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Steve Jobs, 1955–2011

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  • Thomas J. Rostafinski, Ph.D.
    ... Thank you for the tribute, John. The Washington Post s Hank Stuever wrote some poignant words about Steve and the passage of time in an article titled
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 5, 2011
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      > What would personal computers (not just Apple) be like without his
      > contributions? Would there even be a GUI? Xerox invented it, but it
      > took others, including Jobs, to realize its potential.
      >
      > It's of course true that someone else would have invented the
      > telegraph, the light bulb and the telephone, had Morse, Edison and
      > Bell not done so. The difference, though, between these and the
      > iPhone is that the latter is such a good realization of the tool.
      > Quality of interface is not something a committee can do. Vision and
      > intuitiveness are words often used to describe Jobs. Today's world
      > would be a different place without the effects of those qualities.
      >
      > R.I.P. Steve.

      Thank you for the tribute, John.

      The Washington Post's Hank Stuever wrote some poignant words about Steve
      and the passage of time in an article titled "Steve Jobs and the idea of
      letting go":

      > That is what Steve Jobs gave us: the future. A sense of ourselves
      > moving forward into this century, which has proved especially hard
      > to do, with its lack of employment opportunities and its addiction
      > to panic. He gave us a look at the future and all the ambivalence
      > and worry that comes with it. It was the most elegant form of social
      > disruption, and now your kids won’t glance up from their iPhones.
      > They’ll never need to.
      >
      > We spend a lot of time wishing for the past, carping about our
      > gizmos and the sway they lord over us, while loading up our iPods
      > with songs that were popular when we were in high school, while
      > stalking old boyfriends on Facebook. That in itself is a pleasant
      > form of grief, but it is grief all the same.
      >
      > Jobs kept nudging us away from that. Under his leadership, Apple’s
      > subliminal selling point was: Let it go. Let go of the uneasiness
      > about computers. Let go of ugly, antique technology. Let go of the
      > fantasy future of personal rocketships. Let go of the phone that you
      > bought last year for the shiny new phone that’s coming out this
      > year. But let go of something deeper, something resistant in you
      > that romanticizes the past.

      ...

      > Jobs had been teaching us to say goodbye to all that for decades — we
      > just didn’t know it. Some of us said goodbye to typewriters in the
      > 1980s when we finished term papers using MacWrite on a Macintosh Plus
      > for the first time. Some of us said goodbye when we made PTA fliers
      > and Lost Dog posters that were far and away better than their
      > Sharpie-scrawled predecessors. Let it go, let it go: Take your CDs to
      > Goodwill; give your books to the library sale.
      >
      > It was therefore an irresistible metaphor, in these final years, when
      > the auditorium lights in would go down and the crowd would go wild
      > for Jobs, who increasingly greeted his followers and touted the
      > latest neat, new thing even as he wore the look of a person who was
      > not going into that future with us. He would be getting off here; we
      > were to proceed without him into the unknown. Let it go and look
      > ahead was the message all along.

      Steve Jobs as Moses, destined not to enter the Promised Land to which he
      led his people?...

      Makes me think about our WordPerfect/SheepShaver project. Cool as it is
      to keep things working beyond their expected obsolescence (I'm sure the
      Cuban mechanics who manage to keep all those U. S.-made cars from the
      1950's running take justifiable pride in their work), I don't think of
      what we do as holding on to the past. I feel that we are keeping alive,
      and taking advantage of, quality that Steve and his Apple made possible.

      Steve will long be remembered, even as time never stops speeding the
      rest of us into the future.

      Tom
    • TradleyS
      We re all gonna miss him. We ve been using Apple computers ever since I was born. I still remember playing kids games all the time on our old Performa
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 5, 2011
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        We're all gonna miss him.

        We've been using Apple computers ever since I was born. I still remember playing kids games all the time on our old Performa Computer. Now I'm using a high-quality iMac. How his work has evolved!

        R.I.P
        Steve Jobs

        A great innovator.

        --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas J. Rostafinski, Ph.D." <TJRostaf@...> wrote:
        >
        > > What would personal computers (not just Apple) be like without his
        > > contributions? Would there even be a GUI? Xerox invented it, but it
        > > took others, including Jobs, to realize its potential.
        > >
        > > It's of course true that someone else would have invented the
        > > telegraph, the light bulb and the telephone, had Morse, Edison and
        > > Bell not done so. The difference, though, between these and the
        > > iPhone is that the latter is such a good realization of the tool.
        > > Quality of interface is not something a committee can do. Vision and
        > > intuitiveness are words often used to describe Jobs. Today's world
        > > would be a different place without the effects of those qualities.
        > >
        > > R.I.P. Steve.
        >
        > Thank you for the tribute, John.
        >
        > The Washington Post's Hank Stuever wrote some poignant words about Steve
        > and the passage of time in an article titled "Steve Jobs and the idea of
        > letting go":
        >
        > > That is what Steve Jobs gave us: the future. A sense of ourselves
        > > moving forward into this century, which has proved especially hard
        > > to do, with its lack of employment opportunities and its addiction
        > > to panic. He gave us a look at the future and all the ambivalence
        > > and worry that comes with it. It was the most elegant form of social
        > > disruption, and now your kids won't glance up from their iPhones.
        > > They'll never need to.
        > >
        > > We spend a lot of time wishing for the past, carping about our
        > > gizmos and the sway they lord over us, while loading up our iPods
        > > with songs that were popular when we were in high school, while
        > > stalking old boyfriends on Facebook. That in itself is a pleasant
        > > form of grief, but it is grief all the same.
        > >
        > > Jobs kept nudging us away from that. Under his leadership, Apple's
        > > subliminal selling point was: Let it go. Let go of the uneasiness
        > > about computers. Let go of ugly, antique technology. Let go of the
        > > fantasy future of personal rocketships. Let go of the phone that you
        > > bought last year for the shiny new phone that's coming out this
        > > year. But let go of something deeper, something resistant in you
        > > that romanticizes the past.
        >
        > ...
        >
        > > Jobs had been teaching us to say goodbye to all that for decades — we
        > > just didn't know it. Some of us said goodbye to typewriters in the
        > > 1980s when we finished term papers using MacWrite on a Macintosh Plus
        > > for the first time. Some of us said goodbye when we made PTA fliers
        > > and Lost Dog posters that were far and away better than their
        > > Sharpie-scrawled predecessors. Let it go, let it go: Take your CDs to
        > > Goodwill; give your books to the library sale.
        > >
        > > It was therefore an irresistible metaphor, in these final years, when
        > > the auditorium lights in would go down and the crowd would go wild
        > > for Jobs, who increasingly greeted his followers and touted the
        > > latest neat, new thing even as he wore the look of a person who was
        > > not going into that future with us. He would be getting off here; we
        > > were to proceed without him into the unknown. Let it go and look
        > > ahead was the message all along.
        >
        > Steve Jobs as Moses, destined not to enter the Promised Land to which he
        > led his people?...
        >
        > Makes me think about our WordPerfect/SheepShaver project. Cool as it is
        > to keep things working beyond their expected obsolescence (I'm sure the
        > Cuban mechanics who manage to keep all those U. S.-made cars from the
        > 1950's running take justifiable pride in their work), I don't think of
        > what we do as holding on to the past. I feel that we are keeping alive,
        > and taking advantage of, quality that Steve and his Apple made possible.
        >
        > Steve will long be remembered, even as time never stops speeding the
        > rest of us into the future.
        >
        > Tom
        >
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