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Hoopoe, Upupa epops, Wiedehopf ... India

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  • Greve Gabi
    ... http://haiku.cc.ehime-u.ac.jp/nobo/20060928/18357.html ... ............................................................. QUOTE: Upupa epops, En. Hoopoe,
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 28, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      >
      > rain-spotted wall
      > the hoopoe's dipping flight
      > takes it to a rooftop
      >
      > - Johannes Manjrekar
      http://haiku.cc.ehime-u.ac.jp/nobo/20060928/18357.html
      >
      .............................................................
      QUOTE:

      Upupa epops, 
      En. Hoopoe, Da. Hærfugl, Du. Hop, Fi. Harjalintu, Fr. Huppe fasciée, Ge. Wiedehopf, It. Upupa, No. Hærfugl, Sp. Abubilla, Sw. Härfågel

      The Hoopoe is a bizarre creation with crazy black and white banding across its wings and tail, an eccentric black-tipped crest, long, down-curved bill and an orange coloured body. Its dramatic plumage is best seen when the bird flies with floppy, rounded, fingered wings, flicking like a big moth.

      http://www.birdguides.com/html/vidlib/species/Upupa_epops.htm

      ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

      Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops)
      is a common resident in India.   Size: 30 cm.

      Identification:
      Eurasian Hoopoe is a medium-sized bird. Plumage on the chest varies from pinkish-brown to chestnut. The broad, rounded wings, back, and tail are barred black and white. The spectacular erectile crest is the same color as the head and tipped with black. The bill is long, slender, and decurved; modified musculature allows it to be opened when the bird probes for food. Hoopoes have short legs. Sexes alike. Juveniles are duller than adults, the white in the wings is tinged with cream and the crest and bill are relatively short.

      Distribution:
      A total of 9 subspecies distributed all over Asia, Africa and Europe. Three of them are found in India: U. epops epops, U. epops ceylonensis and U. epops longirostris.

      Food:
      Mainly insects, particularly larvae and pupae. Spiders, earthworms, woodlice, and centipedes are also taken, while lizards, frogs, and small snakes have been recorded. Hoopoes forage mainly in short grass and on bare soil. They walk about, constantly making short probes into the ground and sometimes pausing to insert the bill fully, opening and closing it to test or seize objects encountered. They also hawk flying insects.

      Habits:
      The hoopoe is a confiding bird and can be found near human habitation. The crest is usually held flat but raised when the bird alights or is excited. The flight is distinctive, with erratic, butterfly-like flapping. Hoopoes perch readily and can climb rough surfaces. They are diurnal, roosting in cavities at night. Hoopoes are migratory over much of their range. Most Palaearctic birds migrate to Africa and southern Asia after breeding. Races breeding in Asia make shorter-range movements to southern Asia. Local populations in Africa and southern Asia are migratory, resident, or nomadic.

      Breeding:
      Hoopoes are monogamous and nest in holes in trees, walls, cliffs, termite mounds, flat ground, and crevices between rocks. Little nest material is used, and the nest cavity is often fetid. A nest site may be used for several years. The male selects the nest site and establishes territory. Eggs are produced at a rate of one per day. Clutch size is five to eight. The incubation period is 15–18 days, only the female incubates, and hatching is asynchronous.
      The nestling period is 25–32 days. Young start self-feeding after six days, thereafter remaining with the parents for some weeks. Hoopoes are normally single-brooded. Nestlings defend themselves by hissing, jabbing with the bill, producing an evil-smelling secretion from uropygial gland and spraying feces.

      http://www.birding.in/birds/Upupiformes/Upupidae/eurasian_hoopoe.htm

      :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

      Look at more photos here:

      http://images.google.co.jp/images?hl=en&q=hoopoe&btnG=Google+Search&sa=N&tab=wi


      :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
      Back to the INDIA SAIJIKI

      http://indiasaijikiworlkhaiku.blogspot.com/

       
    • Gabi for Worldkigo
      ... ée, Ge. ... banding across ... curved bill ... when the bird ... moth. ... varies from ... tail are ... color as ... decurved; ... for food. ... adults,
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 9, 2008
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        > > rain-spotted wall
        > > the hoopoe's dipping flight
        > > takes it to a rooftop
        > >
        > > - Johannes Manjrekar
        > http://haiku.cc.ehime-u.ac.jp/nobo/20060928/18357.html
        > >


        > .............................................................
        > QUOTE:
        >
        > Upupa epops,
        > En. Hoopoe, Da. Hærfugl, Du. Hop, Fi. Harjalintu, Fr. Huppe fasci
        ée, Ge.
        > Wiedehopf, It. Upupa, No. Hærfugl, Sp. Abubilla, Sw. Härfågel
        >
        > The Hoopoe is a bizarre creation with crazy black and white
        banding across
        > its wings and tail, an eccentric black-tipped crest, long, down-
        curved bill
        > and an orange coloured body. Its dramatic plumage is best seen
        when the bird
        > flies with floppy, rounded, fingered wings, flicking like a big
        moth.
        >
        > http://www.birdguides.com/html/vidlib/species/Upupa_epops.htm
        >
        > ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

        >
        > Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops)
        > is a common resident in India. Size: 30 cm.
        >
        > Identification:
        > Eurasian Hoopoe is a medium-sized bird. Plumage on the chest
        varies from
        > pinkish-brown to chestnut. The broad, rounded wings, back, and
        tail are
        > barred black and white. The spectacular erectile crest is the same
        color as
        > the head and tipped with black. The bill is long, slender, and
        decurved;
        > modified musculature allows it to be opened when the bird probes
        for food.
        > Hoopoes have short legs. Sexes alike. Juveniles are duller than
        adults, the
        > white in the wings is tinged with cream and the crest and bill are
        > relatively short.
        >
        > Distribution:
        > A total of 9 subspecies distributed all over Asia, Africa and
        Europe. Three
        > of them are found in India: U. epops epops, U. epops ceylonensis
        and U.
        > epops longirostris.
        >
        > Food:
        > Mainly insects, particularly larvae and pupae. Spiders, earthworms,
        > woodlice, and centipedes are also taken, while lizards, frogs, and
        small
        > snakes have been recorded. Hoopoes forage mainly in short grass
        and on bare
        > soil. They walk about, constantly making short probes into the
        ground and
        > sometimes pausing to insert the bill fully, opening and closing it
        to test
        > or seize objects encountered. They also hawk flying insects.
        >
        > Habits:
        > The hoopoe is a confiding bird and can be found near human
        habitation. The
        > crest is usually held flat but raised when the bird alights or is
        excited.
        > The flight is distinctive, with erratic, butterfly-like flapping.
        Hoopoes
        > perch readily and can climb rough surfaces. They are diurnal,
        roosting in
        > cavities at night. Hoopoes are migratory over much of their range.
        Most
        > Palaearctic birds migrate to Africa and southern Asia after
        breeding. Races
        > breeding in Asia make shorter-range movements to southern Asia.
        Local
        > populations in Africa and southern Asia are migratory, resident,
        or nomadic.
        >
        > Breeding:
        > Hoopoes are monogamous and nest in holes in trees, walls, cliffs,
        termite
        > mounds, flat ground, and crevices between rocks. Little nest
        material is
        > used, and the nest cavity is often fetid. A nest site may be used
        for
        > several years. The male selects the nest site and establishes
        territory.
        > Eggs are produced at a rate of one per day. Clutch size is five to
        eight.
        > The incubation period is 15E8 days, only the female incubates,
        and hatching
        > is asynchronous.
        > The nestling period is 25E2 days. Young start self-feeding after
        six days,
        > thereafter remaining with the parents for some weeks. Hoopoes are
        normally
        > single-brooded. Nestlings defend themselves by hissing, jabbing
        with the
        > bill, producing an evil-smelling secretion from uropygial gland
        and spraying
        > feces.
        >
        >
        http://www.birding.in/birds/Upupiformes/Upupidae/eurasian_hoopoe.htm
        >
        > :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
        >
        > Look at more photos here:
        >
        > http://images.google.co.jp/images?
        hl=en&q=hoopoe&btnG=Google+Search&sa=N&tab=wi
        >
        >
        >
        *::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
        :**
        > Back to the INDIA SAIJIKI*
        > http://indiasaijikiworlkhaiku.blogspot.com/
        >
        ..................................................................

        The Conference of the Birds
        is a book of poems in Persian by Farid ud-Din Attar of approximately
        4500 lines.

        The poem uses a journey by a group of 30 birds, led by a hoopoe
        as an allegory of a Sufi sheikh or master leading his pupils to
        enlightenment.
        ...."

        ( Source:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Conference_of_the_Birds !!!!!! )



        and

        The Hoopoe featured in Greek mythology.
        Once a man, Tereus was transformed into the form of a Hoopoe. The
        character featured prominently in such works as Aristophanes' The
        Birds.
        Muslims associate the Hoopoe with the Prophet Suleyman (King
        Solomon) and the Queen of Sheba's visit.
        In classical Chinese poetry, the Hoopoe is depicted as a celestial
        messenger often bearing news of the spring. The Hoopoe is generally
        considered auspicious in China thanks to its unique beauty.
        A hoopoe figures centrally in The Conference of the Birds, one of
        the central works of Sufi literature.
        A fantastical mechanical Hoopoe with telepathic powers is featured
        in Salman Rushdie's book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories.
        (Quelle) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoopoe

        http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiedehopf

        .....................................................................
        .
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