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  • Ed Gould
    Apple confirms no Classic support in Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5) We previously reported that Mac OS X 10.5 does not support the Classic (Mac OS 9 runtime)
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 25, 2007
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      Apple confirms no Classic support in Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5)

      We previously reported that Mac OS X 10.5 does not support the
      Classic (Mac OS 9 runtime) environment for PowerPC-based Macs. The
      only option for running Mac OS 9 applications after updating to
      Leopard is to boot your system into Mac OS 9 (if it supports the OS)
      or booting into a Mac OS X 10.4.x or earlier volume.

      Apple has now confirmed this information with a Knowledge Base
      article that states:

      "Classic applications do not work on Intel processor-based Macs or
      with Mac OS X 10.5. Upgrade your Mac OS 9 applications to Mac OS X
      versions. Check with an application's manufacturer for more
      information."

      Feedback? Late-breakers@....



      http://www.macfixit.com/article.php?story=20071024141811643





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rick Taft
      Why would anyone expect Apple to support Classic. They pronounced it dead a couple of years ago. They aren t going to change their minds now! Rick Taft
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 26, 2007
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        Why would anyone expect Apple to support Classic. They pronounced it
        dead a couple of years ago. They aren't going to change their minds now!

        Rick Taft
        ricktaft@...



        On Oct 25, 2007, at 11:48 PM, Ed Gould wrote:

        > Apple confirms no Classic support in Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5)
        >
        > We previously reported that Mac OS X 10.5 does not support the
        > Classic (Mac OS 9 runtime) environment for PowerPC-based Macs. The
        > only option for running Mac OS 9 applications after updating to
        > Leopard is to boot your system into Mac OS 9 (if it supports the OS)
        > or booting into a Mac OS X 10.4.x or earlier volume.
        >
        > Apple has now confirmed this information with a Knowledge Base
        > article that states:
        >
        > "Classic applications do not work on Intel processor-based Macs or
        > with Mac OS X 10.5. Upgrade your Mac OS 9 applications to Mac OS X
        > versions. Check with an application's manufacturer for more
        > information."
        >
        > Feedback? Late-breakers@....
        >
        > http://www.macfixit.com/article.php?story=20071024141811643
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Phillip Jones, C.E.T.
        What I want to see is a definitive list of what machines can install OS.x.5. I have G4-500 Tower and a G4-1.67 GB 17 PowerBook. I thought I read somewhere,
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 27, 2007
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          What I want to see is a definitive list of what machines can install OS.x.5.

          I have G4-500 Tower and a G4-1.67 GB 17 PowerBook.

          I thought I read somewhere, unless your machine runs at 1.87 Gb or more
          you are out of luck, so far as Running Leopard is concerned.

          If so I've got two machines I need to up date and I don't know how I am
          going to afford how to do it. If I get a new tower unit I'm not going to
          skimp on the Memory (having it come with at least 4GB). And two I want
          begin to know how to move all my applications over and data.
        • Kipperman@aol.com
          check official specs for Leopard - I do not think 1.87 is required - as I recall, without checking, it was 867 ************************************** See
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 27, 2007
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            check official specs for Leopard - I do not think 1.87 is required - as I
            recall,
            without checking, it was 867



            **************************************
            See what's new at http://www.aol.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Paul Cowan
            ... Apple itself says : * Processor: G4 867 MHz, any G5, any Intel-based Mac * RAM: 512 MB for client, 1 GB for Server * Disk: 9 GB free disk space * DVD drive
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 27, 2007
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              On 27 Oct 2007, at 14h01, Phillip Jones, C.E.T. wrote:


              > I have G4-500 Tower and a G4-1.67 GB 17 PowerBook.
              >
              > I thought I read somewhere, unless your machine runs at 1.87 Gb or
              > more
              > you are out of luck, so far as Running Leopard is concerned.
              >

              Apple itself says :

              * Processor: G4 867 MHz, any G5, any Intel-based Mac
              * RAM: 512 MB for client, 1 GB for Server
              * Disk: 9 GB free disk space
              * DVD drive for installation

              So your PowerBook should be fine. *However*, if you use any Classic
              applications, be aware that Tiger is the end of the road for them.
              Leopard has no Classic environment at all, even on PPC.

              bye,


              P. (^_^) whose G5 iMac will never change its spots now
            • Frank Mitchell
              Hello Phillip ... Leopard requires an Intel, PowerMac G5 or PowerMac G4 processor but if you plan on trying it with a G4 chip, it needs to be clocking in at
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 27, 2007
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                Hello Phillip

                >What I want to see is a definitive list of what machines can install OS.x.5.

                Leopard requires an Intel, PowerMac G5 or PowerMac G4 processor but if
                you plan on trying it with a G4 chip, it needs to be clocking in at more
                than 867MHz.

                Your system needs 512MB of memory, a DVD drive to install the operating
                system and a hard drive with at least 9GB of space.

                If you're wanting to have a crack at dual-booting with Windows, you need
                to have a copy of either Windows Vista or Windows XP Service Pack 2 and
                it only works with Macs featuring an Intel processor.

                One surprising requirement is the need for at least a 1.6GHz processor
                for Leopard's DVD Player.

                <http://techlogg.com/content/view/465/31/>

                -- Frank Mitchell, Scottsdale, Arizona
              • tbgibson
                ... , Phillip Jones, C.E.T. wrote: I want to begin to know how to move all my applications over and
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 28, 2007
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                  --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com
                  <mailto:wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com> , "Phillip Jones, C.E.T."
                  <pjones1@...> wrote:

                  I want to begin to know how to move all my applications over and data.

                  Phillip... I can't answer your question about how powerful your Mac must
                  be to upgrade to Leopard, but if you do get new machines, the matter of
                  moving your stuff over is simple:

                  When you first turn your new computer on, you're given the opportunity
                  to connect it via firewire cable to your old computer and transfer over
                  as much as you want, including applications, settings and
                  documents--everything. It's very easy and your new computer will
                  resemble your old one as much as you'd like it to. Even if you don't to
                  this right away, there are ways to create the opportunity again or to
                  put the old computer in Target Disk Mode
                  <http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=58583> and copy files
                  over at firewire speeds.

                  Either way, it's not a problem.

                  FYI: I upgraded my 2GHz Intel Core Duo MacBook last night and I love
                  Leopard. I've never worked with virtual or multiple desktops, though, so
                  I don't know how I'll take advantage of Spaces yet. Any ideas how it can
                  help?

                  Tina




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Douglas Bouley
                  Hi, Tina, I ve used virtual desktops for years in the nix world. I make a functional group on a given desktop, lumping together similar tasks. One example
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 28, 2007
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                    Hi, Tina,

                    I've used virtual desktops for years in the 'nix world. I make a
                    "functional group" on a given desktop, lumping together similar tasks.
                    One example of how I have used them is like this:

                    1 desktop has a full-sized browser open
                    1 desktop has mail clients (2, in my case)
                    1 desktop has stacked terminal sessions with SSH connections to my
                    servers (I am a UNIX SysAdmin)
                    1 desktop has a WinXPP session open on the corporate Windows network

                    And don't tell the boss, but I've been known to put up a movie on a
                    separate desktop every so often...

                    That's one general idea anyway. When I install 10.5 on my MBP, I may
                    very well assign a desktop to a Parallels session, as well.

                    Doug

                    Switching between major functions thus becomes very clean and simple.

                    tbgibson wrote:
                    > FYI: I upgraded my 2GHz Intel Core Duo MacBook last night and I love
                    > Leopard. I've never worked with virtual or multiple desktops, though, so
                    > I don't know how I'll take advantage of Spaces yet. Any ideas how it can
                    > help?
                    >
                    > Tina
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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