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Re: Reveal Codes [wpmac] Re: Thinking of getting a Mac

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  • Judyth
    Joe Edgell joeedgell@mac.com takomajoe ... On the contrary: it reflects the programming principle that it s essential to proofread code and make sure nested
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 29, 2007
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      "Joe Edgell" joeedgell@... takomajoe
      > Date: Wed Nov 28, 2007 8:03 am ((PST))
      >
      >I've always felt that Reveal Codes was a band-aid to poor software
      >design.

      On the contrary: it reflects the programming principle that it's essential to proofread code and make sure nested commands are correctly nested, etc. From my perspective (as an editor of a certain age) it's the quasi-WYSIWIG that's sloppy: it was introduced so that non-professionals wouldn't feel intimidated by the knowledge they were slapping commands into their documents any-old-how --in which it was all too successful!-- and perhaps as a kind of covert job security programme for IT personnel who'd be needed to troubleshoot the resulting messed-up print jobs.

      >Ideally a wordprocessor would allow you to select whatever
      >you wanted to do something to, do that something and never peek
      >behind the curtain. Reveal codes become necessary when there's some
      >bizarre thing that's happening to your text and you need to dig under
      >the hood to find out what's causing the problem. I'll celebrate the
      >day when reveal codes is no longer necessary on any software.

      Well, it hasn't been for some time in certain professional publishing environments --especially scientific and technical ones, but increasingly in any publishing that deals with multiple manuscripts and authors and wants efficient workflows. That is to say, those outfits *don't* rely on WYSIWYG with invisible proprietary coding: instead they use markup languages --SGML, HTML, MTML, XML, etc. or an in-house tagging scheme-- within plain text files. "Reveal codes" becomes unnecessary when any text editor will show you what the "codes" are and where.

      At the current state of knowledge, you can also partly automate the checking process by running a validator program to locate badly-placed tags and the like, which is a *lot* faster than repeated passes of visual checking and printing to see whether that quasi-WYSIWYG comma is inside or outside the italics in that bibliographic entry.

      Regards,

      Judyth
      (who, alas, rarely gets to use WP any longer)

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      Judyth Mermelstein "cogito ergo lego ergo cogito..."
      Montreal, QC <judyth.mermelstein@...>
      Canada H4G 1J4 <lapomme@...>
      ##########################################################
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    • Steve Kane
      ... How does that work when it comes to creating and editing documents. Are the codes hand-typed or are there specialized, err, word processors whose native
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 2, 2007
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        On Nov 29, 2007, at 10:43 AM, Judyth wrote:

        > Well, it hasn't been for some time in certain professional
        > publishing environments --especially scientific and technical ones,
        > but increasingly in any publishing that deals with multiple
        > manuscripts and authors and wants efficient workflows. That is to
        > say, those outfits *don't* rely on WYSIWYG with invisible
        > proprietary coding: instead they use markup languages --SGML, HTML,
        > MTML, XML, etc. or an in-house tagging scheme-- within plain text
        > files. "Reveal codes" becomes unnecessary when any text editor will
        > show you what the "codes" are and where.

        How does that work when it comes to creating and editing documents.
        Are the codes hand-typed or are there specialized, err, word
        processors whose native format is sgml or similar?
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