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The homophone/spelling thing got me thinking....

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  • Laura
    about one of the things I notice a lot when betaing/reading. Namely the capitalisation of rank. The way I understand it, a title/rank should be capitalised if
    Message 1 of 3 , May 15, 2006
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      about one of the things I notice a lot when betaing/reading. Namely
      the capitalisation of rank.

      The way I understand it, a title/rank should be capitalised if it's
      a form of address:

      "Hello, Colonel, how are you?"

      Though it doesn't seem to hold true if you're using
      sir/madam: "Yes, sir."

      But if you aren't talking about someone specifically, it's lower
      case: "I think the colonel's really hot." As opposed to: "I think
      Colonel Sheppard is really hot."

      Same thing in narrative, if it's not a specific person, it's lower
      case: Doctor McKay turned to the other doctor and said...

      Maybe I've got it wrong. If so, can someone set me straight?

      This has also reminded me about a couple of other things. Firstly,
      another US/UK difference- the use of s rather than z i.e.
      realised/realized.

      Secondly, another common thing I see is the lack of commas when
      addressing someone. When one character addresses another, it should
      have commas on either side of that address: "So, John, how are you
      today?" It's that first comma that most people seem to forget.

      Hope this is useful to someone.

      Laura.
    • Alyse
      ... See, I would capitalise the first one too because you are speaking about a *specific* Colonel, namely Lt. Colonel Sheppard. However, if you find colonels
      Message 2 of 3 , May 15, 2006
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        On 5/15/06, Laura <laura_hackett@...> wrote:
        > But if you aren't talking about someone specifically, it's lower
        > case: "I think the colonel's really hot." As opposed to: "I think
        > Colonel Sheppard is really hot."

        See, I would capitalise the first one too because you are speaking
        about a *specific* Colonel, namely Lt. Colonel Sheppard.

        However, if you find colonels in general to be hot (it's the uniform
        ::g::), then it's lower case.

        > Secondly, another common thing I see is the lack of commas when
        > addressing someone. When one character addresses another, it should
        > have commas on either side of that address: "So, John, how are you
        > today?" It's that first comma that most people seem to forget.

        Yes, that's another common error we see a lot of on WB. The most
        common errors in terms of dialogue go something like this:

        - punctuating dialogue tags incorrectly, i.e. using full stops and
        upper case when the sentence actually continues beyond the dialogue.

        - not using commas to offset direct forms of address in dialogue (it's
        not just names but any form of address, e.g. sir, madam, dude, man,
        Colonel etc.)

        - forgetting to start a new paragraph when someone new begins to speak.

        Other common errors include:

        - run on sentences where several sentences have been combined into one
        without any punctuation

        - incorrect spelling of canon character names (even though we have a
        dropdown list that includes many of them) - Shepherd/Shepard, Mckay,
        Zalenka/Zelanka, Wier, Aidan, Tayla. Kavanaugh.

        Ronan/Ronon and Emmagen/Emmegan is slightly more difficult because at
        different times the two official sites (MGM and SciFi) have actually
        used different spellings. These days I go with the SciFi version on
        account of the fact that they always seem to win those particular
        arguments :)

        - not offsetting sub-clauses in sentences with commas (or dashes, if
        that suits the flow and form of the sentence better). A sub-clause is
        an elaboration on what you're saying in the sentence, providing more
        information to the reader.

        The point is, however, that you can take it out of the sentence and
        still have the sentence make sense. That's why it's considered a
        sub-clause, and is separated from the rest of the sentence by commas.

        For example:

        The city of Atlantis is a wondrous sight.

        The city of Atlantis, which is in the Pegasus Galaxy, is a wondrous sight.

        Other common homonym/homophone errors:

        - sight/site.
        - loathe/loath
        - loose/lose - this one is *incredibly* common.

        --
        love and Thorntons' chocolates

        Al

        =================================================
        unconsciousmind - www.unconsciousmind.co.uk
        =================================================
      • redthunder213
        ... Like so many aspects of English grammar (hello, whom ), this seems to be in the process of changing. The rule of thumb that I was taught is that if it s
        Message 3 of 3 , May 15, 2006
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          > The way I understand it, a title/rank should be capitalised if
          > it's a form of address:

          Like so many aspects of English grammar (hello, "whom"), this seems to
          be in the process of changing. The rule of thumb that I was taught is
          that if it's replacing someone's name, then it should be capitalized.
          Otherwise, it shouldn't.

          I personally wouldn't capitalize colonel in "the colonel", even though
          it is specifically referring to an individual. Feel free to educate
          me if I'm wrong:)

          "loose/lose" -- How did I forget that one? It's one of the worst.
          *shudder*
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