Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [worldlanglist] Re: Netlang

Expand Messages
  • rkupsala
    ... That book tells that almost every kind of imaginable language has been made, tested and tried in the auxlang scene. Netlang reminds me of a pictographic
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 26, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Steve Rice wrote:
      > In _One Language for the World_ (pp 145-146), Mario Pei writes

      That book tells that almost every kind of imaginable language has been
      made, tested and tried in the auxlang scene.

      Netlang reminds me of a pictographic language, you know, if you replaced
      numbers with images. Just today I found one pictographic language called
      Earthlang. See http://www.earthlanguage.org/english/briefsys.htm
      It resembles Netlang. It even has "Free word order between the
      subject/verb/object in a sentence" and the grammatical markers look like
      punctuation signs!

      So it's advisable to check out some existing pictographic and a-priori
      languages. There is always something new to learn.

      Personally I am in favor of spoken languages. I have made (still making) a
      language called Pandunia together with Jens. Basically you could replace
      Pandunia's words with symbols, images or numerical sequences because every
      word is unchanging. I just haven't seen any reason to do so. It is more
      pleasant to speak words, you know.

      Best regards,
      Risto Kupsala
    • orangev58
      ... Yeah I had a look at Pandunia, I like how clean it is. The problem I have with spoken languages is that we don t really speak to anyone. The only real
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 26, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        > Personally I am in favor of spoken languages. I have made (still making) a
        > language called Pandunia together with Jens.

        Yeah I had a look at Pandunia, I like how clean it is.

        The problem I have with spoken languages is that we don't really speak to anyone. The only real device we have to communicate to the whole world is the internet, and it's almost entirely text.

        The internet affords us the ability to use a language without even fully understanding it. With strict grammar very simple software could construct sentences for us.

        > It is more pleasant to speak words, you know.

        I do agree with you. But I feel the auxlang problem is a practical problem. It's not about art, or pleasure or personal preference. It's about what is the simplest, most efficient way we can communicate ideas to the most number of people with the minimum misunderstanding.
      • Jens Wilkinson
        ... I think that depends a bit on who you are. I work in a fairly international place, so I end up talking to people from a range of backgrounds, mostly
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 26, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          On 2013/07/27, at 12:18, "orangev58" <orangev58@...> wrote:

          >
          > The problem I have with spoken languages is that we don't really speak to anyone. The only real device we have to communicate to the whole world is the internet, and it's almost entirely text.
          >
          I think that depends a bit on who you are. I work in a fairly international place, so I end up talking to people from a range of backgrounds, mostly Japanese but from around the world. We mostly speak in English because it's the default. So for me at least it's a practical issue.

          Jens
        • Stephen Rice
          ... Risto dusts and disinfects it daily. He s a tidy guy. ... But that s changing. Podcasts, Skype, and YouTube (and similar sites) are bringing an audio and
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 27, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            On 7/26/13, orangev58 <orangev58@...> wrote:
            >> Personally I am in favor of spoken languages. I have made (still making)
            >> a
            >> language called Pandunia together with Jens.
            >
            > Yeah I had a look at Pandunia, I like how clean it is.

            Risto dusts and disinfects it daily. He's a tidy guy.

            > The problem I have with spoken languages is that we don't really speak to
            > anyone. The only real device we have to communicate to the whole world is
            > the internet, and it's almost entirely text.

            But that's changing. Podcasts, Skype, and YouTube (and similar sites)
            are bringing an audio and even visual element to internet
            communication. Various auxlangs are already active in these areas,
            though currently the only worldlang with much of an audio-visual
            presence is LdP.

            > The internet affords us the ability to use a language without even fully
            > understanding it.

            Stupidity can have the same effect. I've seen people trying to use
            auxlangs they didn't understand--I've done it myself--and the result
            often isn't useful. Curiously, Esperanto, frequently dismissed as too
            complicated, withstands such abuse better than "simpler" languages
            such as LdP and Pandunia.

            With strict grammar very simple software could construct
            > sentences for us.

            If you want to be technical, you don't need an auxlang at all, then:
            use simple grammar, reasonably unambiguous words--and something like
            Google Translate.

            >> It is more pleasant to speak words, you know.
            >
            > I do agree with you. But I feel the auxlang problem is a practical problem.
            > It's not about art, or pleasure or personal preference. It's about what is
            > the simplest, most efficient way we can communicate ideas to the most number
            > of people with the minimum misunderstanding.

            Needs vary. Tourists have different needs than scholars (and scholar
            differs from scholar according to the specific field of study),
            businesspeople and journalists have unique needs, and so on. Some can
            get by with a kind of phrasebook; others need something more complex.
            Depending on the language's structure, a basic version for limited
            needs could be set up. Probably most people who need an auxlang at all
            could get by with a kind of phrasebook; only scholars are likely to
            need more.

            Steve
          • Dana Nutter
            Why am I on this list? I cancelled all my groups and closed my Yahoo account years ago.
            Message 5 of 16 , Aug 18, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Why am I on this list? I cancelled all my groups and closed my Yahoo
              account years ago.
            • Risto Kupsala
              ... You must have subscribed with email only. Send email to worldlanglist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com. You will receive a confirmation message, reply that
              Message 6 of 16 , Aug 18, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                18.8.2013 16:12, Dana Nutter wrote:
                > Why am I on this list? I cancelled all my groups and closed my Yahoo
                > account years ago.

                You must have subscribed with email only. Send email to
                worldlanglist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com. You will receive a
                confirmation message, reply that email and then you will be out of here.

                This group has been quiet for over a year but you used to be active here
                a few years ago.

                --Risto
              • Dana Nutter
                ... Sorry didn t mean anything personal. One of the reasons I gave up on Yahoo were all the bugs and associated privacy leaks. Likewise why I gave up
                Message 7 of 16 , Aug 25, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 8/18/13 2:57 PM, Risto Kupsala wrote:
                  > 18.8.2013 16:12, Dana Nutter wrote:
                  >> Why am I on this list? I cancelled all my groups and closed my Yahoo
                  >> account years ago.
                  >
                  > You must have subscribed with email only. Send email to
                  > worldlanglist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com. You will receive a
                  > confirmation message, reply that email and then you will be out of here.
                  >
                  > This group has been quiet for over a year but you used to be active here
                  > a few years ago.
                  >
                  > --Risto
                  >

                  Sorry didn't mean anything personal. One of the reasons I gave up on
                  Yahoo were all the bugs and associated privacy leaks. Likewise why I
                  gave up Fakebook, Google and all the rest.



                  --
                  ♂ Dana Nutter
                  dana.nutter@...
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.