Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: The art and science of typography

Expand Messages
  • John R
    It is. I think my favorite serif font is New Baskerville, although Bell, Caslon and Plantin are nice too. I m still on a quest for that perfect sans-serif.
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 14, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      It is. I think my favorite serif font is New Baskerville, although Bell, Caslon and Plantin are nice too. I'm still on a quest for that perfect sans-serif. Stone Sans was nice for a while . . .

      John R.



      --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, Jim Voelzow <jvoelzow@...> wrote:
      >
      > Adobe Garamond. Formal, well crafted, pleasing to the eye and easy to read.
      >
      >
      > > So -- members, what's your favorite font?
    • Rick Albright
      I ve been on a quest for the perfect font for about as long as I ve been using fonts. It never ends. For awhile I used Helvetica a lot, and while I think it s
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 14, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        I've been on a quest for the perfect font for about as long as I've been using fonts. It never ends. For awhile I used Helvetica a lot, and while I think it's still excellent for titles and headings, (and I think the film about it is intriguing), it's not all that readable for long streams of text. I did my dissertation in it, and I see now that it doesn't look all that good on the printed page. I think the serifs are needed.

        A nice alternative for text that I used when I converted the diss to a book manuscript (also in WordPerfect) is Hoefler Text Regular, and one of its advantages, besides its overall good look, is the fact that italics show up very nicely--much more distinctively than italics in Helvetica. I think Hoefler was one of the additional font families that came with WordPerfect. Garamond is also a nice font, as are Bookman and Baskerville.

        I'm quirky about fonts. I tend to like to use a font that is readable, but distinctive. By "distinctive" I mean that I really avoid anything that looks even remotely like Times New Roman because of my (completely irrational, I know) aversion to Microsoft and the way that MS made it the default font for Windows and Word (though the newer versions use a different font). So that rules out for me some good old fonts such as Palatino.

        An added wrinkle for me is that I've been trying to use a font that is fairly universal, across platforms. I teach (college English) online as well as in the classroom, and a lot of fonts that I might use will be lost due to font substitutions, and the document you've worked hard to design comes out looking completely different on another computer. So I usually try to use one of the so-called "internet fonts" that--if I understand how these things work (I'm happy to be enlightened by someone on the list)--are more universal. For awhile I've been using Trebuchet MS, which doesn't look bad, is fairly readable, and is an internet font. It's not a favorite, but it looks a little different and isn't too zany.

        This is an interesting thread!
        Rick

        On Aug 14, 2011, at 5:13 PM, John R wrote:

        > It is. I think my favorite serif font is New Baskerville, although Bell, Caslon and Plantin are nice too. I'm still on a quest for that perfect sans-serif. Stone Sans was nice for a while . . .
        >
        > John R.

        ===========================================================
        Rick Albright
        logres@...

        Writing the Past, Writing the Future: Time and Narrative in Gothic and Sensation Fiction
        http://www.powells.com/biblio/72-9780980149647-0
      • Paul Cowan
        ... Univers. But that s just me. bye, P. (^_^) ... mailto:pooru@me.com Ma, quando si acquista stati in una provincia disforme di lingua, di costumi e di
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 14, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          On 14 Aug 2011, at 5h13, John R wrote:

          > I'm still on a quest for that perfect sans-serif. Stone Sans was nice for a while . . .


          Univers. But that's just me.

          bye,


          P. (^_^)
          ---
          mailto:pooru@...

          Ma, quando si acquista stati in una provincia disforme di lingua, di costumi e di ordini, qui sono le difficultà. - Niccolò Machiavelli
        • Geoff Gilbert
          I started with Palatino when I first used a Mac in the 1990s. In SS, it is TNR for a serif and Helvetica for san serif. Boring, but seen the same on other
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 14, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            I started with Palatino when I first used a Mac in the 1990s. In SS, it
            is TNR for a serif and Helvetica for san serif. Boring, but seen the
            same on other peple's machines when shared.

            As for OS X, I use Trebuchet MS and Verdana for the san serif and TNR or
            Cambria for the serif. Boring, but transferable

            However, I have over 400 fonts sitting in the fonts folder, most of
            which never see the light of day, but which I use for stuff I am
            printing out, usually in photographic work.

            Geoff


            On 15/08/2011 00:10, Paul Cowan wrote:
            > On 14 Aug 2011, at 5h13, John R wrote:
            >
            >
            >> I'm still on a quest for that perfect sans-serif. Stone Sans was nice for a while . . .
            >>
            >
            > Univers. But that's just me.
            >
            > bye,
            >
            >
            > P. (^_^)
            > ---
            > mailto:pooru@...
            >
            > Ma, quando si acquista stati in una provincia disforme di lingua, di costumi e di ordini, qui sono le difficultà. - Niccolò Machiavelli
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • mxytsplyk
            Academy Engraved LET Book Antiqua Copperplate Techno Zapfino 1 I also recommend the Type Primer from Adobe, in the Files Section here. Joe
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 14, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Academy Engraved LET
              Book Antiqua
              Copperplate
              Techno
              Zapfino 1

              I also recommend the Type Primer from Adobe, in the Files Section here.

              Joe

              --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, Geoff Gilbert <Geoff@...> wrote:
              >
              > In WP on SS or in OS X generally?
              >
              > > So -- members, what's your favorite font?
              >
            • John R
              Steve Jobs paid attention to fonts too: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/06/steve-jobs-designer-first-c-e-o-second/?hp I think its ability with typefaces
              Message 6 of 14 , Oct 6, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Steve Jobs paid attention to fonts too:

                http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/06/steve-jobs-designer-first-c-e-o-second/?hp

                I think its ability with typefaces (and the laser printer to support it) was one of the reasons for the Mac's early success.

                John R.




                --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, "John R" <johnrethorst@...> wrote:
                >
                > Our own Ed Mendelson has published "The Human Face of Type" in the New York Review of Books:
                >
                > http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2011/aug/04/human-face-of-type/
                >
                > exploring the expressive value of different fonts, or typefaces. A significant consideration in word processing is its result, the appearance of text on the page or screen, and the choice of what font to use is a good part of that.
                >
                > I discuss this in "Teach Yourself WordPerfect", chapter 15 (text available here in message 204), and Adobe's Type Primer.pdf is in the Files section.
                >
                > So -- members, what's your favorite font? Why do you like it? Are there fonts you avoid at all cost? Does Helvetica deserve its widespread disparagement? I actually like it, being a minimalist of sorts. For other opinions, see the NY Museum of Modern Art's exhibition "50 Years of Helvetica" at
                >
                > http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/38
                >
                > and the BBC's thoughts at
                >
                > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/6638423.stm
                >
                > What other elements of page design do you like? Ragged or justified at the right margin? Optimum column width? These choices make your text more or less inviting to read.
                >
                > Ed, nice article.
                >
                > John R.
                >
              • John R
                This creates samples of fonts installed on your computer, with your choice of text, fonts, sizes, and attributes, e.g. italics and bold. More flexible than
                Message 7 of 14 , Oct 17, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  This creates samples of fonts installed on your computer, with your choice of text, fonts, sizes, and attributes, e.g. italics and bold. More flexible than similar programs I've seen, and makes careful comparison of typefaces easy.

                  Requires Prefab Player, which is not a bad idea to download and install anyway.

                  Free in the Files section here, as "Font Sampler".

                  John R.
                • John Kaufmann
                  John, ... Unfortunately I can t sample your Sampler (since a daughter took the Mac to school), but I m intrigued: In WP 4 or 5 (early 90s) on AOS, DOS and
                  Message 8 of 14 , Oct 17, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    John,

                    In a message dated 2011.10.18 00:14 -0500, John R wrote:

                    > This creates samples of fonts installed on your computer, with your choice of text, fonts, sizes, and attributes, e.g. italics and bold. More flexible than similar programs I've seen, and makes careful comparison of typefaces easy.

                    Unfortunately I can't sample your Sampler (since a daughter took the Mac
                    to school), but I'm intrigued: In WP 4 or 5 (early 90s) on AOS, DOS and
                    Unix, WP used to do font classifications and comparisons for matching
                    purposes using font metrics defined in WPDL (WordPerfect Printer
                    Definition Language). Unfortunately that all went away with WP/Windows,
                    with Windows managing the fonts (less well, IMHO), and I never really
                    learned how WP/Mac fonts were managed. Do your font comparisons use the
                    WPDL definitions? - if not, how?

                    John K.
                  • em315
                    John s ingenious macro-and-Applescript combination reads the list of available fonts from WordPerfect s Font... menu and lets you choose the names of the fonts
                    Message 9 of 14 , Oct 18, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      John's ingenious macro-and-Applescript combination reads the list of available fonts from WordPerfect's Font... menu and lets you choose the names of the fonts for which you want samples. WordPerfect itself then produces a document with sample text for each font.

                      This has no connection at all with the "font-matching" abilities of WP for DOS/Unix/etc.

                      --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, John Kaufmann <kaufmann@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > John,
                      >
                      > In a message dated 2011.10.18 00:14 -0500, John R wrote:
                      >
                      > > This creates samples of fonts installed on your computer, with your choice of text, fonts, sizes, and attributes, e.g. italics and bold. More flexible than similar programs I've seen, and makes careful comparison of typefaces easy.
                      >
                      > Unfortunately I can't sample your Sampler (since a daughter took the Mac
                      > to school), but I'm intrigued: In WP 4 or 5 (early 90s) on AOS, DOS and
                      > Unix, WP used to do font classifications and comparisons for matching
                      > purposes using font metrics defined in WPDL (WordPerfect Printer
                      > Definition Language). Unfortunately that all went away with WP/Windows,
                      > with Windows managing the fonts (less well, IMHO), and I never really
                      > learned how WP/Mac fonts were managed. Do your font comparisons use the
                      > WPDL definitions? - if not, how?
                      >
                      > John K.
                      >
                    • em315
                      This is really excellent - and an example of the intelligent programming I mentioned in an earlier message. One warning to first-time users: the first time the
                      Message 10 of 14 , Oct 18, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        This is really excellent - and an example of the intelligent programming I mentioned in an earlier message.

                        One warning to first-time users: the first time the Applescript runs, you may think SheepShaver has locked up - but it hasn't. AppleScript is merely being very slow, and will eventually prompt you to tell it where to find WordPerfect. The next time it runs, it goes very quickly. It's only slow the first time.

                        --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, "John R" <johnrethorst@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > This creates samples of fonts installed on your computer, with your choice of text, fonts, sizes, and attributes, e.g. italics and bold. More flexible than similar programs I've seen, and makes careful comparison of typefaces easy.
                        >
                        > Requires Prefab Player, which is not a bad idea to download and install anyway.
                        >
                        > Free in the Files section here, as "Font Sampler".
                        >
                        > John R.
                        >
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.