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Re: [wraithbeta] Question on Grammar

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  • laura_hackett@tiscali.co.uk
    It s certainly a phrase I am familiar with, and I m a Brit. I don t know whether it s exclusively British though. It means basically, a surprise, something
    Message 1 of 10 , May 22, 2006
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      It's certainly a phrase I am familiar with, and I'm a Brit. I don't know
      whether it's exclusively British though.

      It means basically, a surprise, something unexpected. I looked it up in
      'Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable' and the definition reads:

      A completely unexpected result or occurrance, especially a welcome one. 'Turn-up'
      alludes to the turning up of a particular card in a game, while the 'book'
      is the one kept by a bookmaker on a racecourse. the expression dates from
      the 1940s.

      Hope this clears it up for you.

      Laura.

      >-- Original Message --
      >To: wraithbeta@yahoogroups.com
      >From: "Anthony Docimo" <keenir@...>
      >Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 00:17:43 +0000
      >Subject: Re: [wraithbeta] Question on Grammar
      >Reply-To: wraithbeta@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      ><html><body>
      >
      >
      ><BR>
      ><BR>
      >>Example one is not correct, at least not if you're talking about two<BR>
      >>separate sentences.<BR>
      >><BR>
      >>So, for example this is correct:<BR>
      >><BR>
      >>"I think I underestimated you, Rodney," John said.  "This
      >is a turn up for<BR>
      >>the books."<BR>
      ><BR>
      >If I may ask, is that a British expression?  What does "a turn
      >up for the <BR>
      >books" mean?  *curious*<BR>
      ><BR>
      >thank you

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