
            Skype: lanceW7GJ
            2m DXCC #11/6m DXCC #815

            Interested in 6m EME? Ask me about subscribing to the Magic Band EME
            email group, or just fill in the request box at the bottom of my web
            page (above)!
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