Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [wsbn] Need second opinions

Expand Messages
  • Robin Nicholoff
    Re Cooper s Hawks: On at least 4 float trips over the past decade on the Yampa River, a particular Mrs. Cooper has established her nest at Mather Hole. Each
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 24, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Re Cooper's Hawks: On at least 4 float trips over the past decade on the Yampa River, a particular Mrs. Cooper has established her nest at Mather Hole. Each year the nest was in a slightly different location, but always within a 50 yard radius in Box Elder trees. In 2010 around June 27, she had 2 or 3 white bundles of joy in the nest. I was there around July 17 of 2011, and she had relocated her nest to a tree in the middle of our normal river kitchen area (forcing us to relocate our kitchen). Curiously, there were a couple of juveniles hanging around, sometimes on the nest, as well as the Mrs. I couldn't figure out if these were the previous year's chicks, or if she had fledged new ones, which, assuming similar hatch times each year, would have grown radically over a 3 week period.

      Any ideas?

      Robin Nicholoff
      Hotchkiss


      On Jun 23, 2013, at 6:31 PM, Jim Le Fevre <jimlef@...> wrote:

      > While working on the Gunnison National Forest I did find quite a few
      > Sharpies nesting in aspen. In one territory I found an additional 3
      > alternative nests within a 300 meter radius (all the nests were found on
      > relatively flat terrain so I am confident that they belonged to the same
      > pair). Coop's I have found most often in the micro-climate of drainages
      > but also at elevation in mixed aspen/conifer stands. One other note
      > about goshawk nesting; most of the gos nests I monitored were at a
      > similar elevation as the nest Dennis found and the hatching date
      > coincided with around June 12-June 20 in most years.
      >
      > Jim Le Fevre
      >
      > Terry Meyers wrote:
      >
      >>
      >> An interesting discussion, and I am awaiting the outcome from Dennis.
      >>
      >> My first thought was either COHA or a nesting sub-adult female GOHA.
      >> Although the scale is difficult to discern, the nest stick size seems
      >> too large for SSHA. And in 8 years of extensive, summer-long raptor
      >> surveys in the Piceance Basin and Roan Plateau areas, I have never
      >> found a SSHA nest in an aspen. I am interested to hear more about the
      >> experiences of others in this regard.
      >>
      >> As Coen mentioned, SSHA are generally very quiet and shy when a nest
      >> is approached. I have been eye to eye with a nesting female at less
      >> than 10 feet before noticing the nest. However, Cooper's Hawks will
      >> also remain quietly on a nest if they are still incubating. They seem
      >> to get more aggressive once the chicks are a week or more old. I
      >> don't have enough personal experience with incubating GOHA, but their
      >> cantankerous reputation with chicks is well-known.
      >>
      >> Based on the overall size of the nest in relation to the tail, and the
      >> fact that the nest does not seem to be very "decorated," I am guessing
      >> COHA.
      >>
      >> Terry Meyers
      >>
      >>
      >> On Sun, Jun 23, 2013 at 11:41 AM, Larry Arnold <larnold47@...
      >> <mailto:larnold47@...>> wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> One vote from Texas is in – it’s for Sharpie
      >>
      >> Hope to get a bander’s vote - he has banded a lot of hawks at Cape
      >> May..
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Larry
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> *From:* wsbn@yahoogroups.com <mailto:wsbn@yahoogroups.com>
      >> [mailto:wsbn@yahoogroups.com <mailto:wsbn@yahoogroups.com>] *On
      >> Behalf Of *Brenda Wright
      >> *Sent:* Saturday, June 22, 2013 4:39 PM
      >> *To:* Jim Le Fevre
      >> *Cc:* wsbn wsbn
      >> *Subject:* Re: [wsbn] Need second opinions
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> Greetings,
      >>
      >> Just to be different I am voting for a Sharp-shinned Hawk for
      >> these reasons. The habitat is best for SSHA. Elevation and nest
      >> placement on a ridge is where I would expect to find a SSHA.
      >> Generally Cooper's Hawk are at lower elevation and in the botton
      >> of a canyon or riparian zone or valley. Cooper's Hawks are very
      >> aggressive and nearly always scolled when nest is approached.
      >> SSHA can be aggresive but can also stay on nest and be very
      >> quite. I always find more COHA then SSHA nest because COHA give
      >> the their nest away by calling.
      >>
      >> If the nest is very large as well as the tail, it is possible that
      >> a nearly fledged Northern Goshawk is the bird in
      >> question. Juvenile NOGO have tails similar to COHA or SSHA. If
      >> parents are away hunting then the juvenile NOGO would sit
      >> there and hope to go unnoticed. Placement of nest and elevation
      >> does work for NOGO.
      >>
      >> Dennis, you will just have to go check on the nest again.
      >>
      >> Now you have my two cents,
      >>
      >> Coen
      >>
      >> --- On *Fri, 6/21/13, Jim Le Fevre /<jimlef@...
      >> <mailto:jimlef@...>>/* wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> From: Jim Le Fevre <jimlef@... <mailto:jimlef@...>>
      >> Subject: Re: [wsbn] Need second opinions
      >> To: "Dennis Garrison" <dennisgarrison@...
      >> <mailto:dennisgarrison@...>>, "wsbn"
      >> <wsbn@yahoogroups.com <mailto:wsbn@yahoogroups.com>>
      >> Date: Friday, June 21, 2013, 6:24 PM
      >>
      >> My vote is for a Coop's. I think the width of the bands are
      >> too wide to
      >> be a Sharpie. Plus, that's a good sized nest. Made me want to
      >> think of
      >> NOGO.
      >>
      >> Jim Le Fevre
      >> Paonia, Delta County
      >>
      >> Dennis Garrison wrote:
      >>
      >>> Found this tail
      >>>
      >> <http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk296/Paoniabirds/IMG_0077lc.jpg>sticking
      >>
      >>> out of this stick nest
      >>>
      >> <http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk296/Paoniabirds/IMG_0078lc.jpg>today
      >>
      >>> while doing surveys. 9500 feet elevation on a ridgeline in
      >> spruce and
      >>> aspen mix. This was all that could be seen of the bird, and
      >> it never
      >>> moved or made a sound. Opinions on ID welcomed. I will go
      >> back shortly
      >>> to check it out again and make certain.
      >>>
      >>> Also seen:
      >>>
      >>> mama
      >> <http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk296/Paoniabirds/IMG_0067lc.jpg>
      >>> and babies
      >>>
      >> <http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk296/Paoniabirds/IMG_0074lc.jpg>
      >>>
      >>> Dennis Garrison
      >>> Paonia, Delta County
      >>>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> ------------------------------------
      >>
      >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> wsbn-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
      >> <http://us.mc1405.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=wsbn-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.