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Re: Question on Grammar

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  • redthunder213
    ... I ve always written something similar to the above as: You know, blustered Rodney. I have absolutely no idea what you re talking about. Is that also
    Message 1 of 10 , May 22, 2006
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      > "You know," blustered Rodney, "I have absolutely no idea what
      > you're talking about."

      I've always written something similar to the above as:

      "You know," blustered Rodney. "I have absolutely no idea what you're
      talking about."

      Is that also correct?

      Thanks for the clarification!
      RedThunder
    • Alyse
      ... It can be *provided* you wanted to have two separate sentences. In other words, if you wanted to write: You know. I have absolutely no idea what you re
      Message 2 of 10 , May 22, 2006
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        On 5/22/06, redthunder213 <redthunder213@...> wrote:
        > > "You know," blustered Rodney, "I have absolutely no idea what
        > > you're talking about."
        >
        > I've always written something similar to the above as:
        >
        > "You know," blustered Rodney. "I have absolutely no idea what you're
        > talking about."

        It can be *provided* you wanted to have two separate sentences. In
        other words, if you wanted to write:

        "You know. I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about," said Rodney.

        What you actually have is a fragment (an incomplete sentence) followed
        by another sentence. So, while it wouldn't be grammatically correct,
        people aren't always grammatically correct and do use fragments in
        dialogue (and in thought patterns as well). Personally, I wouldn't
        for Rodney's dialogue, because with Rodney's inflections and speech
        patterns, it's unlikely (imho) that he'd actually be saying two
        separate sentences there. Rodney doesn't tend to use fragments in his
        speech, largely because his thoughts are whizzing around so quickly,
        and his speech is so rapid, that he actually ends up with run on
        sentences rather than sentence fragments. Although, saying that, he
        does sometimes cut himself off in mid thought and change direction as
        something new occurs to him but *personally* I'd either use a dash or
        ellipses to indicate that :)

        John is different, because he does have a habit of using fragments
        like that, so it would strike me as being less odd for John than it
        would be for Rodney.

        In other words, it's not grammatically correct, but could be correct
        for the character, depending on someone's canonical speech patterns :)

        Hope that helps.

        --
        love and Thorntons' chocolates

        Al

        =================================================
        unconsciousmind - www.unconsciousmind.co.uk
        =================================================
      • Anthony Docimo
        ... If I may ask, is that a British expression? What does a turn up for the books mean? *curious* thank you.
        Message 3 of 10 , May 22, 2006
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          >Example one is not correct, at least not if you're talking about two
          >separate sentences.
          >
          >So, for example this is correct:
          >
          >"I think I underestimated you, Rodney," John said. "This is a turn up for
          >the books."

          If I may ask, is that a British expression? What does "a turn up for the
          books" mean? *curious*

          thank you.
        • laura_hackett@tiscali.co.uk
          It s certainly a phrase I am familiar with, and I m a Brit. I don t know whether it s exclusively British though. It means basically, a surprise, something
          Message 4 of 10 , May 22, 2006
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            It's certainly a phrase I am familiar with, and I'm a Brit. I don't know
            whether it's exclusively British though.

            It means basically, a surprise, something unexpected. I looked it up in
            'Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable' and the definition reads:

            A completely unexpected result or occurrance, especially a welcome one. 'Turn-up'
            alludes to the turning up of a particular card in a game, while the 'book'
            is the one kept by a bookmaker on a racecourse. the expression dates from
            the 1940s.

            Hope this clears it up for you.

            Laura.

            >-- Original Message --
            >To: wraithbeta@yahoogroups.com
            >From: "Anthony Docimo" <keenir@...>
            >Date: Tue, 23 May 2006 00:17:43 +0000
            >Subject: Re: [wraithbeta] Question on Grammar
            >Reply-To: wraithbeta@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            ><html><body>
            >
            >
            ><BR>
            ><BR>
            >>Example one is not correct, at least not if you're talking about two<BR>
            >>separate sentences.<BR>
            >><BR>
            >>So, for example this is correct:<BR>
            >><BR>
            >>"I think I underestimated you, Rodney," John said.  "This
            >is a turn up for<BR>
            >>the books."<BR>
            ><BR>
            >If I may ask, is that a British expression?  What does "a turn
            >up for the <BR>
            >books" mean?  *curious*<BR>
            ><BR>
            >thank you

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