Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [worldlanglist] Re: Relexed NP

Expand Messages
  • risto@kupsala.net
    ... They need those things. They also need to communicate better with the rest of the world. World auxlang could help to bring some relief because it would
    Message 1 of 125 , Sep 1, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Dana Nutter wrote:
      > On 08/28/2011 11:11 PM, Stephen Rice wrote:
      >>
      >> ....
      >>> That's the problem. Those who could setup the world auxiliary do not
      >>> need it, whereas those who need the world auxiliary have no means to
      >>> bring it about.
      >> No. The people who could use an auxlang are in the developed nations.
      >> The third-world countries don't need an auxlang; they need reliable
      >> supplies of decent food, water, medicine, and jobs; fewer thugs,
      >> kleptocrats and homicidal loony despots; and a touch of civil order
      >> not supplied by jackboots. Auxlangs make no contribution to all this.

      They need those things. They also need to communicate better with the rest
      of the world. World auxlang could help to bring some relief because it
      would help to spread information and ideas. Maybe future auxlang
      bestseller is titled "Growing Edibles on Backyard" or "How to Oust a
      Dictator in 30 Days" or "Teach Yourself Your Universal Human Rights".

      With auxlang there would also be more opportunities for business between
      the developing countries and also between the developing and the developed
      countries.

      >> This is why (again) the target audience is not everyone in the whole
      >> world but everyone currently capable of using an auxlang--a fairly
      >> small group. As/if problems are properly addressed, the potential user
      >> base will expand, and worldlangs will become viable.

      I'm not going to wait for that. I believe that the winner takes it all.

      > If the third world is ever to rise up economically, they need to get
      > inline with the rest of us. One of the things that is boosting India
      > right now is the call center business. While I could easily argue
      > against Indian call centers since nobody seems to be able to communicate
      > well with them, they do in fact exist because of India's faily large
      > "anglophone" population.

      The people in the call centers are in fact some of the best English
      speakers in India. What does your reaction tell about English as the world
      language?

      > Even Chile's program is called "English Opens
      > Doors". Look online and you'll see the TEFL business is thriving in
      > China.

      I bet it's a good business. It takes ages to learn English.

      > Moving up in the world first means communicating with those who
      > have what you are after, and those people speak English, not Esperanto.

      It's our job to change that. And don't give me any "It's too overwhelming
      for us" crap! Let's do it! >=(

      -- Risto
    • Dana Nutter
      ... Even in IT, they don t have any experts or specialists. They mostly just hand out scripts and flow charts for the operators to follow. ... Same in the US.
      Message 125 of 125 , Sep 3, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        On 09/02/2011 03:41 PM, Risto Kupsala wrote:
        > 2.9.2011 16:03, Dana Nutter kirjoitti:
        >> On 09/02/2011 08:26 AM, Nikhil Sinha wrote:
        >>> Hi!
        >>>
        >>> You seem to have a very wrong idea. A call centre job isn't exactly a
        >>> "dream" job. People end up in call centres when they have nothing else
        >>> to do, or they just want to make easy money for sometime. A call
        >>> centre job cannot become anyone's career. It's only for a few months
        >>> or years.
        >> I've had the displeasure of call centers when I badly needed a job.
        >> They are horrible lower-pay, stressful jobs. They aren't much better
        >> than working in sweatshops.
        > Okay, now I understand. I thought that the call centers offer customer
        > service jobs in helplines, where people have to be experts in some area
        > in addition to speaking very good English. Maybe I had too rosy picture
        > because my employer's tech support is partly in India, and those jobs
        > require real experts because they serve IT specialists who need help
        > only in difficult cases. Some college drop-out couldn't be of service.
        Even in IT, they don't have any experts or specialists. They mostly
        just hand out scripts and flow charts for the operators to follow.
        > So in fact the situation in India is about the same as here in Finland
        > where telemarketing jobs are low-pay and usually short-term jobs.
        Same in the US.


        > Concerning the Indian English accent, both northern and southern variety
        > are difficult to understand. There have been situations when I have
        > thought that Indians are speaking some Indian language among themselves,
        > but after a while I have realized that actually they were speaking
        > English all the time! The problem is not only the sound but also that
        > Indians speak English very fast and in different rhythm. Don't take any
        > offence, Nikhil, I know that Finnish accent of English is also really
        > awful. :-)
        I also deal with Brazilians who are hard to understand sometimes, but
        still much easier than the Indians that run our Help Desk. Previously
        one of the help desk groups we had also had a call center in Costa Rica.

        "Awful" is subjective. Intelligible is another story, and often one of
        exposure level to a particular dialect.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.