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5147Re: [wsjtgroup] Clock sync

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  • Randy Tipton
    Sep 4, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I used to run D4 with my old XP Dell PC. I needed to have the time updated
      every 5 minutes in order to have the correct time.

      After changing to "Windows Vista" I no longer use D4. I have the operating
      system reset my clock every 4 hours. The new PC keeps very accurate time.
      (It is a Dell also but much better than the old one) The better clock
      probably not a function of the operating system???

      For information on how to set up the paramemeters using windows Vista, see
      this link...
      http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/dealing-with-windows-vista-time-sync-problems/

      Vista default is 7 days. I suggest following the directions and setting the
      time sync update interval to every hour. If not often enough, then adjust as
      needed. I no longer use D4 thus one less application open!

      Works for me. XP automatic time update was a weak link, Vista much better!

      Tip
      WA5UFH

      From: "Charles Miller" <n6kw@...>
      To: "Bill W5WVO" <w5wvo@...>
      Cc: <mike.kc9doa@...>; <wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2008 2:40 PM
      Subject: Re: [wsjtgroup] Clock sync


      > If you're using Dimension 4 or similar time-setting software,
      > you need to disable the Windows time-set anyway. They don't play
      > well together.
      >
      > 73, Chuck N6KW
      >
      > Bill W5WVO wrote:
      >> Here's something I just ran across on SmartComputing.com, which I
      >> subscribe to:
      >>
      >> "/WinXP automatically sets your clock on a weekly basis.* *Please note,
      >> however, that some computers with unusual hardware configurations lose
      >> time if you enable automatic synchronization. If your PC loses more than
      >> five minutes a day, Microsoft recommends disabling this feature/."
      >>
      >> If you are running WinXP (or Vista, presumably, though I don't know),
      >> you might want to check and see if you have automatic
      >> time synchronization enabled, and if so, turn it off.
      >>
      >> Bill W5WVO
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> ----- Original Message -----
      >> *From:* Bill W5WVO <mailto:w5wvo@...>
      >> *To:* mike.kc9doa@... <mailto:mike.kc9doa@...> ;
      >> wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com <mailto:wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com>
      >> *Sent:* Tuesday, September 02, 2008 5:19 PM
      >> *Subject:* Re: [wsjtgroup] Clock sync
      >>
      >> The hardware real-time clock (RTC) on your motherboard is basically
      >> the equivalent of a cheap battery-operated wristwatch, nowadays all
      >> self-contained in a small module, or even embedded in the
      >> motherboard chipset. Your computer reads the time from the hardware
      >> RTC when it is booted up, and based on this reading, it starts a
      >> software RTC service that runs as long as the computer OS is
      >> running. The hardware RTC is normally not consulted again until
      >> reboot.
      >>
      >> This software RTC that displays time on your desktop is actually a
      >> Windows OS service that depends upon the regularity of a BIOS
      >> interrupt. As you might imagine, the "regularity" of an interrupt
      >> occuring (and being promptly handled) could certainly be affected by
      >> any number of factors in the computer's run-time environment.
      >>
      >> If your clock is losing a lot of time WHILE THE COMPUTER IS RUNNING,
      >> then there are probably some processes you have invoked that are
      >> slowing down the clock.
      >> It could be that your CPU is loaded up to the gills much of the time
      >> by all the stuff you are running simultaneously. If that's the
      >> problem, you need to unburden it by closing any unnecessary
      >> apps/processes/services. Or maybe it's just time to upgrade your
      >> computer to something a lot faster and more capable, something that
      >> can keep up with all the stuff you're wanting it to do at the same
      >> time. :-)
      >>
      >> There is actually a fair amount of stuff available online about
      >> this. Google "RTC losing time" or similar, and do some research.
      >>
      >> Bill W5VWO
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> ----- Original Message -----
      >> *From:* Mike Miller <mailto:mike.kc9doa@...>
      >> *To:* wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com
      >> <mailto:wsjtgroup@yahoogroups.com>
      >> *Sent:* Tuesday, September 02, 2008 4:04 PM
      >> *Subject:* [wsjtgroup] Clock sync
      >>
      >> My computer's clock loses about .175 seconds per minute. Is this
      >> more than normal for a PC?
      >>
      >> I have Dimension 4 correcting the time every 2 minutes but this
      >> seems like an unnecessary load on the time server. Is there a
      >> way to reduce the clock error? Is there a program that can
      >> apply a correction factor locally and reduce the need check the
      >> time server?
      >>
      >> Mike kc9doa
      >>
      >>
      >
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