Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [wraithbeta] Homophones

Expand Messages
  • Laryn
    Here s the question - verbatim: I see the then/than and know/now thing a lot when dealing with British authors. I m a Yank, so I ve assumed this was a
    Message 1 of 6 , May 14, 2006
      Here's the question - verbatim:
       
      I see the "then/than" and "know/now" thing a lot when dealing with British authors. I'm a Yank, so I've assumed this was a common spelling difference, much list potato/potatoe - can anyone verify that?  I've assumed, since it's been used consistently by my British authors, that it is simply a spelling difference but if not then it's definately something to look for in my stories.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Laryn
      Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 8:51 PM
      Subject: Re: [wraithbeta] Homophones

      Quick question.
       
      I see the "then/than" and "know/now" thing a lot when dealing with British authors. I'm a Yank, so I've assumed this was a common spelling difference, much list potato/potatoe - can anyone verify that?  I've assumed, since it's been used consistently by my British authors, that it is simply a spelling difference but if not then it's definately something to look for in my stories.
       
      Laryn
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 1:05 PM
      Subject: [wraithbeta] Homophones

      Hey everyone,

      I've been noticing homophone abuse running rampant throughout
      stories, so I thought I'd post some helpful tips and/or explanations
      for common mistakes.

      -"your" and "you're" -- If you can replace the word with "you are",
      then use "you're".  Otherwise, use "your".

      -"its" and "it's" -- If you can replace the word with "it is", then
      use "it's".  Otherwise, use "its".

      -"affect" and "effect" -- This one's tougher, but generally if it's
      a result, then it is an "effect" and if it's something that is
      likely to cause a result, then it is "affect".

      -"then" and "than" -- "Then" is used for time and for cause and
      effect relationships (i.e., if-then), "than" is used for comparison.

      -"to" and "too" -- If you can replace the word with "also", then
      use "too".  Otherwise, use "to".

      -"now" and "know" -- These aren't even homophones, but I see this
      problem a lot.  "Now" is an indicator of time.  "Know" is an
      indicator of understanding.

      -"bear" and "bare" -- "Bear" is a furry animal or a verb meaning to
      take on a weight.  "Bare" is nakedness.

      -"lead" and "led" -- "Lead" is the present tense of the verb meaning
      to preceed others (or a heavy metal element on the periodic
      table).  "Led" is the past tense of "lead".

      -"they're", "there", "their" -- If you can replace the word
      with "they are", use "they're".  "There" is an indicator of
      location.  "Their" indicates possession.


      I'm sure there are more, but those are the ones I could think of off
      the top of my head. 

      Please let me know if this was helpful -- I don't have time to beta
      individual stories, but I'd be happy to make up grammar tutorials if
      anyone thinks they would be useful.

      RedThunder





    • redthunder213
      I m a Yank, too, but I ve read a vast amount of British literature and have never noticed any spelling differences with regard to then/than and know/now .
      Message 2 of 6 , May 14, 2006
        I'm a Yank, too, but I've read a vast amount of British literature and
        have never noticed any spelling differences with regard to "then/than"
        and "know/now". Maybe it's more of how they pronounce the words? In
        my speech neither of these are truly homophones, so it's not difficult
        for me to tell them apart. Perhaps that's not the case with British
        pronunciation?


        --- In wraithbeta@yahoogroups.com, "Laryn" <aleirian@...> wrote:
        >
        > Quick question.
        >
        > I see the "then/than" and "know/now" thing a lot when dealing with
        British authors. I'm a Yank, so I've assumed this was a common
        spelling difference, much list potato/potatoe - can anyone verify
        that? I've assumed, since it's been used consistently by my British
        authors, that it is simply a spelling difference but if not then it's
        definately something to look for in my stories.
      • Laura Hackett
        How odd. No, we have the same use for then/than and now/know as you do. Funnily enough, I ve seen this same thing in a couple of authors that *I believe* were
        Message 3 of 6 , May 15, 2006
          How odd.  No, we have the same use for then/than and now/know as you do.  Funnily enough, I've seen this same thing in a couple of authors that *I believe* were from southern areas of the US, and assumed the same thing, that it was just the differences between US and UK spelling.
           
          The most common differences, where we don't use a completely different word (i.e. tap/faucet, pavement/sidewalk), are:
           
          re/er - centre/center
          the addition of u- favour/favor
          double ll- dialled/dialed
           
          I know these are more spellings than homophones, but it might be useful regardless.  There are probably more, but these are the big three and they used to really throw me when I started reading US books, and, for some reason, threw me all over again when I started reading fanfic ::is confused::.  Needless to say, my fingers itched like mad when I did my first bit of beta work for a US author, but I restrained myself :).
           
          Laura.
          -----Original Message-----
          From: wraithbeta@yahoogroups.com [mailto:wraithbeta@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Laryn
          Sent: 15 May 2006 02:51
          To: wraithbeta@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [wraithbeta] Homophones

          Quick question.
           
          I see the "then/than" and "know/now" thing a lot when dealing with British authors. I'm a Yank, so I've assumed this was a common spelling difference, much list potato/potatoe - can anyone verify that?  I've assumed, since it's been used consistently by my British authors, that it is simply a spelling difference but if not then it's definately something to look for in my stories.
           
          Laryn
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.