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Re: [ws100] Hot weather running at WS100 this year

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  • thewashman@aol.com
    Carl, One thing you can count on is that it will be a dry heat which really does feel better than the same temperature here in the East where humidity is high.
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 31, 1969
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      Carl,

      One thing you can count on is that it will be a dry heat which really does feel better than the same temperature here in the East where humidity is high. The best thing you can do is drink, drink and then drink some more. The dry heat will make you think you are not sweating, but, believe me, you will be sweating. The start will feel nice but soon, when the sun gets high, it will get hot. When it does, back off on your pace until you get to a pace that is comfortable but which does not exhaust you. Every 100 miler is an experiment for the next one, so you'll just have to hope to get it right. As long as you keep ahead of the cutoffs, you are doing OK. Remember, if you get to Foresthill with something left, you should finish. I ran negative splits each of the last two years; although, keep in mind, there was snow in the first twenty miles those years (not nearly as much last year). This year it should be runable after Emmigrant Pass so that is where you should make up !
      some time. Once you drop down to Duncan Canyon, it will be hot from there to Michigan Bluff (or farther if you are fast). Also, eat early and often because it gets hard to keep things down during the heat of the day. After dark, things get better, if you haven't overdone it; although, by then, you are at a lower altitude and it can be hot. Especially, if you are like me and will finish just below the 30 hours. From No-Hands Bridge to Roby Point, it is like running in an oven on the second morning.

      Talk later,
      Jeff Washburn
    • Ziesing, Hunter S
      I think there is a cooling trend on the way. It is much cooler today (on the coast) and next week is a long way away weather wise. My advice (I am a first
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 15, 2000
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        I think there is a cooling trend on the way.
        It is much cooler today (on the coast) and next week is a long way away
        weather wise.

        My advice (I am a first timer 100 miler) is to drink a ton.
        Start hydrating now and get you body used to processing a lot of water.

        There is usually ice at the aid stations.

        HZ

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Carl Pegels [SMTP:cpegels@...]
        > Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2000 9:45 AM
        > To: ws100@egroups.com
        > Subject: [ws100] Hot weather running at WS100 this year
        >
        > Fellow runners: If the current weather in Northern Clifornia continues
        > until next week the WS100 run will be a scorcher. Do any of the
        > experienced Western Staters have any strategies to deal with the heat,
        > especially for those of us from places were it just has not been hot so
        > far this year. For instance is there any ice available at the aid
        > stations? Even one or two cubes in a waterbottle would help to keep the
        > water cool. Hot or lukewarm water does not provide much cooling effect
        > on a really hot day.Or do we just grind it out with an obviously high
        > attrition rate. In any event I want to do whatever necessary to survive
        > in what appears to become a scorcher. Thanks for sharing ideas. Carl
        > Pegels
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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      • Stan Jensen
        Carl, Most of the aid stations will have ice for your water bottles and many will have sponge buckets so that you can apply cool water to your arms and legs.
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 15, 2000
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          Carl,

          Most of the aid stations will have ice for your water bottles and many
          will have sponge buckets so that you can apply cool water to your arms
          and legs. In addition to the advice about drinking a lot (and often), my
          advice is to stay cool (i.e. keep your body temperature low). Stay in
          the shade when possible, use streams to dampen a bandana for your neck,
          and take it easy until the sun goes down.

          Stan
          --
          Stan Jensen, P.O. Box 3426, Half Moon Bay, CA 94019-3426
          http://www.Run100s.com/ mailto:StanJ@...
        • Jim Winne
          On 15 Jun 00, at 13:40, Stan Jensen wrote: It will be hot in the canyons. The only question is will it be 110 or only 90. Listen to Stan, he knows of what he
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 15, 2000
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            On 15 Jun 00, at 13:40, Stan Jensen wrote:

            It will be hot in the canyons. The only question is will it be 110 or
            "only" 90. Listen to Stan, he knows of what he speaks. There will be
            several items for sale at Squaw that you might want to check out. The
            Ice Cap, which I haven't used but those that have it swear by it and
            the Cool Off Bandanna which I do have. It has a foam center which
            holds water much longer than a regular bandanna. Another item that I
            recommend, especially if you have a crew who can exchange them,
            are bandannas sold by REI I think among others, that have gel pellets
            sewn into it. You soak it in ice water for awhile and the pellets absorb
            the water and expand. My experience is they stay cold for more than
            an hour and provide very effective cooling.

            Jim "Safety Patrol" Winne

            > Carl,
            >
            > Most of the aid stations will have ice for your water bottles and many
            > will have sponge buckets so that you can apply cool water to your arms
            > and legs. In addition to the advice about drinking a lot (and often),
            > my advice is to stay cool (i.e. keep your body temperature low). Stay
            > in the shade when possible, use streams to dampen a bandana for your
            > neck, and take it easy until the sun goes down.
            >
            > Stan
            > --
            > Stan Jensen, P.O. Box 3426, Half Moon Bay, CA 94019-3426
            > http://www.Run100s.com/ mailto:StanJ@...
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