Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hummingbirds banded - today's snapshot

Expand Messages
  • Steve & Debbie Bouricius
    Hello Western Slope birders: This morning we set up to band birds and hosted two wonderful families of observers. Debbie and I banded 66 new hummingbirds plus
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 11 4:22 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Western Slope birders:

      This morning we set up to band birds and hosted two wonderful families
      of observers. Debbie and I banded 66 new hummingbirds plus one
      recapture. Species, age and sex as follows. AHY = after hatch year
      bird or adult; HY = hatch year or immature:

      Rufous RUHU
      AHY M 0
      AHY F 7
      HY M 11
      HY F 10

      Total 30

      Black-chinned BCHU
      AHY M 4
      AHY F 2
      HY M 12
      HY F 6

      Total 24

      Calliope CAHU
      AHY M 0
      AHY F 3
      HY M 5
      HY F 4

      Total 12

      The recapture was an AHY female banded here in June by Joanna Chan, our
      excellent hummingbird bander in training.

      Today we ran 8 traps and 35 feeders. Rufous dominate throughout the
      yard and gardens with an hour to hour turnover of migrating individuals.
      We're seeing the last of the adult male Rufous and Black-chinned as
      they head south. Adult male Calliopes have largely departed, but they
      typically make up only a small fraction of the CAHU in Colorado.
      Consider any adult male Calliope at this late date to be special.

      Still present this morning was a good candidate for adult male Allen's
      Hummingbird, a "Rufous/Allen's" with a largely green back (pictured
      below). He has eluded us for three days. We've caught many such
      possible Allen's since 1992, but all have proven to be the "green
      backed" Selasphorus rufous.

      Fattest bird today was a male Rufous weighing 4.6 grams, the lightest
      was a Calliope weighing 2.7 grams. The heaviest CAHU was a 3.7 gram
      immature male, weighing about 60% more than a breeding adult male. On
      Thursday, one pudgy male Rufous weighed in at 5.2 grams. We have caught
      a few 6 gram RUHU in the past. When they take off to fly they resemble
      a heavy loon skimming water as they slowly gain altitude. Heavy fat
      deposits are an indicator of a bird in migration.

      We're recording the hummer populations as best we can both here and in
      the mountains on the Front Range. Next week we head for the conference
      of the Hummingbird Research Group, a coalition of banding researchers
      who gather every two years. This year we meet in southeast Arizona
      where we expect to study and band many of the birds of the region.

      Keep watching those hummers,


      Steve Bouricius


      **********************************
      Steve & Debbie Bouricius
      3412 C Road
      Palisade, CO 81526
      970-434-5918
      Hummingbird Orchards
      ....Banding and Research Station
      USGS Bird Banding Laboratory permit #23198
      CDOW Scientific Collections permit #07BD834
      NABC certified master hummingbird banders
      **********************************
    • Steve & Debbie Bouricius
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 11 4:57 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        :>)
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.