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Re: [wpmac] what is "classic environment"

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  • Daryl Chinn
    Apple is slowly phasing out System 9 support. With OS X, Classic is System 9 s equivalent. It runs side-by-side with OS X (all versions of OS X). Under
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 23, 2007
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      Apple is slowly phasing out System 9 support. With OS X,
      "Classic" is System 9's equivalent. It runs side-by-side
      with OS X (all versions of OS X). Under this scheme, you
      can run an OS X program (MS Word X, for example) and switch
      seamlessly to a System 9 program (WordPerfect, for example)
      without noticing you're switching operating systems. The
      typeface on the top of the Mac screen will (usually) tell
      you whether you're in Classic or OS X; the Apple will be
      multicolored under Classic, blue under OS X.

      I believe that with OS 10.3 (certainly not 10.4), Classic
      was still an operating system that was distinct and
      separate from OS X—you could even ask the computer to start
      (and only run on) System 9—equivalent of Classic—but only
      OS 9 programs would run]. You had to load it before you
      could load a Sys 9 program. You didn't necessarily need to
      partition the disk for OS 9, although it clearly worked for
      Randall Wilson, and I've done similar brute force
      things.

      Before you do what Randall suggests, look through the OSX
      install disks you have (if you have them at all). There
      should be a set of System 9 disks if you bought the
      computer new. One Apple tech told me I had to install 9
      first before going on to 10, but that isn't necessarily
      true (I didn't follow his advice). Once you install 9 from
      disks, you'll probably have to go to Apple's website and
      upgrade to 9.2.2, the last System 9 that Apple
      supported.

      And be sure to back up your work before you start any or
      all of this. If you upgrade to 10.4 (Tiger), all this will
      be a slightly different story, so this applies to 10.3 and
      below.

      Finally, for Intel Macs: until John Rethorst developed
      Sheepsaver, you couldn't install WordPerfect on Intel Macs.
      For that, go to other topics in this great forum.



      --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, "Randall C. Wilson" <rwilson@...> wrote:
      >
      > Probably OS9 was never installed.
      >
      > Go to System Prefs and click on classic and look for an OS9 system
      > folder in the window, if there are none you probably need to install
      > OS9 (I think 9.2.2 is the version to shoot for.)
      >
      > Unfortunately this may not be a simple matter. When I tried to
      > upgrade an OS 9 Powerbook to Tiger, I found that I could not
      > successfully install OS9. Tiger will recognize Classic if it was
      > installed but was not cooperating with its installation the way
      > earlier versions of OSX would. The solution for me was to go back to
      > scratch and reformat the entire drive after backing up all files to
      > media. I created a separate hard partition for OS9 and Tiger was
      > happy with this. Before you resort to this, I suggest you do a
      > search on your computer to make extra sure that there is currently no
      > OS9 folder installed.
      >
      > Getting OS 9.2.2 installed also unfortunately requires multiple
      > installations as you need to start with, (I think) an OS 9.0 disk and
      > do successive upgrades to get to the final version. As OS 9.0
      > introduced some stability issues with WordPerfect (at least for me)
      > you may want to be at the final version.
      >
      > That said, WP Mac running under Classic is very stable.
      >
      > >I must be missing a huge thing here. I have a iBook G4 with MAC
      > >OSX 10.3.9. I have started the process of downloading WP, but
      > >hit a stumbling block when I clicked on "install WP". I get the
      > >message "Classic cannot find a MAC OS 9 system folder". I do not
      > >have MAX OS 9 as I was given this iBook used. Is there anything
      > >else I can do? Thank you.
      > >Lynn
      >
      > --
      > /S/ Randall
      >
      > mailto:rwilson@...
      >
      > Alternate: mailto:gryndal@...
      >
    • John Rethorst
      ... I wish I could claim credit, since SheepShaver is so terrific, but it was developed by Christian Bauer and Gwenole Beauchesne. See:
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 24, 2007
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        --- In wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com, "Daryl Chinn" <darylngee@...> wrote:

        > Finally, for Intel Macs: until John Rethorst developed
        > Sheepsaver, you couldn't install WordPerfect on Intel Macs.
        > For that, go to other topics in this great forum.

        I wish I could claim credit, since SheepShaver is so terrific, but it was
        developed by Christian Bauer and Gwenole Beauchesne. See:

        http://sheepshaver.cebix.net/

        and

        http://gwenole.beauchesne.info/en/projects/sheepshaver

        John R.
      • Karl Winkelmann
        ... Not quite true. Classic is a Mac OS X software environment that allows you to run a full Mac OS 9 system at the same time as Mac OS X, but only when booted
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 25, 2007
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          > On or about 2/24/2007 4:14 AM wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com AKA
          wordperfectmac@yahoogroups.com eruditely mused the following:

          >With OS X,
          >"Classic" is System 9's equivalent. It runs side-by-side
          >with OS X (all versions of OS X).

          Not quite true. Classic is a Mac OS X software environment that allows
          you to run a full Mac OS 9 system at the same time as Mac OS X, but only
          when booted in Mac OS X.

          This link might be useful to you for installing OS 9
          <http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?path=Mac/10.4/en/mh763.html>.

          Cheers
          Karl Winkelmann
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