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Re: Mingo this past June, some unknowns

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  • mata_15417
    Hi Denise Thank you for your reply. Actually, Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa was something that I had considered for that particular growth but I just wasn t sure
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 28, 2008
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      Hi Denise

      Thank you for your reply. Actually, Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa was
      something that I had considered for that particular growth but I just
      wasn't sure because in the specimen I photographed the fruiting bodies
      all seemed to be hanging, whereas in the photos I saw on the web
      typically showed the fruiting bodies going in all directions. With
      that stated however, I am aware that the growth-forms of fungi and
      slime molds can vary considerably.

      In regards to photo 5, I hadn't thought about that being a slime mold,
      but it does seem to fit. In fact, when I did a google image search
      for myxomysetes, I saw photos of another genus (Lycogala) that
      photographed recently near Zelienople, Pa that I would have likely
      inquired about soon. There is also a white slime mold that I took
      photos of in Grindstone, PA that I believe may be in that group.

      The only slime molds that I really know to see are Fuligo septica and
      Stemonitis splendens.

      Anyhow, I appreciate your help and thanks again.

      Steve

      --- In wpamushroomclub@yahoogroups.com, Denise Binion <myxo1@...> wrote:

      > Hi Steve,
      > Images 3, 4 and 5 look like myxomycetes to me. 3 & 4 - Ceratiomyxa
      fruticulosa. #5 looks a bit like Metatrichia vesparium, but I can't be
      sure from the photograph.
    • mata_15417
      Hi Noah, Thanks for the ID. I m not sure if that is the same species that I d come across earlier or not. I may have it written down at home. Those were the
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 28, 2008
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        Hi Noah,

        Thanks for the ID. I'm not sure if that is the same species that I'd
        come across earlier or not. I may have it written down at home.
        Those were the fungus that initially caught my attention that day as
        it was a large group and they were virtually glowing in the dappled
        sunlight. It was really quite stunning to see, at least to me.

        Well it looks like all have been identified, with the exception of
        that odd flat one in the first picture. But I won't be surprised if
        someone nails that one soon.

        Thanks again,
        Steve

        --- In wpamushroomclub@yahoogroups.com, noah siegel <nsiegel1@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'll add names for 7&8; They are Pleurotus pulmonarius.
        >  
        > =Noah
        >
        >
        > --- On Fri, 11/28/08, David W. Fischer <david@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: David W. Fischer <david@...>
        > Subject: Re: [wpamushroomclub] Mingo this past June, some unknowns
        > To: wpamushroomclub@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Friday, November 28, 2008, 5:27 PM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Steve,
        >  
        > I can put names on two of them easily: The second photo shows
        Calocera cornea, and the sixth is Sarcoscypha occidentalis.
        >  
        > =D
        >  
        > David W. Fischer
        > Mycologist, Author, Photographer, Musician
        > Author, Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America (1992, Univ. of Texas
        Press)
        > Coauthor, Mushrooms of Northeastern North America (1997, Syracuse
        Univ. Press)
        > http://AmericanMush rooms.com
        >
        >  
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: mata_15417
        > To: wpamushroomclub@ yahoogroups. com
        > Sent: Friday, November 28, 2008 10:21 AM
        > Subject: [wpamushroomclub] Mingo this past June, some unknowns
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi All,
        >
        > Towards the end of June, this past summer, my son and I did some
        > hiking at Mingo Creek County Park, Washington County. It turned out
        > to be a rather good fungal day for me, although my son grew a bit
        > bored with m picture taking. There are number of fungi I
        > photographed that day that I'm uncertain of. I've done some
        > checking, although not a lot, and I either haven't been able to
        > identify these, or I'm not sure of the IDs. They all seem to be
        > somewhat distinctive to me so I'm thinking that for someone who is
        > familiar with them they may be easy to ID (although perhaps not to
        > species).
        >
        > One is a fairly large white (translucent) shelf fungus. That's one
        > that I may have figured out, although I don't recall what I thought
        > it was. I do remember that whatever the species was it was said to
        > be edible, although not choice. There is also a little red cup-like
        > fungus, much smaller than scarlet elf cup (Sarcoscypha coccinea) and
        > not nearly as cup-like (almost like a mini Chanterelle) . I saw a
        > photo online that may have been similar and that was described as
        > Scutellinia sp. I did in fact find eyelash fungus, possibly
        > (Scutellinia scutellata), nearby as well as Shaggy scarlet cup
        > (Microstoma floccose).
        >
        > There was also something that I believe may be one of the tooth
        > fungi, and a small yellow fungus that might be some form of coral
        > fungus. There was one species of coral fungus in the vicinity, I
        > believe it was crown-tipped (Clavicorona pyxidata) but this other is
        > quite different from that. And then there are a couple of others
        > that it's would be difficult for me to properly describe, but I have
        > posted photos.
        >
        > With the exception of the little red fungus, these were all growing
        > on dead fallen trees that were lying across a stream channel. The
        > sections of the logs with the fungus were elevated several feet,
        > rather than at ground level and in contact with the soil.
        >
        > As mentioned previously, I've posted photos of some of the unknowns
        > to the photo section for any of you would like to take a look. And
        > if you have any additional questions or comments just let me know.
        >
        > The photos are in a folder titled Steve's Pics and the link is:
        > http://tech. ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/wpamushroo mclub/photos/
        browse/33
        > a1
        >
        > Thanks in advance.
        >
        > Steve
        >
      • aminitam
        Hey Steve, The odd flat one looks like a burl, not fungus, though burls may be caused by fungi. Any idea what kind of tree that flat one was growing on?
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 2, 2008
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          Hey Steve,

          The odd flat one looks like a burl, not fungus, though burls may be
          caused by fungi. Any idea what kind of tree that flat one was growing on?

          Cheers,

          Jim

          --- In wpamushroomclub@yahoogroups.com, "mata_15417" <mata_15417@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hi Noah,
          >
          > Thanks for the ID. I'm not sure if that is the same species that I'd
          > come across earlier or not. I may have it written down at home.
          > Those were the fungus that initially caught my attention that day as
          > it was a large group and they were virtually glowing in the dappled
          > sunlight. It was really quite stunning to see, at least to me.
          >
          > Well it looks like all have been identified, with the exception of
          > that odd flat one in the first picture. But I won't be surprised if
          > someone nails that one soon.
          >
          > Thanks again,
          > Steve
          >
          > --- In wpamushroomclub@yahoogroups.com, noah siegel <nsiegel1@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I'll add names for 7&8; They are Pleurotus pulmonarius.
          > >  
          > > =Noah
          > >
          > >
          > > --- On Fri, 11/28/08, David W. Fischer <david@> wrote:
          > >
          > > From: David W. Fischer <david@>
          > > Subject: Re: [wpamushroomclub] Mingo this past June, some unknowns
          > > To: wpamushroomclub@yahoogroups.com
          > > Date: Friday, November 28, 2008, 5:27 PM
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi Steve,
          > >  
          > > I can put names on two of them easily: The second photo shows
          > Calocera cornea, and the sixth is Sarcoscypha occidentalis.
          > >  
          > > =D
          > >  
          > > David W. Fischer
          > > Mycologist, Author, Photographer, Musician
          > > Author, Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America (1992, Univ. of Texas
          > Press)
          > > Coauthor, Mushrooms of Northeastern North America (1997, Syracuse
          > Univ. Press)
          > > http://AmericanMush rooms.com
          > >
          > >  
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: mata_15417
          > > To: wpamushroomclub@ yahoogroups. com
          > > Sent: Friday, November 28, 2008 10:21 AM
          > > Subject: [wpamushroomclub] Mingo this past June, some unknowns
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi All,
          > >
          > > Towards the end of June, this past summer, my son and I did some
          > > hiking at Mingo Creek County Park, Washington County. It turned out
          > > to be a rather good fungal day for me, although my son grew a bit
          > > bored with m picture taking. There are number of fungi I
          > > photographed that day that I'm uncertain of. I've done some
          > > checking, although not a lot, and I either haven't been able to
          > > identify these, or I'm not sure of the IDs. They all seem to be
          > > somewhat distinctive to me so I'm thinking that for someone who is
          > > familiar with them they may be easy to ID (although perhaps not to
          > > species).
          > >
          > > One is a fairly large white (translucent) shelf fungus. That's one
          > > that I may have figured out, although I don't recall what I thought
          > > it was. I do remember that whatever the species was it was said to
          > > be edible, although not choice. There is also a little red cup-like
          > > fungus, much smaller than scarlet elf cup (Sarcoscypha coccinea) and
          > > not nearly as cup-like (almost like a mini Chanterelle) . I saw a
          > > photo online that may have been similar and that was described as
          > > Scutellinia sp. I did in fact find eyelash fungus, possibly
          > > (Scutellinia scutellata), nearby as well as Shaggy scarlet cup
          > > (Microstoma floccose).
          > >
          > > There was also something that I believe may be one of the tooth
          > > fungi, and a small yellow fungus that might be some form of coral
          > > fungus. There was one species of coral fungus in the vicinity, I
          > > believe it was crown-tipped (Clavicorona pyxidata) but this other is
          > > quite different from that. And then there are a couple of others
          > > that it's would be difficult for me to properly describe, but I have
          > > posted photos.
          > >
          > > With the exception of the little red fungus, these were all growing
          > > on dead fallen trees that were lying across a stream channel. The
          > > sections of the logs with the fungus were elevated several feet,
          > > rather than at ground level and in contact with the soil.
          > >
          > > As mentioned previously, I've posted photos of some of the unknowns
          > > to the photo section for any of you would like to take a look. And
          > > if you have any additional questions or comments just let me know.
          > >
          > > The photos are in a folder titled Steve's Pics and the link is:
          > > http://tech. ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/wpamushroo mclub/photos/
          > browse/33
          > > a1
          > >
          > > Thanks in advance.
          > >
          > > Steve
          > >
          >
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