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Loudy-Simpson Park

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  • Forrest Luke
    Hi All, I had seven species of warblers at Loudy-Simpson in Craig last evening. The highlight was a N. Waterthrush, seen from the foot bridge on the nature
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 23, 2005
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      Hi All,

       

      I had seven species of warblers at Loudy-Simpson in Craig last evening.  The highlight was a N. Waterthrush, seen from the foot bridge on the nature trail.  There was also a male Nashville Warbler and 10+ Townsend’s Warblers.  I also saw several Orange-crowned Warblers and a couple of RC Kinglets—species I usually do not see until later in September.  Is migration early?

       

      The most unusual birds in this riparian habitat were four Greater Yellowlegs noisily flying to parts unknown.  Speaking of shorebirds, I stopped briefly at a gravel pit pond south of Craig and had all four expected peep species and a Lesser Yellowlegs.

       

      Regards,

       

      Forrest Luke

      Craig

    • Forrest Luke
      Hi All, Following up on a tip from Tom Litteral of Steamboat, I decided to once again put off yard work for the evening and instead make a couple of laps
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 24, 2006
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        Hi All,

         

        Following up on a tip from Tom Litteral of Steamboat, I decided to once again put off yard work for the evening and instead make a couple of laps around the Loudy-Simpson Park nature trail. Things started out well at the foot bridge at the beginning of the trail when a N. Waterthrush was bobbing around and under the bridge. As I was following the Waterthrush with my binoculars, I chanced onto this short-tailed little warbler with a very greenish back with just a touch of yellow (is that olive?). The Waterthrush was forgotten for the moment. The warbler turned out to be a Tennessee—an adult male still in alternate, albeit very worn, plumage. It had a very prominent eye stripe and supercilium and was a dingy white underneath except for the brighter white undertail coverts. The bill was dark, long and narrow (sharp-pointed). It was my second Tennessee at L-S in 14 years of trying.

         

        I ended up observing eight species of warblers—besides the waterthrush and Tennessee, there were three Townsend’s, two Nashville’s (a spanking male and a female-type), a Common Yellowthroat, and larger numbers of Wilson’s, Orange-crowned and Yellow. Earlier in the day Litteral’s group reported most of the warblers I mention, except for the Tennessee, plus another three that I didn’t see—a male A. Redstart, a Virginia’s and one or more Yellow-rumps. If my math is correct, that’s 11 species for the day!

         

        Besides warblers there were about six Lazuli Buntings, several empids with two (Willow and “Western”) that I felt somewhat comfortable about their identity, both kingbirds, BC and Rufous Hummers, and the usual assortment of resident birds. Tom’s group had an Olive-sided Flycatcher that I didn’t see.

         

        Cheers,

         

        Forrest Luke

        Craig   

      • Forrest Luke
        Hi All, I visited Loudy-Simpson last night to see if there was any steam left in the weekend passerine fallout. What I found was that while overall bird
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 29, 2006
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          Hi All,

           

          I visited Loudy-Simpson last night to see if there was any steam left in the weekend passerine fallout. What I found was that while overall bird numbers were way down there was still a good variety of birds around. I did not see the N. Waterthrush at the foot bridge that others saw yesterday but I did see what may have been a separate bird at the southwest corner of the nature trail.

           

          Wilson’s numbers were way down and yellows are starting to rapidly thin out, but I lucked onto a warbler feeding flock (try to locate the resident BC Chickadees, feeding flocks like to hang around them) that contained 5-6 Townsend’s Warblers, a male Nashville and at least one Orange-crowned. MacGillivray’s are still lurking in the underbrush in good numbers.

           

          There was not too much for non-warblers, although I saw my first two Western Tanagers of this migration season. Tom Litteral mentioned seeing a couple of Black-headed Grosbeaks that escaped my scrutiny. I only saw one empid and it remained unidentified.

           

          Forrest Luke

          Craig

        • Forrest Luke
          Stopped by the park last night and had a Northern Waterthrush and three Townsend s Warblers. Not too much of anything else other than the usuals. Forrest Luke
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 2, 2009
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            Stopped by the park last night and had a Northern Waterthrush and three Townsend’s Warblers. Not too much of anything else other than the usuals.

             

            Forrest Luke

            Craig


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          • Forrest Luke
            I had the pleasure of running into Riley Morris and his wife Heather, along with Riley s uncle David Morris, at Loudy-Simpson Park this morning. I have known
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 24, 2013
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              I had the pleasure of running into Riley Morris and his wife Heather, along with Riley’s uncle David Morris, at Loudy-Simpson Park this morning. I have known David for years as he taught all four of my kids during their middle school years. I really enjoyed getting to know Riley and Heather, who were all the way up from Durango to attend a wedding this weekend. But not before we did a little birding together.

               

              And the birding was good. We had nine species of warblers, headlined by Nashville (2+), Northern Waterthrush (1) and Townsend’s (5 or so). Other nice finds included a juvenile male Indigo Bunting (amongst many Lazuli Buntings) and a calling Least Flycatcher (latest ever date for me in Craig). Yesterday’s storms grounded a bunch of migrating passerines and made for a fun morning.

               

              I later went over to the CMS pond and found a few shorebirds, including LB Dowitcer (3), single Baird’s and Spotted Sandpipers, and a Wilson’s Phalarope.

               

              Good Birding,

               

              Forrest Luke

              Craig


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            • Forrest Luke
              There was a pretty good fallout at Loudy-Simpson Park in Craig during the rain last evening. Species with approximate numbers were as follows: Wilson s (40),
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 10, 2013
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                There was a pretty good fallout at Loudy-Simpson Park in Craig during the rain last evening. Species with approximate numbers were as follows:

                Wilson’s (40), Townsend’s (20), Orange-crowned (20), Yellow-rumped (10), MacGillivray’s (5) and Nashville (2) Warblers; Warbling Vireo (2); Hammond’s Flycatcher (1); Western Tanager (2); Lazuli Bunting (2) (a little late); and the first White-crowned (2) and Lincoln’s (10) Sparrows of the fall. Breeding residents still hanging in there included Osprey (1), Black-chinned Hummer (1), WW Pewee (2), catbird (4) and House Wren (some). It always makes me a little sad when I don’t see any Yellow Warblers, but they will be back come next May.

                 

                Good Birding,

                 

                Forrest Luke

                Craig


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              • Forrest Luke
                There was a fair assortment of migrants at Loudy-Simpson Park in Craig this morning, highlighted by a Northern Waterthrush and 5-6 Townsend s Warblers. Good
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 6, 2014
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                  There was a fair assortment of migrants at Loudy-Simpson Park in Craig this morning, highlighted by a Northern Waterthrush and 5-6 Townsend’s Warblers.

                   

                  Good Birding,

                   

                  Forrest Luke

                  Craig


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