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Scoter totals so far this fall

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  • Andrew Spencer
    Hey all, Since the publication of the article on Scoters in Colorado that Nathan Pieplow and I wrote for the previous CFO journal I have been keeping tabs on
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 17, 2007
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      Hey all,
      Since the publication of the article on Scoters in Colorado that
      Nathan Pieplow and I wrote for the previous CFO journal I have been
      keeping tabs on how many scoters have been reported in Colorado this
      fall. As most of you have no doubt noticed, this has been a
      ridiculously good fall for Black Scoters, and a rather poor one for
      White-wingeds. The totals so far this fall (minus a few reports I
      didn't add since they were never posted to cobirds or wsbn - could the
      observers of those reports email me totals off-list?):

      Surf Scoter - 36
      White-winged Scoter - 8
      Black Scoter - 22

      So, this has been the best year ever for Black Scoters in Colorado,
      beating last years 19. As of now the Surf Scoter numbers are at about
      84% of the six year (2001-2006) average, White-winged at 48%, and Black
      at 228%. These numbers will undoubtedly all rise, as prime scoter time
      is now here. Check out your lakes! This may be the year to get Black
      Scoter in some good counties (Cheyenne, anyone?!)

      I would also like to ask anyone who does find a scoter in Colorado to do
      their best to determine the age of the bird. If we can tell the
      proportions of immatures to adults it will be easier to hypothesize why
      the birds are here, i.e. whether or not they are wanderers or birds on a
      normal albeit minor migration route. From my personal observations, and
      from those of others who have aged birds they saw there is an apparent
      heavy bias towards juvenile birds, which would lend credence to the
      wanderer hypothesis.

      Good scotering to all,

      Andrew Spencer
      Centennial, CO
    • larry arnold
      Andrew, This is a very interesting posting. Thank You. Have the total numbers changed with off-line reporting directly to you? Please post a final tally for
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 19, 2007
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        Andrew,
         
        This is a very interesting posting.  Thank You.
        Have the total numbers changed with off-line reporting directly to you? 
        Please post a final tally for the season!  Would be nice to see.
         
        Have you noticed any recent shifts in migration windows vs. older records?
         
        Thanks,
        Larry
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, November 17, 2007 9:46 PM
        Subject: [wsbn] Scoter totals so far this fall

        Hey all,
        Since the publication of the article on Scoters in Colorado that
        Nathan Pieplow and I wrote for the previous CFO journal I have been
        keeping tabs on how many scoters have been reported in Colorado this
        fall. As most of you have no doubt noticed, this has been a
        ridiculously good fall for Black Scoters, and a rather poor one for
        White-wingeds. The totals so far this fall (minus a few reports I
        didn't add since they were never posted to cobirds or wsbn - could the
        observers of those reports email me totals off-list?):

        Surf Scoter - 36
        White-winged Scoter - 8
        Black Scoter - 22

        So, this has been the best year ever for Black Scoters in Colorado,
        beating last years 19. As of now the Surf Scoter numbers are at about
        84% of the six year (2001-2006) average, White-winged at 48%, and Black
        at 228%. These numbers will undoubtedly all rise, as prime scoter time
        is now here. Check out your lakes! This may be the year to get Black
        Scoter in some good counties (Cheyenne, anyone?!)

        I would also like to ask anyone who does find a scoter in Colorado to do
        their best to determine the age of the bird. If we can tell the
        proportions of immatures to adults it will be easier to hypothesize why
        the birds are here, i.e. whether or not they are wanderers or birds on a
        normal albeit minor migration route. From my personal observations, and
        from those of others who have aged birds they saw there is an apparent
        heavy bias towards juvenile birds, which would lend credence to the
        wanderer hypothesis.

        Good scotering to all,

        Andrew Spencer
        Centennial, CO

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