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Proposal: Experts Engaging Experts

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  • Andrius Kulikauskas
    Jeff, Thank you very much for your helpful comments. I share my proposal to Steve Cayzer of Hewlett-Packard. I also attached a preliminary map of key
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 6, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Jeff, Thank you very much for your helpful comments. I share my
      proposal to Steve Cayzer of Hewlett-Packard. I also attached a
      preliminary map of key concepts which is at:
      http://www.openleader.info/wiki.cgi?OpenLeader/KeyConcept/Map Andrius

      ---------------------------------------------------
      Experts Engaging Experts:
      A Conceptual Map of People's Values
      ---------------------------------------------------

      A proposal by Andrius Kulikauskas of Minciu Sodas to Steve Cayzer of
      Hewlett-Packard.

      -----------------------
      Purpose
      -----------------------

      How do we find the best expert in a given domain?

      This problem is key for the largest institutions, governments,
      corporations, endeavors. The World Wide Web has not solved this
      problem. The Semantic Web might, especially if it is "made out of
      people". The Semantic Web could help experts from different fields
      engage each other by making explicit the deepest values which they think
      in terms of.

      It would be wonderful to navigate a conceptual map of experts organized
      by metrics that express similarity in terms of proximity. We could then
      define the ideal expert we are looking for and find the closest match.
      But on what basis could we organize such a map? And how would it relate
      to all we might mean by "best"?

      At the Minciu Sodas laboratory, we have observed regularities that make
      possible such a map:

      * Highly self-directed people are able to formulate their "key concept"
      in life, their deepest value that encompasses all of their other values
      (such as "living by truth", "participatory society", "learning from each
      other"). More than 100 have provided us their key concepts. Almost all
      of them allow us to post such information publicly. These key concepts
      are highly stable. They are useful because they make it straightforward
      to engage and support such people directly through their outlooks on
      life rather than through projects that tend to come and go, or topics
      that may not reveal their deeper interests. [1]
      * Such self-directed leaders are also able to order other people's key
      concepts in terms of how close or distant they feel to each concept.
      These rankings can be used as metrics to construct a map of the
      concepts. We have drawn a preliminary, two-dimensional map. The
      rankings suggest an underlying conceptual framework which all people may
      access. The data might be modeled with an appropriate geometry, for
      example, the surface of a four-dimensional sphere. We need to collect
      and analyze more rankings, look for different kinds of regularities and
      consider various geometries. [2]
      * Many of these self-directed people are able to state "investigatory
      questions" which they don't know the answer to, but intend to answer,
      and which others might engage them regarding. (For example, "How can
      society be organized to minimize the waste of precious resources?")
      We're finding that these questions give directions in which these
      independent thinkers are personally growing and leading others by their
      example. They seem to relate what they know (their key concept) with
      what they don't know (perhaps another point in the conceptual space).
      The questions seem to be vectors in the conceptual space.
      * Domains of expertise (such as "artificial neural networks", "distance
      learning", "community currency", "knowledge management") attract
      thinkers of kindred values and so may be thought of as regions within
      the conceptual map. We're finding that natural leaders for such domains
      are the people who are asking questions that are advancing relevant
      knowledge, and who are willing to include and advise others with related
      questions.

      This conceptual map can mark a new paradigm in the shaping of the
      Semantic Web so that it lets us compute similarity relationships. This
      map of values:

      * Organizes our attention on people through the values they identify with.
      * Provides semantic stability, as people's key concepts are ultimately
      nonverbal, they can be clarified and renamed, and so are more stable and
      meaningful than the buzz words often used to describe domains.
      * Allows people to provide their own public self-assessment of their
      values and lets us all hold them accountable to it.
      * Taps into the value at the core of a person's unconscious, personal,
      intuitive, tacit knowledge regarding which they are truly expert.
      * Makes us aware of people's deepest values and biggest questions so
      that we engage them as they would themselves.
      * Acknowledges every person as the expert regarding their own key
      concept, if they have one. Yet people can cover very different regions
      with their questions, and one person may be more advanced than another
      as an investigator. This makes it straightforward to identify leaders,
      suggest advisers and divide domains.
      * Anchors all manner of content from people which may be tagged and then
      queried, yielding a variety of maps for availability, location,
      qualifications, services offered, help requested, and so on.
      * Enables people to attach definite nonverbal meaning to nonverbal
      artifacts such as pictures, memories, experiences.
      * Quantifies the differences between values and amongst people, so that
      we can note similarities and consider substitutes, or ensure a diversity
      of perspectives.
      * Allows people to share and compare portfolios.
      * Lets us think of the best person as the one who is most appropriately
      challenged, engaged by an issue.
      * Indicates what is profoundly meaningful to people and so intelligent
      agents can assist with information flow.
      * Suggests a distributed system where information is associated with
      people who are responsible to maintain it as they know best.
      * Acknowledges and leverages the human culture which may go beyond a
      person's work within a corporation, but which sustains and fosters them,
      and increases their internal motivation.

      Most importantly, this approach to the Semantic Web allows people to
      engage people as people. We can further relate the conceptual space of
      human values with other conceptual spaces for color, music, taste, time
      and so forth, as in publications by Peter Gärdenfors, Joseph Goguen,
      Mark Johnson and other great thinkers who we work with. [3]

      Hewlett-Packard can provide the conceptual map and interface to its
      largest customers as tools that are especially useful for online
      communities which wish to navigate values so as to:
      * choose strategic areas of insight to focus on,
      * appreciate the culture that is relevant to various knowledge domains,
      * fuel people's motivation by recognizing their values,
      * encourage leadership by championing values driven design,
      * identify key areas of knowledge that should be documented in case
      people leave,
      * attract partners who can contribute relevant perspectives,
      * understanding partners' long-term interests,
      * facilitate co-investment with partners, for example,
      ** in completing a corporate merger,
      ** in conducting research with academic institutions, or
      ** in working together with customers.
      The map can be used to discuss personal outlooks directly or indirectly
      (placing oneself on the map or not) or to consider the social context
      (and the relationships between various outlooks).

      -------------------------------------------------------------
      The Advantage of Working Openly
      -------------------------------------------------------------

      This conceptual map is especially difficult to develop in a traditional
      corporate environment because of privacy concerns. The map organizes
      people's most personal outlooks. Each key concept may be thought of as
      another name for "love". Such personal information may be shared freely
      only if it is made in the most public and the most voluntary of spaces.
      Our Minciu Sodas laboratory is such a space.

      -----------------------
      Deliverables
      -----------------------

      In the Public Domain:
      * Data from people about their key concepts, investigatory questions,
      and how they feel about various values; as well as letters in the Public
      Domain which they are writing about their interests; and tagged excerpts.
      * A conceptual analysis of the key concepts.
      * A mathematical model for generating a map.
      * Online visualisation software for presenting and navigating the model.
      (We may use existing software like TouchGraph or perhaps an entirely new
      interface that we may program in a language such as Python and formats
      such as SVG, XML or possibly AJAX.)
      * Software for entering data for the online map.
      * Software for relating additional content, metadata to people in the map.
      * Software for updating that content (possibly by aggregating from RSS
      feeds taken from Yahoo groups, wikis, blogs, del.icio.us, etc. )
      * Data and content, in the Public Domain, from our lab's activities,
      especially our correspondence, demonstrating the value of the map.
      * Assistance to interested Hewlett-Packard employees and partners so
      they might publicly participate in the lab's activities and make use of
      the map.
      * Summary of work done (possibly presented at a conference). Work will
      be hosted at the Minciu Sodas websites and may be mirrored at
      Hewlett-Packard websites.

      In private:
      * Consultation, in person, by phone, in writing, as requested during the
      six months and for three months afterwards.

      This list of deliverables may be ammended at any time upon agreement by
      Andrius Kulikauskas of Minciu Sodas and Steve Cayzer of Hewlett-Packard
      (or other liaison who Hewlett-Packard may assign).

      ----------------------------------------
      Budget
      ----------------------------------------

      Total: 9,000 GBP and 3 laptops.

      6,000 GBP = 6 months x 1,000 GBP - Andrius Kulikauskas, investigation,
      development, management, coding, travel as needed.

      1,500 GBP = 6 months x 250 GBP - Helmut Leitner, customization of
      ProWiki wiki engine and wiki metadata for updating the map and
      organizing related tags.

      1,500 GBP = 3 months x 250 GBP x 2 people = Jeff Buderer and Markus
      Petz, interviewing participants, tagging content, populating the map,
      assisting in its use, testing it out.

      3 Linux-compatible laptops, for Jeff, Markus and Samwel Kongere in
      Mbita, Kenya. Their work for these laptops will back a community
      currency to reward our volunteers who contribute and organize relevant
      content.

      ----------------------------------------
      Schedule
      ----------------------------------------

      All work completed within 6 months of approval.

      40% of payment and 3 laptops upon approval and start of work.

      30% of payment upon completion of investigatory conclusions, description
      of the design for all of the software, and collection of data sufficient
      for the map (3 months after the start of work).

      30% of payment upon completion of all work, including completion of
      software and content and delivery.

      Private consultation available for no additional charge for three months
      after completion.

      ----------------------------------------------
      Our Very Special Offer
      ----------------------------------------------

      Please note! This is a very special offer which we're making because we
      understand the significance of Steve Cayzer's work on the Semantic Web,
      and he understands the opportunity of our laboratory's open approach.
      We have structured our proposal so that we might invest ourselves along
      with you. We wish to discover ways of organizing knowledge around
      people and their values. We also appreciate any opportunity to host
      "independent thinkers" at Hewlett-Packard at our open laboratory in ways
      that would help them grow regarding their own key concepts and
      investigatory questions. We wish to attract other partners to expand on
      this open work so that it might truly succeed. We work in the Public
      Domain except where you note otherwise, as when confidential matters
      arise. Please let us know how we might adapt our proposal for your
      greatest success!

      -------------------------------------
      Minciu Sodas
      -------------------------------------

      Minciu Sodas http://www.ms.lt is an online laboratory for serving and
      organizing independent thinkers. We have 150 active and 1,500
      supportive participants around the world. We have 12 working groups to
      foster global villages, open economy, tools for thinking, leadership
      development, distance learning, creative collaboration, holistic
      helping, new craft, nonviolent engagement, conceptual frameworks and
      loving God. Since 1998, we have served 20 clients as software
      developers, online organizers, business consultants, video producers,
      public relations promoters, researchers, writers and translators.

      Andrius Kulikauskas is the sole proprietor of Minciu Sodas. Minciu
      Sodas is registered in Vilnius, Lithuania. Andrius is a citizen of both
      Lithuania and the United States of America. In 1993, he received his
      Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California at San Diego. He
      has 11 years experience as a software developer and is a member of the
      Authoring Group for XML for Topic Maps. He led a working group to
      organize an import/export standard for tools for organizing thoughts.
      [4][5]

      ------------------------------------------
      Links
      ------------------------------------------

      [1] A collection of more than 100 key concepts and more than 50
      investigatory questions:
      http://www.ourculture.info/wiki.cgi?PersonalOutlooks
      [2] A tentative map of key concepts:
      http://www.openleader.info/wiki.cgi?OpenLeader/KeyConcept/Map
      [3] "How to make the Semantic Web more semantic" by Peter Gärdenfors.
      This article argues that a Semantic Web based on conceptual geometry
      would allow us to consider the similarity (and substitutability or
      optimality) of various items, concepts, opportunities:
      http://www.patternlanguages.info/wiki.cgi?PatternLanguages/SemanticWeb/MoreSemantic

      [4] Resume for Andrius Kulikauskas:
      http://www.ms.lt/en/andrius/andriuskulikauskasresume.doc
      [5] Mindset, a modeling language for tools for organizing thoughts.
      http://www.ms.lt/mindset.html

      Andrius

      Andrius Kulikauskas, Ph.D.
      Direktorius
      Minciu Sodas
      Grudu g 6
      Vilnius, LT-11306
      Lithuania
      http://www.ms.lt
      ms@...
      skype:minciusodas
      +370 (699) 30003
    • Andrius Kulikauskas
      Steve Cayzer of Hewlett-Packard responded to my proposal. He writes that it s premature for them to fund such work, but it is aligned with their interests.
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 10 7:49 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Steve Cayzer of Hewlett-Packard responded to my proposal. He writes
        that it's premature for them to fund such work, but it is aligned with
        their interests. I'm encouraged to work further. I share our
        correspondence.

        I will be writing more on my thoughts about the implications of our "key
        concepts" for semantic organization of multimedia. This was inspired by
        Colby Stuart http://colbys.blogspot.com who is working on "Networks of
        Meaning". When one person wants to share photos, video, audio with
        another person, they could use "key concepts" as a way to refer to why
        they think the person might be interested. Basically, we're finding
        that values are a good way of expressing people's interests. How might
        we apply this further?

        Raimundas Vaitkevicius has agreed to do some statistical analysis of the
        rankings that our leaders have been providing as to how close or distant
        the various key concepts feel to them. These rankings are like "sonar
        readings" and we can build a map from them. Raimundas will do a factor
        analysis (which will suggest how many dimensions are involved) and a
        cluster analysis (which will suggest what are natural subregions within
        the overall map).

        Also, what are other companies that I might approach? Do we have any
        contacts? What we're able to offer, as we do research, is to develop a
        participating online community (often crucial to new start-ups as in the
        case of Flickr), to create public assets that all might share (such as
        our directory of more than 100 key concepts), to work out some of the
        problems that arise along the way, to establish prior art and thereby
        keep patents from shutting down avenues, and to connect with other
        projects such as Colby's in venture partnerships.

        Andrius

        --------------------------------------

        Andrius,

        I apologise, a response is long overdue.

        Anyway, your proposal is very interesting. Our opinion is at the moment
        it is still quite speculative. While this would be fine for a direction
        that is very closely aligned with what we are trying to do, for a
        slightly more exploratory direction it's probably a little premature.
        Still, it would be interesting to see where it goes.

        From my perspective, i think the conceptual geometry idea is
        interesting but I'm a little sceptical that it would only be 2D, or that
        it's a 'universal truth' (I don't for example expect it to scale beyond
        a small group of like minded people). I'd be happy to be proved wrong,
        of course!

        So ways forward would include waiting 'til the ideas get more mature and
        working with your lab, or an individual from your lab applying to work
        at Labs (next year) as a contractor or student, perhaps incorporating
        elements of this work into their project.

        Just for interest, I've reflected on what my key concept would be and I
        think it's
        "Being a Force for Good".
        This perhaps needs a little explanation. I mean that I want the net
        impact of my life on this planet - ideally every action I perform on
        this planet - to be positive.
        This can be quite small - I found the film 'It's a wonderful life' to be
        inspirational, because it showed how one didn't need to be a hero, or
        famous, or perform 'big' actions affecting many people, to be a 'force
        for good'. In other words, looking after yourself, your family, your
        friends, your community, your local environment, can have a powerful
        'ripple' effect. That doesn't detract from the importance of global
        awareness and an appreciation of people from different nations and
        cultures of course - it's not a recipe for small mindedness. Rather it's
        a reminder that it's not just the leaders who make a difference.

        Regards the key concepts in your document, I found it difficult to order
        them all but here's my top 7:

        1). Caring effectively
        2). Helping Others
        3). Help as needed
        4). Love of people
        5). Social justice
        6). Accepting personal responsibility
        7). participatory society


        As a final thought, i wonder if there is any layering of psychological
        outlooks possible. For example, using Jungian terms, some of the values
        are extrovert in nature (social justice, find better ways together...)
        some are more introvert (improve myself, my own non existence). These
        are NOT value labels of course, they are just modes of operation. But
        they may provide a useful organizing framework.

        All the best

        Steve


        ----------------------------------------------

        Steve,

        Thank you for your very thoughtful reply. May I share it in the Public
        Domain with our groups? And post parts at our wiki.
        I listed your key concept at this wiki page:
        http://www.ourculture.info/wiki.cgi?SteveCayzer
        so now it appears in our list.

        Thank you for thinking of next steps. I will write my thoughts on how
        the key concepts might relate to semantic photos, video, audio, etc.. I
        will also see if there is interest from others such as Yahoo.

        Our evidence shows, as you suspect, that the layout is Not 2D. The goal
        is to figure out how many dimensions are involved and how they are
        related and to come up with a visualization for that. If we do find an
        answer, then I don't think that scaling would be a problem.

        Thank you for considering my proposal! Yes, I look forward to working
        on this further, and speaking with you after I write about semantic
        multimedia. The basic idea is that if people are comfortable linking
        themselves with a fundamental value (as many of our leaders are), and if
        there is a system of such values, then it is possible to add that as a
        metadata to multimedia to explain why the sender thinks it might be
        relevant to the receiver. For example, I send this video to you because
        I think it relates to "Love of People" and I know or guess that you care
        about that more or less. Also, note that it may be possible to link
        celebrities to values, either from their own report, or from a survey of
        people's impressions. Then such well known people (Mother Theresa, John
        Wayne, Rambo, etc.) or icons can be used as points of navigation.

        Andrius

        ----------------------------------------------------------------

        Thanks Andrius, interesting response and intriguing ideas (as ever!).
        Let's keep in touch.

        sure, share away

        Cheers

        Steve

        ----------------------------------------------------------------

        Andrius Kulikauskas wrote:

        > Jeff, Thank you very much for your helpful comments. I share my
        > proposal to Steve Cayzer of Hewlett-Packard. I also attached a
        > preliminary map of key concepts which is at:
        > http://www.openleader.info/wiki.cgi?OpenLeader/KeyConcept/Map Andrius
        >
        > ---------------------------------------------------
        > Experts Engaging Experts:
        > A Conceptual Map of People's Values
        > ---------------------------------------------------
        >
        > A proposal by Andrius Kulikauskas of Minciu Sodas to Steve Cayzer of
        > Hewlett-Packard.
        >
        > -----------------------
        > Purpose
        > -----------------------
        >
        > How do we find the best expert in a given domain?
        >
        > This problem is key for the largest institutions, governments,
        > corporations, endeavors. The World Wide Web has not solved this
        > problem. The Semantic Web might, especially if it is "made out of
        > people". The Semantic Web could help experts from different fields
        > engage each other by making explicit the deepest values which they
        > think in terms of.
        >
        > It would be wonderful to navigate a conceptual map of experts
        > organized by metrics that express similarity in terms of proximity.
        > We could then define the ideal expert we are looking for and find the
        > closest match. But on what basis could we organize such a map? And
        > how would it relate to all we might mean by "best"?
        >
        > At the Minciu Sodas laboratory, we have observed regularities that
        > make possible such a map:
        >
        > * Highly self-directed people are able to formulate their "key
        > concept" in life, their deepest value that encompasses all of their
        > other values (such as "living by truth", "participatory society",
        > "learning from each other"). More than 100 have provided us their key
        > concepts. Almost all of them allow us to post such information
        > publicly. These key concepts are highly stable. They are useful
        > because they make it straightforward to engage and support such people
        > directly through their outlooks on life rather than through projects
        > that tend to come and go, or topics that may not reveal their deeper
        > interests. [1]
        > * Such self-directed leaders are also able to order other people's key
        > concepts in terms of how close or distant they feel to each concept.
        > These rankings can be used as metrics to construct a map of the
        > concepts. We have drawn a preliminary, two-dimensional map. The
        > rankings suggest an underlying conceptual framework which all people
        > may access. The data might be modeled with an appropriate geometry,
        > for example, the surface of a four-dimensional sphere. We need to
        > collect and analyze more rankings, look for different kinds of
        > regularities and consider various geometries. [2]
        > * Many of these self-directed people are able to state "investigatory
        > questions" which they don't know the answer to, but intend to answer,
        > and which others might engage them regarding. (For example, "How can
        > society be organized to minimize the waste of precious resources?")
        > We're finding that these questions give directions in which these
        > independent thinkers are personally growing and leading others by
        > their example. They seem to relate what they know (their key concept)
        > with what they don't know (perhaps another point in the conceptual
        > space). The questions seem to be vectors in the conceptual space.
        > * Domains of expertise (such as "artificial neural networks",
        > "distance learning", "community currency", "knowledge management")
        > attract thinkers of kindred values and so may be thought of as regions
        > within the conceptual map. We're finding that natural leaders for
        > such domains are the people who are asking questions that are
        > advancing relevant knowledge, and who are willing to include and
        > advise others with related questions.
        >
        > This conceptual map can mark a new paradigm in the shaping of the
        > Semantic Web so that it lets us compute similarity relationships.
        > This map of values:
        >
        > * Organizes our attention on people through the values they identify
        > with.
        > * Provides semantic stability, as people's key concepts are ultimately
        > nonverbal, they can be clarified and renamed, and so are more stable
        > and meaningful than the buzz words often used to describe domains.
        > * Allows people to provide their own public self-assessment of their
        > values and lets us all hold them accountable to it.
        > * Taps into the value at the core of a person's unconscious, personal,
        > intuitive, tacit knowledge regarding which they are truly expert.
        > * Makes us aware of people's deepest values and biggest questions so
        > that we engage them as they would themselves.
        > * Acknowledges every person as the expert regarding their own key
        > concept, if they have one. Yet people can cover very different
        > regions with their questions, and one person may be more advanced than
        > another as an investigator. This makes it straightforward to identify
        > leaders, suggest advisers and divide domains.
        > * Anchors all manner of content from people which may be tagged and
        > then queried, yielding a variety of maps for availability, location,
        > qualifications, services offered, help requested, and so on.
        > * Enables people to attach definite nonverbal meaning to nonverbal
        > artifacts such as pictures, memories, experiences.
        > * Quantifies the differences between values and amongst people, so
        > that we can note similarities and consider substitutes, or ensure a
        > diversity of perspectives.
        > * Allows people to share and compare portfolios.
        > * Lets us think of the best person as the one who is most
        > appropriately challenged, engaged by an issue.
        > * Indicates what is profoundly meaningful to people and so intelligent
        > agents can assist with information flow.
        > * Suggests a distributed system where information is associated with
        > people who are responsible to maintain it as they know best.
        > * Acknowledges and leverages the human culture which may go beyond a
        > person's work within a corporation, but which sustains and fosters
        > them, and increases their internal motivation.
        >
        > Most importantly, this approach to the Semantic Web allows people to
        > engage people as people. We can further relate the conceptual space
        > of human values with other conceptual spaces for color, music, taste,
        > time and so forth, as in publications by Peter Gärdenfors, Joseph
        > Goguen, Mark Johnson and other great thinkers who we work with. [3]
        >
        > Hewlett-Packard can provide the conceptual map and interface to its
        > largest customers as tools that are especially useful for online
        > communities which wish to navigate values so as to:
        > * choose strategic areas of insight to focus on,
        > * appreciate the culture that is relevant to various knowledge domains,
        > * fuel people's motivation by recognizing their values,
        > * encourage leadership by championing values driven design,
        > * identify key areas of knowledge that should be documented in case
        > people leave,
        > * attract partners who can contribute relevant perspectives,
        > * understanding partners' long-term interests,
        > * facilitate co-investment with partners, for example,
        > ** in completing a corporate merger,
        > ** in conducting research with academic institutions, or
        > ** in working together with customers.
        > The map can be used to discuss personal outlooks directly or
        > indirectly (placing oneself on the map or not) or to consider the
        > social context (and the relationships between various outlooks).
        >
        > -------------------------------------------------------------
        > The Advantage of Working Openly
        > -------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > This conceptual map is especially difficult to develop in a
        > traditional corporate environment because of privacy concerns. The
        > map organizes people's most personal outlooks. Each key concept may
        > be thought of as another name for "love". Such personal information
        > may be shared freely only if it is made in the most public and the
        > most voluntary of spaces. Our Minciu Sodas laboratory is such a space.
        >
        > -----------------------
        > Deliverables
        > -----------------------
        >
        > In the Public Domain:
        > * Data from people about their key concepts, investigatory questions,
        > and how they feel about various values; as well as letters in the
        > Public Domain which they are writing about their interests; and tagged
        > excerpts.
        > * A conceptual analysis of the key concepts.
        > * A mathematical model for generating a map.
        > * Online visualisation software for presenting and navigating the
        > model. (We may use existing software like TouchGraph or perhaps an
        > entirely new interface that we may program in a language such as
        > Python and formats such as SVG, XML or possibly AJAX.)
        > * Software for entering data for the online map.
        > * Software for relating additional content, metadata to people in the
        > map.
        > * Software for updating that content (possibly by aggregating from RSS
        > feeds taken from Yahoo groups, wikis, blogs, del.icio.us, etc. )
        > * Data and content, in the Public Domain, from our lab's activities,
        > especially our correspondence, demonstrating the value of the map.
        > * Assistance to interested Hewlett-Packard employees and partners so
        > they might publicly participate in the lab's activities and make use
        > of the map.
        > * Summary of work done (possibly presented at a conference). Work will
        > be hosted at the Minciu Sodas websites and may be mirrored at
        > Hewlett-Packard websites.
        >
        > In private:
        > * Consultation, in person, by phone, in writing, as requested during
        > the six months and for three months afterwards.
        >
        > This list of deliverables may be ammended at any time upon agreement
        > by Andrius Kulikauskas of Minciu Sodas and Steve Cayzer of
        > Hewlett-Packard (or other liaison who Hewlett-Packard may assign).
        >
        > ----------------------------------------
        > Budget
        > ----------------------------------------
        >
        > Total: 9,000 GBP and 3 laptops.
        >
        > 6,000 GBP = 6 months x 1,000 GBP - Andrius Kulikauskas, investigation,
        > development, management, coding, travel as needed.
        >
        > 1,500 GBP = 6 months x 250 GBP - Helmut Leitner, customization of
        > ProWiki wiki engine and wiki metadata for updating the map and
        > organizing related tags.
        >
        > 1,500 GBP = 3 months x 250 GBP x 2 people = Jeff Buderer and Markus
        > Petz, interviewing participants, tagging content, populating the map,
        > assisting in its use, testing it out.
        >
        > 3 Linux-compatible laptops, for Jeff, Markus and Samwel Kongere in
        > Mbita, Kenya. Their work for these laptops will back a community
        > currency to reward our volunteers who contribute and organize relevant
        > content.
        >
        > ----------------------------------------
        > Schedule
        > ----------------------------------------
        >
        > All work completed within 6 months of approval.
        >
        > 40% of payment and 3 laptops upon approval and start of work.
        >
        > 30% of payment upon completion of investigatory conclusions,
        > description of the design for all of the software, and collection of
        > data sufficient for the map (3 months after the start of work).
        >
        > 30% of payment upon completion of all work, including completion of
        > software and content and delivery.
        >
        > Private consultation available for no additional charge for three
        > months after completion.
        >
        > ----------------------------------------------
        > Our Very Special Offer
        > ----------------------------------------------
        >
        > Please note! This is a very special offer which we're making because
        > we understand the significance of Steve Cayzer's work on the Semantic
        > Web, and he understands the opportunity of our laboratory's open
        > approach. We have structured our proposal so that we might invest
        > ourselves along with you. We wish to discover ways of organizing
        > knowledge around people and their values. We also appreciate any
        > opportunity to host "independent thinkers" at Hewlett-Packard at our
        > open laboratory in ways that would help them grow regarding their own
        > key concepts and investigatory questions. We wish to attract other
        > partners to expand on this open work so that it might truly succeed.
        > We work in the Public Domain except where you note otherwise, as when
        > confidential matters arise. Please let us know how we might adapt
        > our proposal for your greatest success!
        >
        > -------------------------------------
        > Minciu Sodas
        > -------------------------------------
        >
        > Minciu Sodas http://www.ms.lt is an online laboratory for serving and
        > organizing independent thinkers. We have 150 active and 1,500
        > supportive participants around the world. We have 12 working groups
        > to foster global villages, open economy, tools for thinking,
        > leadership development, distance learning, creative collaboration,
        > holistic helping, new craft, nonviolent engagement, conceptual
        > frameworks and loving God. Since 1998, we have served 20 clients as
        > software developers, online organizers, business consultants, video
        > producers, public relations promoters, researchers, writers and
        > translators.
        >
        > Andrius Kulikauskas is the sole proprietor of Minciu Sodas. Minciu
        > Sodas is registered in Vilnius, Lithuania. Andrius is a citizen of
        > both Lithuania and the United States of America. In 1993, he received
        > his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California at San
        > Diego. He has 11 years experience as a software developer and is a
        > member of the Authoring Group for XML for Topic Maps. He led a working
        > group to organize an import/export standard for tools for organizing
        > thoughts. [4][5]
        >
        > ------------------------------------------
        > Links
        > ------------------------------------------
        >
        > [1] A collection of more than 100 key concepts and more than 50
        > investigatory questions:
        > http://www.ourculture.info/wiki.cgi?PersonalOutlooks
        > [2] A tentative map of key concepts:
        > http://www.openleader.info/wiki.cgi?OpenLeader/KeyConcept/Map
        > [3] "How to make the Semantic Web more semantic" by Peter Gärdenfors.
        > This article argues that a Semantic Web based on conceptual geometry
        > would allow us to consider the similarity (and substitutability or
        > optimality) of various items, concepts, opportunities:
        > http://www.patternlanguages.info/wiki.cgi?PatternLanguages/SemanticWeb/MoreSemantic
        >
        > [4] Resume for Andrius Kulikauskas:
        > http://www.ms.lt/en/andrius/andriuskulikauskasresume.doc
        > [5] Mindset, a modeling language for tools for organizing thoughts.
        > http://www.ms.lt/mindset.html
        >
        > Andrius
        >
        > Andrius Kulikauskas, Ph.D.
        > Direktorius
        > Minciu Sodas
        > Grudu g 6
        > Vilnius, LT-11306
        > Lithuania
        > http://www.ms.lt
        > ms@...
        > skype:minciusodas
        > +370 (699) 30003
        >
        >
        >
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